Image: LG

LG’s latest addition to its OLED TV family, the A1 series, starts at just $1,299. The Korean giant revealed the new lineup’s relatively cheap pricing in a press release published earlier this week, which confirmed that the 48-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, and 77-inch A1 models would cost $1,299, $1,599, $2,199, and $3,199, respectively. The 55-inch and 65-inch A1 models will be available in April 2021, while the 48-inch and 77-inch models are expected in June 2021.

“LG OLED TVs are designed, crafted, and engineered to put the spotlight on your content, yet complement your home’s interior even when they’re turned off,” the company wrote. “The C1 series, LG’s most popular OLED TV range, offers the most screen size options to accommodate diverse user needs and spaces, starting with the space-friendly 48-inch, all the way up to the expansive 83-inch model.”

“Both series include 4 inputs with HDMI 2.1 features such as support for 4K 120 content, VRR, ALLM and eARC making them the TV of choice for gamers and home theater enthusiasts alike. For customers who may not need all the gaming-related features but still desire great OLED picture quality, the A1 series offers four screen sizes from 48-to 77-inches.”

We suspect that LG’s new 48-inch A1 OLED TV might be priced as low as $999 during the holiday sales season, which could make the budget model a popular pick for PC gamers who have the desk space to turn it into a premium monitor. Note that LG’s entry-level A1 OLED TVs will only feature a 50/60 Hz panel and HDMI 2.0b connections, however—users who want a 100/120 Hz panel and HDMI 2.1 will need to step up to the B1 series or higher.

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9 Comments

  1. Shock and amazement a line of tvs who’s minimum level.of entry just so happens to perfectly fit into the stimulus package check range. I never would have expected companies to capitalize on that!

  2. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 31745, member: 215″]
    Shock and amazement a line of tvs who’s minimum level.of entry just so happens to perfectly fit into the stimulus package check range. I never would have expected companies to capitalize on that!
    [/QUOTE]
    A good point, but to be fair to LG, this is essentially where they’ve always been priced.

    Now I just need to see how well the A1 models do as monitors (i.e., all processing turned off), as that’s usually what separates LGs model lines along with the cabinet and speakers.

    If they’re ready for desktop use, I might just break down and grab a 48″ so that I can have [I]something[/I]. I’m getting really tired of crappy VAs!

  3. These just don’t seem worth it at all. 60Hz instead of 120Hz, worse processor..all for a what, $200 saving? If they were $500 cheaper then I could MAYBE see a point in getting them for a secondary TV (Bedroom, basement etc).

  4. [QUOTE=”Strelok, post: 31751, member: 237″]
    These just don’t seem worth it at all. [B]60Hz instead of 120Hz[/B], worse processor..all for a what, $200 saving? If they were $500 cheaper then I could MAYBE see a point in getting them for a secondary TV (Bedroom, basement etc).
    [/QUOTE]

    [I][B]nevermind[/B][/I]

  5. [QUOTE=”Strelok, post: 31751, member: 237″]
    These just don’t seem worth it at all. 60Hz instead of 120Hz, worse processor..all for a what, $200 saving? If they were $500 cheaper then I could MAYBE see a point in getting them for a secondary TV (Bedroom, basement etc).
    [/QUOTE]
    That was kind of my thought as well. A1 line will probably drop to <$800 by Black Friday - for a regular TV that is still an awesome set — pretty well matches Or beats the C7 I have now. And that $1200 MSRP price point is the lowest MSRP on an Lg OLED we’ve seen yet. The prices on these always drop like a rock after the Back-to-school rush. But given the option to get 120Hz for just a bit more — yeah.

  6. I know I love my C9 for just about everything so I’d have to agree that without those extra features the $200 or so off the price doesn’t make sense for most people with greater tech needs. However, for a budget OLED, around BF sales time, it could be a nice upgrade for many families.

  7. If it can still do the ‘smoothing’ up to 120Hz, I’d be fine with it as a TV. Not expecting to need more than 60Hz media playback any time soon, but then again as a TV, I would be going for something far larger.

    On the other hand, I’m a bit disappointed in the processor in my B7, as it has more artifacting when using frame smoothing than an LG I got circa 2010!

    And yeah, I’m one of those freaks that actually enjoys having the smoothing on. I don’t find it as having the offensive ‘soap-opera’ effect on the minimum setting available on my LG TVs.

  8. [QUOTE=”Strelok, post: 31751, member: 237″]
    These just don’t seem worth it at all. 60Hz instead of 120Hz, worse processor..all for a what, $200 saving? If they were $500 cheaper then I could MAYBE see a point in getting them for a secondary TV (Bedroom, basement etc).
    [/QUOTE]

    I prefer 60Hz (or technically 600Hz on plasma), 120Hz gives me a headache.

  9. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 31769, member: 1367″]
    If it can still do the ‘smoothing’ up to 120Hz, I’d be fine with it as a TV. Not expecting to need more than 60Hz media playback any time soon, but then again as a TV, I would be going for something far larger.

    On the other hand, I’m a bit disappointed in the processor in my B7, as it has more artifacting when using frame smoothing than an LG I got circa 2010!

    And yeah, I’m one of those freaks that actually enjoys having the smoothing on. I don’t find it as having the offensive ‘soap-opera’ effect on the minimum setting available on my LG TVs.
    [/QUOTE]
    I’m pretty much in the same boat. I’ll leave everything off but smoothing on if the native content is 4K or just looks great, to begin with, but with SD or poorly authored HD, I’ll more or less depending on how bad the source is, put everything on to max processing. I feel like it wasn’t until 4K that film grain managed to exist in digital w/o producing major artifacts along with it so anything less still needs more attention IMHO but I know that goes against what most purists want. I also know that many don’t want the extra interpolated frames but it’s something I’ve been doing since I used to use my old Pentium 4 rig w/ PowerDVD to watch movies on my old Trinitron(the last model they made) via S-Video. Having said all that I know what you mean about the different processors. The one in my Sony Z9D produces major ghosting when on so I pretty much leave it off no matter what. The C9 is fairly impressive by comparison. However, we’ve had a couple of HiSense 4K t.v.’s and they’ve barely made noticeable improvements or imperfections.

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