Image: Intel

Intel has announced that its Performance Tuning Protection Plan (PTPP), an extended warranty offering protection from damage that occurred during CPU overclocking, is no longer available. The company confirmed the termination of the program in a short letter on the official PTPP website, which suggested that the decision was made based on the plan’s decreasing popularity. Intel clarified that all existing plans would continue to be honored, however.

“As customers increasingly overclock with confidence, we are seeing lower demand for the Performance Tuning Protection Plans (PTPP),” Intel wrote. “As a result, Intel will no longer offer new PTPP plans effective March 1, 2021.”

“Intel will continue focusing on delivering amazing processors with tuning flexibility and overclocking tools like Intel Performance Maximizer and Intel XTU. All existing plans will continue to be honored through the duration of the processor warranty period. For questions, contact Intel Customer Support.”

Intel noted that the Xeon W-3175X processor is unaffected because the SKU is automatically covered for overclocking. As pointed out in a FAQ, the Performance Tuning Protection Plan required a separate payment that ranged from $29.99 to $19.99 depending on the type of processor.

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6 Comments

  1. I actually used this program before and it was a nice feature. Shame to lose it really.
  2. I’m not surprised it’s going away. It is in all likelihood a loss generator for Intel that isn’t heavily used by a large % of their market.
  3. Kinda surprised they are ending it — it seems like an insurance product, and that would cost very little to maintain, even if it wasn’t widely taken advantage of
  4. Kinda surprised they are ending it — it seems like an insurance product, and that would cost very little to maintain, even if it wasn’t widely taken advantage of

    Intel’s CPU’s currently have so little overhead and benefit so little from overclocking that there really isn’t a need for this.

  5. Intel’s CPU’s currently have so little overhead and benefit so little from overclocking that there really isn’t a need for this.

    I agree. So why end a program that’s essentially pure profit from people who want it

  6. I agree. So why end a program that’s essentially pure profit from people who want it

    It’s not necessarily pure profit though. While costs are likely low, they aren’t zero. They have to handle it on an administrative level, deal with claims etc. It may not be worth what little they spend on it if almost no one pays for the service. Unfortunately, I have no idea what the costs really are.

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