Image: C SEED

C SEED has released a 165-inch folding MicroLED 4K TV called the M1. It can store itself in the floor when not in use, but with such interesting engineering, few would want to hide such a work of art. It uses patented Adaptive Gap Calibration Technology to create a seamless, foldable screen without visible gaps. Factor in its HDR10+ support, and viewers are in for a treat. It features two 250-watt speakers and a 700-watt subwoofer but also has support for 11.2 external audio. Those interested in purchasing one will need pockets deeper than it can fold, however: TechRadar reports it costs around $400,000.

Designer Stefan Pani, a University of Applied Arts Vienna graduate, stepped into large shoes when creating the indoor version of the famous C SEED 201 outdoor TV design by Porsche Design Studio. With the constraints inherent in outdoor applications absent, he made smart use of the possibilities that kinetics and material offered. He created a frame with integrated soundboard that unfolds and then settles smoothly on a base made up of four plates. Function follows form here, visually very coherent, luxuriously minimalist and with an exciting, aggressively elegant tension.

Specifications

  • Physical Dimensions: LED TV size (diagonal) 165-inch, LED TV size (width) 144-inch, LED TV size (height) 81-inch, Standard LED screen (depth) 3.9-inch, LED TV area 81 sq.ft.
  • Total system weight: 1,350 kg
  • Resolution: 4K (UHD)
  • Brightness: 1000 nits
  • Pixel pitch: 0.9 mm
  • Color depth: 16 Bit
  • Color spectrum: 64 billion
  • Refresh rate: 1,920 Hz
  • Lifespan: LED 100,000 hours
  • Contrast ratio: 30,000:1
  • Color temperature: 6,500 – 9,000 K
  • Viewing angle: 160 horizontal x 140 vertical degrees
  • Operating temperature range: 0 – 40 °C
  • Broadband speaker peak: 2 x 250 W
  • Broadband speaker frequency range: 40 – 22,000 Hz
  • Subwoofer peak: 1 x 700 W
  • Subwoofer frequency range: 24 – 200 Hz
  • Video input: 1 x HDMI, HDCP 2.2 support
  • Serial in/output: 2 x USB, 1 x RS232
  • Audio output: 11.2, independent sub
  • Network connection: 1 x RJ45
  • Power supply: LED screen 3 x 400V+N+PE/32A/50-60Hz AC (3~)
  • Input power max: typical W/m² 480 | 160
  • Power consumption max: typical kW 3,6 | 1,2

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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

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16 Comments

  1. [QUOTE=”Auer, post: 30351, member: 225″]
    [LIST]

  2. Refresh rate: 1,920 Hz
  3. [/LIST]
    [/QUOTE]
    Must be HDMI 20.1

  4. This is why I’m waiting for Samsung’s micro LED TV’s. In a couple years OLED will be dead and phased out, just like plasma.

  5. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 30356, member: 4″]
    This is why I’m waiting for Samsung’s micro LED TV’s. In a couple years OLED will be dead and phased out, just like plasma.
    [/QUOTE]
    Samsung is doing their version of OLED first I believe; everyone (literally) is working micro LEDs, but cost remains stratospheric.

    And as it stands, OLED is cheap enough for TV sizes to be ‘disposable’. You probably won’t get CRT lifetimes out of them but a decade should be easy. Smaller ones are being made and prices of those will come down soon too.

    I can’t really say I get the purpose of ‘folding’ or ‘rolling’ displays just yet though. I get the basic convenience and aesthetic advantages, just not the disadvantages of bleeding edge tech, more moving parts, and so on.

  6. What I like about micro leds is the potential to “upgrade” your tv from say a 50″ 4k to 100″ 8k or somewhere inbetween. Or go ultra wide

  7. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 30369, member: 1367″]
    Samsung is doing their version of OLED first I believe; everyone (literally) is working micro LEDs, but cost remains stratospheric.

    And as it stands, OLED is cheap enough for TV sizes to be ‘disposable’. You probably won’t get CRT lifetimes out of them but a decade should be easy. Smaller ones are being made and prices of those will come down soon too.

    I can’t really say I get the purpose of ‘folding’ or ‘rolling’ displays just yet though. I get the basic convenience and aesthetic advantages, just not the disadvantages of bleeding edge tech, more moving parts, and so on.
    [/QUOTE]

    Samsung is not doing OLED. Their latest TV’s are still quantum dot filters, but now with mini-LED full array back lighting. Micro LED is their next step in TV’s.

  8. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 30383, member: 4″]
    Samsung is not doing OLED. Their latest TV’s are still quantum dot filters, but now with mini-LED full array back lighting.
    [/QUOTE]
    I’d thought that they were working on QD-OLED.

    Of course we get deep into the technical differentiations between these technologies pretty quickly when trying to square what they ‘are’ with their marketing names, and Samsung usually makes it ten times worse (i.e., “QLED”).

  9. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 30386, member: 1367″]
    I’d thought that they were working on QD-OLED.

    Of course we get deep into the technical differentiations between these technologies pretty quickly when trying to square what they ‘are’ with their marketing names, and Samsung usually makes it ten times worse (i.e., “QLED”).
    [/QUOTE]

    QLED is QD-LED. It’s just their quantum dot filtering on their current sets. They had it back in 2014-2018 with what they called SUHD. Same shtuff, different name.

  10. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 30387, member: 4″]
    QLED is QD-LED. It’s just their quantum dot filtering on their current sets. They had it back in 2014-2018 with what they called SUHD. Same shtuff, different name.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yup, my impression was that they were trying to use Quantum Dots with an OLED-like arrangement, and with the QDs simplifying the burdens of the light sources themselves, supposedly improving on LGs implementation all around.

  11. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 30388, member: 1367″]
    Yup, my impression was that they were trying to use Quantum Dots with an OLED-like arrangement, and with the QDs simplifying the burdens of the light sources themselves, supposedly improving on LGs implementation all around.
    [/QUOTE]
    This is what I heard as well

    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.cnet.com/news/samsung-oled-tv-with-quantum-dots-could-challenge-lg-as-soon-as-next-year/[/URL]

  12. [QUOTE=”Auer, post: 30351, member: 225″]
    [LIST]

  13. Refresh rate: 1,920 Hz
  14. [/LIST]
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, I looked that up. It caught my eye too when posting this. Couldn’t find reeally clear documentation on what they’re referencing but it is a thing. Evidently not uncommon for outdoor displays(which C1 Seed specializes in) and advertising displays.
    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://bakovisionled.en.made-in-china.com/product/mKYJQVhEWxtc/China-1920-Hz-High-Refresh-Rate-Fixed-Digital-Advertising-Billboard-LED-Display.html[/URL]

  15. Many LED drivers use PWM to control brightness – my guess is that’s the frequency of their PWM driver

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