Memory Support

AMD’s Ryzen 3000 series supports up to 128GB of DDR4 memory. Using two modules, AMD supports up to DDR4 3200MHz speeds nativeley, instead of the lower speed JEDEC specs Intel supports. The memory controller supports dual channel memory mode operation.

Historically, AMD’s Ryzen series has been a mixed bag when it comes to memory support in a number of areas. While physically large RAM sizes have been supported, higher speeds were difficult to reach. Using four modules only compounded the problem. Like previous Ryzen series processors, using four DIMMs reduced the supported memory speeds. At best, 2933MHz is the fastest supported speed using four DIMMs.

Above the speed issues, the biggest problem the Ryzen 3000 series has had was memory compatibility. Since the launch of the Ryzen 1000 series, I’ve tested many different kits on several different motherboards. It always seemed to take at least two or three kits to find a compatible set for any given motherboard review. Of course, this improved with various AGESA code updates and with each chipset release. B350 and X399 were both better than X370, X470 was better than X370 and of course, X570 maintains the same trend. In our initial review, I could only go off the chart AMD’s reviewer’s guide provided above given the time constraints. Now, I’ve had an opportunity to try several more motherboards, Ryzen 3000 series processors and multiple memory kits to get a sense of just how good compatibility actually is.

AMD has claimed that Ryzen 3000 memory was better, and thankfully I can confirm that. I used six different kits on three different motherboards and three separate Ryzen 3000 series processors without any issues what so ever. So, based on those experiences it seems that AMD has definitely improved its memory compatibility.