Image: Pixels

Pixels has shown us that there’s very little that RGB cannot find its way into these days. Taking us back to the root of role-playing games creator Jean Simonet has developed electronic dice. No these are not the kind of dice to get you into trouble at the local casino. These do, however, include most of the modern feature’s PC users have come to expect from enthusiast accessories and peripheral devices.

Having put some thought into this product he’s really packed a lot of features into this old but not forgotten tool of tabletop games.

  • RGB LED in dice can be customized to be controlled individually or in unison.
  • Have specific colors illuminate for a specific roll. Maybe red for a fail or multiple color changes for successes.
  • Create your own animation patterns for the RGBs.
  • Bluetooth connectivity to phone apps. See your rolls live and have them interact in games. Potentially have online integration with games.
  • Wireless charging via their own carrying case with charge lasting at least five hours. There is a disclaimer it could last longer depending on fidgeting.
  • Using standard sizes, they could easily be mixed with other dice.
  • Variety of base colors to be offered.
  • Designed with care for balance and the ‘feel’ of dice in mind.
  • Durable and even waterproof.
Image: Pixels
Image: Pixels

According to the website their Kickstarter campaign has not yet begun but are hoping to begin in June 2020. The offer will comprise of choices of how many dice, base colors, and face designs. They hope to begin shipping within 6 months after finishing the campaign. The price, however, is a little up there. The goal is approximately $25 to $30 per die.

For even more details on the app and descriptions visit their hackaday page here.


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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

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10 Comments

  1. The more complex the insides, the harder it is to balance. These are going to favor some number. With that said, rainbows all the way for 20s.

  2. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 9913, member: 6″]
    Oh for fuck’s sake.
    [/QUOTE]
    Some 20 years ago, I remember purchasing cathode case lights for my build… nowadays, I avoid anything RGB as much as possible. Fortunately, a lot of quality can be found without this nonsense. The last thing I want on my desk is something that looks like a puke pinata.

  3. [QUOTE=”northrop, post: 9929, member: 15″]
    Some 20 years ago, I remember purchasing cathode case lights for my build… nowadays, I avoid anything RGB as much as possible. Fortunately, a lot of quality can be found without this nonsense. The last thing I want on my desk is something that looks like a puke pinata.
    [/QUOTE]

    Again, colors can be set to a single value so as not to look like unicorn vomit.

  4. ^^While true for most (all?) accessories, the little power LED on my mobo is the only LED I’m willing to put up with. Again… free market, we all have a choice to buy whatever accessories we want 🙂 Some RGB can look good, but it’s not a look I want for my build.

  5. [QUOTE=”northrop, post: 9957, member: 15″]
    ^^While true for most (all?) accessories, the little power LED on my mobo is the only LED I’m willing to put up with. Again… free market, we all have a choice to buy whatever accessories we want 🙂 Some RGB can look good, but it’s not a look I want for my build.
    [/QUOTE]

    I’ve never seen anything that didn’t either allow you to turn all the RGB LED’s off or change them to a single unified color.

  6. My 15 year old D&D playing self would have loved these. Today….not so much. But they are kinda cool looking

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