Image: ASUS

ASUS has resurrected the GeForce GT 710, an ancient graphics card powered by NVIDIA’s 2012 Kepler GPU microarchitecture. While this would be a terrible option for modern games, it could be a good fit for system builders who are looking for a GPU that can power a simple, multi-monitor setup geared toward general productivity – the GT710-4H-SL-2GD5 features four HDMI ports, takes up just one PCI-E x1 slot, and is passively cooled.

Specification-wise, we’re looking at just 192 CUDA Cores, 2 GB of GDDR5 memory, and an engine/memory clock of 954 MHz/5012 MHz. Again, this is a bad idea for gaming, but the card is good enough to output 4K @ 60 Hz (although that drops to 30 Hz if more than one monitor is connected).

  • 4x HDMI Ports enable multi-monitor productivity on up to 4 displays.
  • Single-slot Design fits in small chassis and leaves room for additional PCIe devices.
  • Passive Cooling keeps things quiet.
  • Auto-Extreme Technology uses automation to enhance reliability.
  • A 144-hour validation program puts cards through a series of stringent tests to ensure compatibility
  • GPU Tweak II provides intuitive performance tweaking, thermal controls, and system monitoring.

This card has also gone through ASUS’s 144-hour validation program, which ensures it meets the company’s performance and reliability standsrds. “Performance and stress tests are run with the latest chart-topping titles like Fortnite, League of Legends, Overwatch, and PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds,” the company writes. “We also carry out reliability trials that include a 144-hour stability test and a series of 3DMark benchmarking runs to ensure the card performs well when pushed to the limits.”

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1 Comment

  1. Wait,

    What year is it again? Are Kepler chips really still being manufactured?

    I thought Nvidia was discontinuing driver support for Kepler starting this month?

    Don’t get me wrong. I love small lightweight GPU’s for subch things like adding hardware decide support for the latest video codecs, but as I recall Kepler doesn’t even fully support HEVC decodes…

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