Image: AMD

If you own an X570 (or one of the upcoming B550) motherboards, you’re all set for AMD’s next-gen architecture. Robert Hallock, AMD’s Technical Marketing lead, has confirmed that Zen 3-based Ryzen processors will be compatible with both of these chipsets.

“AMD officially plans to support next-gen AMD Ryzen desktop processors, with the “Zen 3” architecture, on AMD X570 and B550 motherboards,” wrote Hallock. “This will require a BIOS update. Specific details about this update will come at a later time, but we’re committed to keeping you up-to-date. We’ve also updated our official chipset/CPU support matrix to take future “Zen 3” processors into account (below!).”

Image: AMD

Older chipsets will not support Zen 3, however. While AMD would love to bring its next-gen architecture to X370, B350, A320, X470, and B450, Hallock explained that this isn’t possible due to their flash memory chips, which have capacity limitations. “Given these limitations, and the unprecedented longevity of the AM4 socket, there will inevitably be a time and place where a transition to free up space is necessary—the AMD 500 Series chipsets are that time,” he wrote.

So, just how long will Socket AM4 ultimately last? That’s unclear due to the state of I/O technologies, which are rapidly changing. “Such technology changes typically require adjustments to the pin count or layout of a processor package, which would necessitate a new socket,” Hallock said.

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9 Comments

  1. Very disappointing that X470’s can’t support it. I can understand X370, A320 and B350 not making the cut, but to rule out X470/B450’s makes me sad.
  2. Most likely it’s because they have to use pinouts that were not active in previous chipsets and not built into the motherboard. I’m not disappointed in this but I didn’t go zen into the x570 so I’m in a sweet spot I suppose.

    Of course I have A MSI board with super heated mosfet’s so there is that. ;)

  3. Most likely it’s because they have to use pinouts that were not active in previous chipsets and not built into the motherboard. I’m not disappointed in this but I didn’t go zen into the x570 so I’m in a sweet spot I suppose.

    Of course I have A MSI board with super heated mosfet’s so there is that. ;)

    B450 will continue to be sold at least…

    I’ve taken some thermal images of your board’s mosfets under load and Dan will include said pictures in the review (it’s a few back in the stack right now though).

  4. Very disappointing that X470’s can’t support it. I can understand X370, A320 and B350 not making the cut, but to rule out X470/B450’s makes me sad.

    It doesn’t surprise me. Zen2 was drastically different from earlier CPU’s and maintaining that compatibility was a huge pain for AMD. Not only that, but it makes sense that the X570 and B550 chipsets were built to be more forward thinking. Lastly, it may come down to VRM quality. X570 offerings were built to handle 12c/24t and 16c/32t and potentially go beyond that. X470 and earlier chipsets and designs weren’t.

    X570 got much more expensive due to foundational changes in how motherboards and chipsets were built. In contrast, X470 was iterative on X370. It’s VRM implementations and design aren’t all that different from X370 when you get down to it. So I can’t say this is surprising to me.

  5. It doesn’t surprise me. Zen2 was drastically different from earlier CPU’s and maintaining that compatibility was a huge pain for AMD. Not only that, but it makes sense that the X570 and B550 chipsets were built to be more forward thinking. Lastly, it may come down to VRM quality. X570 offerings were built to handle 12c/24t and 16c/32t and potentially go beyond that. X470 and earlier chipsets and designs weren’t.

    X570 got much more expensive due to foundational changes in how motherboards and chipsets were built. In contrast, X470 was iterative on X370. It’s VRM implementations and design aren’t all that different from X370 when you get down to it. So I can’t say this is surprising to me.

    That all makes sense, except that the x470 can run the 3950X currently, so that 16/32T threshold should still be possible. If they go more than 16/32T in the Zen3 world, then I can easily see the need for better VRMs..

    I was just disappointed. I knew the day was coming but I didn’t think it was this next round. Pleasure to hear from you as always Dan. Especially when it’s from someone more knowledgeable on this stuff than I am :)

  6. Take your leeway where you can get it. Had these been Intel releases they would have all been new sockets. So be thankful that some backwards compatibility was possible.
  7. That all makes sense, except that the x470 can run the 3950X currently, so that 16/32T threshold should still be possible. If they go more than 16/32T in the Zen3 world, then I can easily see the need for better VRMs..

    I was just disappointed. I knew the day was coming but I didn’t think it was this next round. Pleasure to hear from you as always Dan. Especially when it’s from someone more knowledgeable on this stuff than I am :)

    It’s true that there are plenty of X470 boards that can run the 3950X. However, this is because many VRM’s are overbuilt. However, they are still built to older design guidelines. The new chips could be rather fickle about what they need. I don’t know anything about them yet beyond rumors.

  8. Meh no disapointment here my b450 can get up to the 3950x , thats an insane range of performance already for a dirt cheap (relatively) motherboard. I mean a range of 1xxx series to 3xxx cpus series its massive, in price and performance. If you are at the top ( or near) 3xxx already you will probably wait till DDR5, which will require a new socket. I doubt low end 3xxx owners will be left out in a bad position either, since most likely higher end 3xxx series cpus going to drop in price, making more sense to go there anyway.
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