Test Setup

We will use our standard AIO test rig which you can read more about in its introduction article. We will set up each cooler in the same manner with the radiator attached to the case and the fans blowing into the radiator. The water blocks will be mounted per the manufacturer’s instructions except that we will use Arctic Cooling MX-2 thermal paste (2019 Edition). We will also compare it to the other coolers we have tested thus far.

The FPS Review AIO Test Rig System Specifications Table

Installation

Installation on our testbed was fairly straight forward but almost turned into a stretch with the water tubes only being 380mm long. Ultimately it fit just fine on our testbed, but all of the other AIOs that we have reviewed have 400mm length tubing.

We bolted the radiator on to the case and then put on the water block. The cube shroud is removable which makes it a lot easier to work with the tubing and get the water block mounted and then snap the shroud on to the top.

ASUS Ryujin 240 installed on the FPS Review test system

With everything comfortably situated, let’s start seeing what kind of numbers the ASUS ROG RYUJIN 240 can put up today!

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David Schroth

David is a computer hardware enthusiast that has been tinkering with computer hardware for the past 25 years.

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7 Comments

  1. David, did you see the video by GN on AIO Setups and things to avoid?

    Air in the system will always travel to the highest portion of the system. Having the inlet/outlet of the radiator in the orientation that you have, will lead to weaker water-flow to the block.

  2. I’ve always wondered how AIOs deal with air. I had assumed they just vacuum filled them to eliminate all the air, and the hoses were flexible enough to handle the thermal expansion. Any air that gets in afterwards would have been either from a leak or suspended in the coolant and come out of solution, and would pretty much kill the AIO.

    Any air in a closed loop system is bad no matter where it collects – in a pump it will kill the pump, in a line it will kill flow, in a rad it will kill cooling, and anywhere in the flow path and it makes noise. That’s half the reason why you have a tank in a custom loop – so the air can collect there and stay out of your lines, pumps, and rads.

  3. Steve’s rational on air though made sense, in that if you place it on portion of the tank where the water migrates from hot to cool, it’s the least impactful.
  4. David, did you see the video by GN on AIO Setups and things to avoid?

    Air in the system will always travel to the highest portion of the system. Having the inlet/outlet of the radiator in the orientation that you have, will lead to weaker water-flow to the block.

    Yeah.. saw it. Couple of issues with changing the orientation though….

    1. Radiator tubes are not long enough on any aio tested so far to flip it over on the current rig.
    2. Would have to redo all testing for comparison data across all coolers.

    So, maybe when I’m in the market for a new case I’ll change it out, but at this point, less than perfect will be the way we have to do it

  5. Yeah.. saw it. Couple of issues with changing the orientation though….

    1. Radiator tubes are not long enough on any aio tested so far to flip it over on the current rig.
    2. Would have to redo all testing for comparison data across all coolers.

    So, maybe when I’m in the market for a new case I’ll change it out, but at this point, less than perfect will be the way we have to do it

    Thank you for the explanation! Keep up the great work on the reviews!

  6. Thank you for the explanation! Keep up the great work on the reviews!

    Just flipped through the video a second time. Overall, the main reason we would have issues in the current orientation is more related to bubbles getting sucked into the tubes – it seems to be the "best" of the "wrong" ways to mount it… So that’s something, right?

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