GeekBench 5

Our next test is GeekBench 5 OpenCL and Vulkan Compute Benchmark.  This is the only test in our lineup here that can also test Vulkan, which is unique.  The result is an overall score.

AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT Geekbench 5 OpenCL Compute Benchmark graph

In this first graph, we are comparing OpenCL Compute.  Once again we do see a large improvement from the Radeon RX 5700 XT.  The Radeon RX 6700 XT is a whopping 242% faster than the Radeon RX 5700 XT.  However, the GeForce RTX 3060 Ti and GeForce RTX 3070 are both faster still.  The RTX 3060 Ti is 23% faster than the RX 6700 XT.  The RTX 3070 is 37% faster.

AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT Geekbench 5 Vulkan Compute Benchmark graph

In this graph above we are looking at Vulkan Compute performance.  The results show that the Radeon RX 6700 XT isn’t much faster than the Radeon RX 5700 XT in this API.  It’s only 2% faster, so that’s an interesting result.  The GeForce RTX 3060 Ti is much faster at 64% over the RX 6700 XT.  The GeForce RTX 3070 is 112% faster than the Radeon RX 6700 XT.

These Vulkan results are interesting because, in the past, AMD had a leg up on Vulkan performance given its evolution from Mantel.  However, today, with the current generation, when it comes to Vulkan Compute performance, even the RTX 3060 Ti has a big leg up over the Radeon RX 6700 XT.

Aida64 GPGPU Benchmark

Our last test compares the results from Aida64 GPGPU Benchmark.  We have put the screenshots side-by-side so you can compare all the data. 

AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT Aida64 GPGPU Benchmark Screenshot

There are a few noteworthy differences here.  Memory Copy performance is a lot faster, almost double, on the Radeon RX 6700 XT versus the other video cards.  This could be the signs of the AMD Infinity Cache doing its job.

Looking at the Single-Precision FLOPS performance, the GeForce RTX video cards are much faster.  However, the tables turn in the Double Precision FLOPS results, the Radeon RX video cards are faster, with the 6700 XT being the fastest.

Looking at the Integer IOPS it seems the Radeon RX 6700 XT is good at 24-bit and 32-bit.  However, once it hits 64-bit it falls way behind, and RTX 3070 is much faster.

AES-256 seems to be much stronger on the GeForce RTX cards as does SHA-1 Hash. Single-Precision Julia is faster on the RTX 3070, but Double-Precision Mandel is faster on the Radeon RX 6700 XT.

Brent Justice

Brent Justice has been reviewing computer components for 20+ years, educated in the art and method of the computer hardware review he brings experience, knowledge, and hands-on testing with a gamer oriented...

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10 Comments

  1. I had thought that AMD’s solutions for Professionals and Creators were always solid an competitive. Boy was I wrong! Thanks for the follow-through on another great review Brent!

    nVidia’s OPTIX is really a game-changer it seems with respects to performance. Those Blender times are nuts!

  2. The Vulkan test was interesting – virtually unchanged from the 5700. Makes me wonder if it’s immature drivers causing some of this, as every other test shows at least some architectural improvements. That would be a heck of a driver bug – but hey, it’s AMD, drivers… yeah.

    Or maybe they just heavily optimized gaming, after years of optimizing compute only to lose on gaming benchmarks… possible but doesn’t fit the pattern.

  3. I guess for most people this shouldn’t be an issue. But I’d still get the RTX3070 if only becuase I’ve been waiting for so long… :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:

    nVidia’s OPTIX is really a game-changer it seems with respects to performance. Those Blender times are nuts!

    RTX cores at its best.

  4. Glad you guys decided to look at workstation productivity shiznit, as I know you were thinking about doing such. Very interesting stuff. Great article! Hope to see more like it in the future. Yyeeaahh sadly the way things are, CUDA and OptiX and NVENC are unstoppable. nVidia is kinda the only real choice for these kinds of workloads. Radeons don’t even win with the OpenCL stuff.
  5. The productivity stuff doesn’t mean much to me, but the streaming capabilities and nvidia broadcast tip the scale IMO.

    BTW some photoshop/vegas filter benchmarks would be welcomed.

  6. The productivity stuff doesn’t mean much to me, but the streaming capabilities and nvidia broadcast tip the scale IMO.

    Same; I need to test RTX voice out on something that has RTX though. That’s a big one for me given that it’s pretty hard and pretty inconvenient to get to a place where the ambient noise is below the noise floor of the recording equipment!

  7. As someone who has been using gpu computing in a professional field for a long time, there is a reason we only ever consider buying nvidia gpus.
    And it’s not like the CPU market where AMD can just pull an ace like with the CPU market against intel. In their absence, they allowed nvidia to become so entrenched in the professional gpu market that they stand no chance. Many software uses proprietary nvidia technology that makes AMD a non player even if it had the performance.
  8. As someone who has been using gpu computing in a professional field for a long time, there is a reason we only ever consider buying nvidia gpus.
    And it’s not like the CPU market where AMD can just pull an ace like with the CPU market against intel. In their absence, they allowed nvidia to become so entrenched in the professional gpu market that they stand no chance. Many software uses proprietary nvidia technology that makes AMD a non player even if it had the performance.

    I’ve said this dozens of times, not only do you get great performance hardware with nvidia, but better support and middleware that makes it a much better choice. Cry all you want for OpenCL, CUDA is the de facto standard in many content creation applications. OPTIX is also orders of magnitude faster than anything AMD has to offer and don’t even get me started with AI and inferencing.

    AMD has to invest in middleware if they want to compete on the high end, for years AMD was a compute monster but all that power got to waste in most professional applications.

  9. AMD has done a great job closing the hardware gap this generation. This is especially true given how far behind NVIDIA they’ve been over the last few years. However, the software front is an entirely different story. On the gaming end, they still lack a competitive alternative to DLSS. On the professional side, the above post covers it pretty well so I’ll leave it at that.
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