Image: Corsair

Corsair has announced its latest lineup of mechanical gaming keyboards: the K60 RGB PRO, K60 RGB PRO SE, K60 RGB LOW PROFILE, and K60 PRO. While the latter lacks RGB lighting effects (it only lights up in red), the majority of these models boast CHERRY’s awesome VIOLA switches, which offer smooth, linear travel (no tactile bump or audible click).

As CHERRY explains on its product page, VIOLA keyswitches comprise a V-Shape, “CrossLinear” contact system for a more satisfying typing experience, as well as eight guide rails to reduce wobbling and/or scratches. Actuation force is 45 cN/75 cN (pre-travel/end of travel), while total travel measures in at 4.0 mm (this appears to be the average for mechanical switches, but it’s a significant change for users who are coming from lower-profile switches like Logitech’s 2.7-mm GLs).

Users who prefer lower travel will want to opt for the K60 RGB LOW PROFILE, which ditches the VIOLAs for CHERRY MX Low Profile RGB SPEED switches. These feature an actuation force of 45 cN and a shorter travel distance of 3.2 mm.

The K60 RGB PRO ($89.99), K60 PRO ($79.99), K60 RGB PRO SE ($99.99), and K60 RGB LOW PROFILE ($109.99) are available now at Corsair’s webstore.

Original Press Release

CORSAIR®, a world leader in high-performance gaming peripherals and enthusiast components, today announced the launch of the new K60 RGB PRO, the first CORSAIR keyboard to feature CHERRY VIOLA keyswitches. Delivering an essential gaming experience without compromising on style or substance, the K60 RGB PRO is built with a durable aluminum frame, vibrant, per-key RGB backlighting, and new 100% German-made CHERRY VIOLA mechanical keyswitches, featuring smooth linear travel and reliable inputs to secure clutch victories when they matter most.

Equipped with new CHERRY VIOLA keyswitches, the K60 RGB PRO offers gamers the precision, feel, and reliability made possible by mechanical keyswitches. Created by CHERRY, the inventor of the mechanical keyswitch, the new VIOLA keyswitches utilize a patented self-cleaning V-Shape contact system and a two-stage, CrossLinear activation. The result is a smooth linear keypress and a satisfying fast reset ready to take on whatever your fingers can throw at it.

Topped by sturdy and stylish brushed aluminum, the K60 RGB PRO continues the CORSAIR legacy of streamlined looks and battle-tested durability. Vibrant dynamic per-key RGB backlighting, with custom keycaps for an enhanced underglow, illuminates your desktop in rich, customizable color. The K60 RGB PRO’s full range of colors and RGB lighting effects are unlocked with CORSAIR iCUE software, synchronizing with all iCUE-compatible CORSAIR devices for spectacular system-wide displays. iCUE also offers in-depth personalization, such as key remaps and custom macro programming, to make K60 RGB PRO your own, while iCUE game integrations enable all iCUE compatible devices to dynamically react to in-game actions and events when playing select games.

The K60 RGB PRO also delivers a range of premium features that have long defined CORSAIR mechanical gaming keyboards. Full N-key rollover ensures that every keypress registers precisely as intended, and Windows Key Lock mode guarantees that you’ll never interrupt your game at crucial moments. Convenient keyboard shortcuts control media playback, volume, and onboard lighting effects on-the-fly, keeping you focused and immersed.

Also set to join the K60 PRO lineup are the K60 PRO, which features the same CHERRY VIOLA keyswitches and single-color red LED backlighting, the K60 RGB PRO SE, which adds a premium magnetic detachable cushioned palm rest and wear-and-shine resistant PBT double-shot keycaps, and the K60 RGB PRO LOW PROFILE, which offers the lower 11.9mm switch height and short actuation performance of CHERRY MX Low Profile RGB SPEED keyswitches. These three variants of the K60 PRO will launch in select regions and retailers over the coming months.

With an iconic brushed aluminum frame, 100% CHERRY mechanical keyswitches, and brilliant lighting, each K60 PRO keyboard is a stylish and strong choice to make you the key player in every game.

Don’t Miss Out on More FPS Review Content!

Our weekly newsletter includes a recap of our reviews and a run down of the most popular tech news that we published.

Join the Conversation

6 Comments

  1. I’ve never cared for the linear, non-tactile switches. But this is good news for people who like them. That said, I am not a huge fan of Corsair’s iCUE software. I’ve also had weird behavior from their keyboards in the past. I have a K70 that’s pre-RGB and only lights up red and that one has worked well on some systems.

  2. heh…I never cared for the tactile switches. I also have a K70 Lux with red lighting. It has MX Brown’s. Perfect for my style of typing and gaming. I did the o-ring mod. Just awesome to type on without all the noise.

    I agree on iCue. It’s a bit of a disaster. What really sucks is that I have a logitech mouse. If I have both iCue and LGS running at the same time I get really weird issues with the mouse while gaming. It’ll jump around sometimes.

  3. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 20892, member: 4″]
    heh…I never cared for the tactile switches. I also have a K70 Lux with red lighting. It has MX Brown’s. Perfect for my style of typing and gaming. I did the o-ring mod. Just awesome to type on without all the noise.

    I agree on iCue. It’s a bit of a disaster. What really sucks is that I have a logitech mouse. If I have both iCue and LGS running at the same time I get really weird issues with the mouse while gaming. It’ll jump around sometimes.
    [/QUOTE]
    I have a K95 with Brown switches, as well, and I also think they’re perfect. My K70 at work has Blue switches and they’re actually quite hard on the finger tips after a whole day. This think is built like a rock, though, so I don’t think I’ll be replacing it any time soon.

    I’ve never had any conflict issues with iCUE and LGS. iCUE has gotten some poor updates in the past, but I have not had an issue with it in a long time. To be honest, none of these programs are very good and it’s been that way for as long as I can remember. I swear they’re being programmed by the marketers, themselves.

  4. I have a K70 with speed switches (K70 Rapidfire) – the keyboard has been great, but the switches are a bit too twitchy. I’ve had it for several years and still not gotten used to it, just haven’t bit the bullet to buy a new one yet. Apart from the switches being a bit too sensitive for my fat fingers, the keyboard has been bulletproof, I’d certainly buy another Corsair.

    My wife has the K70 with Cherry Reds (K70 LUX). It’s a couple of years newer than mine, but no noticable difference (apart from the switches) in the two.

    I agree completely about iCUE… not my favorite, but at least once you get it set it’s unobstrusive.

  5. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 20885, member: 6″]
    That said, I am not a huge fan of Corsair’s iCUE software.
    [/QUOTE]
    [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 20892, member: 4″]
    I agree on iCue. It’s a bit of a disaster.
    [/QUOTE]
    [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 20896, member: 96″]
    I agree completely about iCUE… not my favorite, but at least once you get it set it’s unobstrusive.
    [/QUOTE]
    Corsair’s software is absolute shit. Corsair Link was even worse than the Corsair Utility Engine. Good thing they don’t use it anymore. I think iCUE covers everything now, from the keyboards to the AIO closed-loop coolers. In the early days of their closed-loop coolers, the firmware on those things wuz real sketch too. Actually, same for the earlier keyboard firmware. But yeah, once you get the keyboard setup the way you want in iCUE, then you don’t have to fuck with iCUE anymore (unless you want to switch between different profiles, if you have multiple profiles for the backlighting or whatever).

    [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 20894, member: 180″]
    To be honest, none of these programs are very good and it’s been that way for as long as I can remember.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yupz.

    I’m way behind with my Logitech mouse software, I’m still using Logitech Gaming Software 9.02.65, not whatever mouse/keyboard software they use now (Logitech G HUB Advanced Gaming Software, or whatever that shit is called). Thankfully I’ve never had any conflicts between the mouse and keyboard, or between iCUE and LGS.

    I have a K70 RGB I got for Christmas some years ago. Love the Cherry MX Red switches. I’ve also used Cherry MX Brown switches and the Speed/Silver switches, I’m a fan of those as well. I’ve had a few issues with the K70 partially locking up (which doesn’t allow you to adjust the lighting brightness or turn the lighting off, or use any of the extra keys like the media ones), and with iCUE not recognizing the keyboard (even after unplugging and plugging back in, and restarting the program – I had to restart the PC). I had a few other one-time issues with the keyboard, but honestly I can’t remember them, so they must not have been that big of a deal. Overall the keyboard has been pretty solid and reliable, I got no real complaints. I like the construction too, especially the aluminum backplate. The keyboard is very easy to clean. Fuck them for using plastic clips on the wrist rest to attach it to the keyboard though. Those broke and were a pain in the ass to fix. I didn’t have any superglue on hand at the time, and I couldn’t find my tube of E6000, so I ended up using silicone RTV to reattach the clips. Corsair sells replacement wrist rests, but that shit was always out of stock, so I was never able to order any. My keyboard didn’t come with any keycap pullers, so I had to supply my own. Seemed weird cuz everyone I know who has ever bought a K70 had theirs come with a keycap puller.

    I remember this post from Dan back in 2017: [URL]https://hardforum.com/threads/confessions-of-a-custom-mechanical-keyboard-obsessive.1923977/post-1042796415[/URL]
    “I like the Cherry MX Black switch or the Cherry MX Blues. I can’t stand the Reds because they are too light. It feels like the keys activate just by looking at them. The blacks at least require some force to depress them. The linear keystroke makes for a nice experience and they are relatively quiet. I do not like the tactile bump in the browns because there is no sound to go with it. I’ll take browns over a lot of switch options, but they are definitely one of my least favorites in the Cherry MX switch family. I’ve never used clears but the Greens are pretty nice. I prefer the Blues over the greens but the difference is minor to me.” Dan’s feelings about the Red switches are kinda how I feel about the Speed/Silver switches. I cough and they activate. I will admit that when I first got the Reds, I did kinda feel they were too sensitive, and activated a bit too easily. I’ve gotten used to them over the past few years though. I’ve never used the Greens or the Blacks. I didn’t care for the Blues.

    Also this part: “The next keyboard I grabbed was the Corsair K70 Lux (red backlight) with Cherry MX Blue switches. After experiencing a number of firmware issues with it I almost chucked the damn thing in the trash.” Haha yupz, sounds about right.

    I had written this back then: “Red switches are really only as loud as you want them to be. If I go lighter on the keys with my fingers as I type, the sound softens up, and overall typing gets quieter.” This is a fucking lie. And I’m not thinking about trying to press the keys more lightly when I type. I just want to type, as fast as possible. So yeah they’re not quiet, but I wouldn’t say the noise they make is annoying either. In the past few years I haven’t really noticed it.

Leave a comment