Conclusion

There you have it, this is what to expect from Rocket Lake 11th Gen Desktop Processors and the new series 500-series chipsets from Intel.  We will have a full review of two Rocket Lake CPUs coming at launch, plus Z590 motherboard reviews and overclocking reviews in the future. 

Here are our thoughts and opinions.  It seems to us, that Intel is trying to target some big single-core IPC increases.  In this way Intel wants to take back the crown of gaming performance, which like it or not, is still very single-core IPC and frequency oriented.  AMD has the multi-thread crown, but if Intel can edge in there somewhere and take back the single-thread crown, it can win in some areas.  By shear IPC and frequency, it is poised to do so.  Time will tell, our benchmarks will reveal this truth or not.

One thing is for sure, no amount of IPC increases will make up for the loss in cores and threads for multi-threaded applications.  Those that are using applications that take advantage of multi-threading, or doing workloads that demand multi-threading will have a disadvantage with Rocket Lake versus the competition’s higher core count.  It’s just math. 

The platform improvements are welcomed however, now we have PCIe 4.0 support across the board.  This will mean you can fire up those fast NVMe SSDs and other devices.  The improved connectivity support will also keep the platform alive.  The integrated Xe graphics actually sound promising, and we are excited to look at that.  The additions in overclocking ability will certainly delight enthusiast overclockers, it will give them something to really have fun with and aim for the highest overclocking results.  The new series 500 chipset platform seems very solid and feature full.

The Final Points

The thing we need to find out is that when compared by similar price points, where are the advantages and disadvantages going to be between Intel and AMD CPUs.  Will one favor single-core performance? Will one favor gaming performance? Will one favor multi-threading performance? These are the questions we have to find the answers to.  Therefore, take all this information into account, and stay tuned for full reviews coming at the end of this month to find out how it all stacks up.

Discussion

Brent Justice

Brent Justice has been reviewing computer components for 20+ years, educated in the art and method of the computer hardware review he brings experience, knowledge, and hands-on testing with a gamer oriented...

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6 Comments

  1. It will be interesting to see the performance reviews vs the AMD chips.

    The prices seem to be pretty decent. If it doesn’t end up a paper release.

  2. It will be interesting to see the performance reviews vs the AMD chips.

    Heat is the biggest one on my mind. If larger dies are in play, these should be easier to cool the same way AMD CPUs are easier to cool with their two- and three-die configurations that spread the heat out under the heatspreader itself.

    The prices seem to be pretty decent. If it doesn’t end up a paper release.

    I’ll be focusing on overall platform capability myself, but for strictly gaming purposes or more likely for ‘gaming first’ builds, Intel may have a ringer!

  3. This too has piqued my interests. I love it when there’s true competition between Intel and AMD. We all win when that happens!
  4. 11th Gen I guess is AMD’s FX 9590 — Guess the question becomes will Intel coming roaring back when move to 10nm or 7nm happens like AMD was able to with Ryzen — or have we reached a fork in the road where Intel short of break-through will remain in the passengers seat.

    I’m bit curious though to see how Intel’s 11th Gen does with top end 6900 XT in games at 2560×1440 – single and multi-thread games.

  5. 11th Gen I guess is AMD’s FX 9590

    This is a pretty good analogy in terms of Intel having to ‘crank it’ to produce a product that’s even competitive on paper, as was the issue with the FX / ‘dozers, though there is a bit of a difference in perspective; however far ‘behind’ Intel is, it’s not overall in the way that FX was non-competitive right out of the gate.

    Guess the question becomes will Intel coming roaring back when move to 10nm or 7nm happens like AMD was able to with Ryzen

    All indications point to them having some pretty stellar architectures that… they are unable to manufacture in volume. While the question must remain open, that if Intel cannot make the transition to full-scale production at smaller nodes the stumbling giant might just fall, the chances of that situation coming to pass seem relatively remote. If other companies have been able to ‘crack that nut’, surely Intel can.

    Right?

    or have we reached a fork in the road where Intel short of break-through will remain in the passengers seat.

    This relates to the former point about manufacturability, but it’s worth pointing out that Intel remains in the ‘driver’s’ seat out of sheer production volume at 14nm today. Most estimates I’ve come across put Intel at ten times the volume of CPUs supplied of what AMD is able to supply, and that’s when AMD is being viewed optimistically.

    Yes, there are many reasons one might prefer a Zen-based CPU right now over anything Intel has available, but the truth of the matter is that the Intel CPUs are simply ‘more available’. That’s not as much of an issue for individual enthusiasts, but it is most certainly an issue for large OEMs as well as for enterprises.

    And that doesn’t touch on the platform, driver, and software support differences and even quirks and nuances that might push a particular purchasing decision one way or the other!

    I’m bit curious though to see how Intel’s 11th Gen does with top end 6900 XT in games at 2560×1440 – single and multi-thread games.

    I’m definitely looking forward to in-depth frametime analysis of emerging platforms myself, but to be honest, I don’t see the < 4MP of 2560×1440 as being that big of a challenge for any top-end CPU these days. That’s what I’m running now myself, and with a 5.0GHz 9900K, I can’t say that I’m left wanting for CPU performance when it comes to gaming specifically.

    I’m much, much more concerned about the general market price and availability of GPUs and the price and lack of quality and quality control of ‘gaming’ monitors!

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