Image: AMD

After months of anticipation, AMD finally unveiled its Ryzen 5000 Series processors today. While the company blew away expectations with incredible claims such as a 19 percent generational increase in IPC (“the largest since the introduction of ‘Zen’ processors in 2017”) and a 26 percent generational uplift in gaming performance for the 16C/32T Ryzen 9 5900X, some fans have expressed their disappointment at how AMD is already pulling an Intel by raising prices.

We took a look at the company’s previous press release for the Ryzen 3000 Series, and this seems to be true. The Ryzen 9 5950X will be sold for $799, while the Ryzen 9 3950X debuted at $749 (different clocks, but same core/thread count). Likewise, the Ryzen 9 5900X comes with a $549 price tag – a $50 premium over the Ryzen 9 3900X ($499). Enthusiasts seem particularly concerned about the price increases with lower-tiered SKUs such as the Ryzen 5600X. There’s also the fact that the majority of Ryzen 5000 Series CPUs will not come with stock coolers (only the Ryzen 5 5600X gets one).

“…the price hikes are really not good news and dont make total sense to me,” wrote one user on r/Hardware. “I mean $50 on a $500 top end chip is acceptable as its only 10%, but $50 dollars on a previously $250 chip? 20% premium on the low end is very bad. They are leaving room for intel to compete with small price cuts on 4-6 month old chips.”

“Yeah over the course of the presentation I went from ‘well, I’m definitely getting a 5600X’ to ‘oh, I guess I’ll need to think about this,'” agreed another. “It’s certainly a gamble for them. They probably need to bring their margins up but risk losing their position as value king. If Intel is smart they could drop prices on 10th gen and really hurt AMD.”

On the other hand, AMD’s increased pricing for the Ryzen 5000 Series is perfectly justified based on the remarkable improvements that the Zen 3 architecture brings. As noted above, these CPUs deliver an unbelievable increase in IPC. In fact, the performance is so good that AMD may have finally stolen the gaming performance crown from Intel.

“It actually may be very good for their brand, long term,” argues one user. “By increasing price they start to shift their image as competing with Intel on quality/performance rather than on value. They had already started this shift with the 3000 series, so it’s really just a continuation of their strategy.”

If you’re planning to jump on the Zen 3 train, let us know what you think of the new prices. The Ryzen 9 5950X, Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 7 5800X, and Ryzen 5 5600X will be available on November 5, 2020.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors

MODELCORES/THREADSTDP(Watts)BOOST9/BASE FREQ. (GHz)TOTAL CACHECOOLERSEP (USD)EXPECTED AVAILABILITY
AMD Ryzen™ 9 5950X16C/32T105WUp to 4.9 / 3.472MBN/A$799November 5, 2020
AMD Ryzen™ 9 5900X12C/24T105WUp to 4.8 / 3.770MBN/A$549November 5, 2020
AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800X8C/16T105WUp to 4.7 / 3.836MBN/A$449November 5, 2020
AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600X6C/12T65WUp to 4.6 / 3.735MBWraith Stealth$299November 5, 2020

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20 Comments

  1. Valid point about $50 being a bigger deal on the 5600X than the other chips. Intel has a reluctance to cut prices, but if they do, AMD still has wriggle room.

    I don’t do enough encoding to appreciate 12 cores vs 8, so I’m looking at a 5800X to replace my 2700X/X470. I think that will be the sweet spot for gaming with the 8 core CCX.

    My X570, DDR3600, and PCIe 4 drives are ready for a Zen 3 build ASAP.

  2. 5800X is pushing it as the 3800X was already too much for 8 cores.

    At this pricing for gaming only, it makes more sense to go Intel as they are at least getting another upgrade on the same chipset…

    I mean the 5900X and 5600X are fine pricing-wise vs Intel but I do not get the 5800X pricing.

  3. Pricing has gone up, but they are estimated MSRP so who knows. I don’t personally care about the cooler. My wraith prism is still sitting in the box.

  4. I was going to say, how many on these forums are running on a stock cooler? That and an extra 50 bucks doesn’t seem that bad to me… BUT if that starts a trend that could be an issue. I’m not paying much over 800 ever for a good CPU as things stand in technology today.

  5. The 3000 series is still the bang for the buck that it was last week – if You thought the performance was good enough value, it still is. now AMD just has the single thread performance lead in another product at a higher, but still intel competitive or better price.

    also agree regarding stock cooler Not normally getting used. I Would say never, but I just used a stock i3 cooler on a raspberry pi, and it worked great!

  6. I can understand people being upset about the increase on the lower end of the product line. For the 5900X and 5950X, I don’t think it’s a big deal. I also don’t see the loss of stock coolers a big deal for anyone but 5600X buyers.

  7. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 20387, member: 1041″]
    also agree regarding stock cooler Not normally getting used. I Would say never, but I just used a stock i3 cooler on a raspberry pi, and it worked great!
    [/QUOTE]
    Got a stock cooler on a 9100F (poor decision), and it runs great. And Intel could probably take a page out of AMDs book and provide a better option for their midrange stuff too.

    But above the midrange? There’s enough power draw and heat output involved that the cooling solution should be considered in the context of the enclosure and the rest of the planned system, so I get leaving them out there. And for a lot of those CPUs, cooling capacity winds up bracketing in performance, which can affect critical perceptions. They’d essentially have to overshoot quite a bit and at that point people would rather just spend the difference on something they choose.

  8. I’m ok with this. Prices should be a touch higher until there is some competition.

    Not saying they should nVidia the price and double it for 15% performance, but the price increase seems fair given the (alleged) benefit in performance relative to the competition and their other SKUs.

    And yeah, while the AMD Wraith was a nice touch, I won’t lament it being gone on higher end chips either.

  9. I don’t have a problem with the higher end prices but the 5600x being $100 more I’m not such a big fan of. If it’s truly 19% faster than the 3600X you’re still talking a 50% markup and if it turns out like I expect to where it’s really only more like 5-10% in real world use then it won’t be worth it.

  10. I’m fine with the pricing on the upper end of the line but I don’t like the 5600X being $300. I mean yeah it is supposedly 20% faster than a 3600X but I don’t necessarily think that means it should cost 20% more. By that logic the 3080 should be $1300 since its around 70% faster than a 2080.

  11. [QUOTE=”MacLeod, post: 20451, member: 261″]
    I’m fine with the pricing on the upper end of the line but I don’t like the 5600X being $300. I mean yeah it is supposedly 20% faster than a 3600X but I don’t necessarily think that means it should cost 20% more. By that logic the 3080 should be $1300 since its around 70% faster than a 2080.
    [/QUOTE]
    Isn’t the 5600X like $50 less than what intel charged for the 7700k when they had the lead? I guess I don’t see the problem with the price?

  12. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 20453, member: 1041″]
    Isn’t the 5600X like $50 less than what intel charged for the 7700k when they had the lead? I guess I don’t see the problem with the price?
    [/QUOTE]

    Beats me. I can’t remember too much what Intel chips went for 3 generations ago. I just know that a 3600X went for $200 to $250 max so a 20-50% increase in price just for 19% increase in performance doesn’t seem worth it. $250 would’ve been just about right IMO.

  13. I agree with others in saying the price increase on the 5600x seems a bit steep. This model is basically the low end of the mid-range product stack and should be much more sensitive to price increases compared to higher end models. It’s also a much larger percentage increase compared to the other models.

  14. I expected better value from the new lineup than we had with Zen2. I was holding off on getting a 3900X because of this? Now I feel stupid. The 5900X is only 10-15% faster. And with the deals on the 3900X that were around in past months the real world price difference won’t just be $50 in my region, I can guarantee it.

    And I think the 3800X had no reason to exist anyway. The 3700 / X is so much better value. And now they double down on the 800X series. Yeah, this is kind of an Intel move. The seat of power is still hot from Intel and they are already dialing back on the value they offer to users.

  15. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 20480, member: 1298″]
    I expected better value from the new lineup than we had with Zen2. I was holding off on getting a 3900X because of this? Now I feel stupid. The 5900X is only 10-15% faster. And with the deals on the 3900X that were around in past months the real world price difference won’t just be $50 in my region, I can guarantee it.

    And I think the 3800X had no reason to exist anyway. The 3700 / X is so much better value. And now they double down on the 800X series. Yeah, this is kind of an Intel move. The seat of power is still hot from Intel and they are already dialing back on the value they offer to users.
    [/QUOTE]

    The 3700X cut the throat of the 3800X for the reasons you stated. Most people bought the 3700X because it was such a good value. Unfortunately, the 3800X was a higher margin part. AMD is not a charity and I’ve said this many times before. I understand why they dropped the idea of a 3700X replacement right now.

    As for the rest, AMD actually claimed a 19% IPC improvement on Zen 3 over Zen 2. Therefore, the 5900X would be that much faster although there are likely to be cases where these numbers fall or increase depending on the application. 20% is not nothing. This is achieved through both architectural improvements and at least a slight bump in boost clocks.

    As for the value part, I’m not sure I agree. No, it’s not a good value for someone who already owns a Ryzen 3000 series CPU. It is a good value for many people with older systems that are looking to upgrade. Especially if what AMD says about single-threaded performance is true, and they are that much better at gaming. At 1080P gaming especially, even the 3000 series still trailed Intel by a decent margin depending on the game. The $50 increase is unfortunate. No one wants to see that and for the 5600X and 5800X, I do agree and think that’s a shame. Those are the price points where that $50 hits people harder. At the 5900X and 5950X level, I think it’s really not a big deal. I paid for the 3950X in my machine and as someone who used to buy Intel HEDT and Extreme Edition parts at $1,000 or more, I think the 5950X is an incredible value. Not necessarily as an upgrade for specific people like myself, but just as a product or for someone coming into this with a 1st gen Ryzen or some sort of Intel quad core.

    Of course, as the 3000 series gets discounted, there will be some real bargains there. I would opt for the 5000 series if I were using it for gaming as those CPU’s will be able to provide a better experience should the single-thread IPC gains prove to be true. I’ll test that as soon as we get one on the bench.

    Believe that. 🙂

  16. So… AMD isn’t exactly known for sticking to it’s MSRP prices. They typically discount them fast. The 3700X has a $329 MSRP and it stayed there for all of about 3 months….

    [ATTACH=full]516[/ATTACH]

  17. Not worrying about price so much, just actually being available to purchase.
    As for coming with coolers…. The stock ones suck, period.

    Most of us have better cooling solutions already on hand.

  18. [QUOTE=”Dogsofjune, post: 20491, member: 168″]
    Not worrying about price so much, just actually being available to purchase.
    As for coming with coolers…. The stock ones suck, period.

    Most of us have better cooling solutions already on hand.
    [/QUOTE]
    I just like to have them as backup in case I need them for something. But I don’t know how adoptable AMD’s stock cooler are, the intel ones I Always found an use for. Except for when intel screwed around and moved the mounting holes like 1mm between generations.

  19. Who knows if this is legitimate… looks like a screen capture of a Korean Command Prompt… but it’s something to add to the mix.

    [MEDIA=twitter]1315477822220062720[/MEDIA]

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