Image: Microsoft

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella once claimed that Windows 10 would be the last version of Windows. The executive may not have been entirely honest, as Microsoft published a new animated clip today for its upcoming Windows event that seems to imply its new operating system will be called Windows 11. (Despite the Windows logo comprising four separate panes, two bars of light of created, which allude to the number 11.) Popular leaker Evan Blass also seems convinced that Microsoft is developing a completely new version of Windows that will boast a new and higher number.

Microsoft’s Windows event also starts at 11AM ET, not the usual start time for typical Windows and Surface events. Following the event invite, Microsoft exec Yusuf Mehdi said he hasn’t “been this excited for a new version of Windows since Windows 95!” It’s the first time we’ve heard Microsoft specifically mention a “new version” of Windows is on the way.

Sources: Windows, The Verge, MSPowerUser

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34 Comments

  1. I thought it was going to be Windows 10 forever and ever, and they were just going to do continual update cycles?

    Reserving judgement on if it’s a good idea – really depends on what they do and how they do it – it could be great, but knowing MS, it probably won’t be and they will figure out a way to step in it. But I can certainly go ahead and criticize their lack of consistency.

  2. I dunno; Feels like every other Windows release is a bust. IE: Windows XP, good; Windows Vista, blergh; Windows 7, good; Windows 8, blergh; Windows 10, good…

  3. Ugh…… Petey you is my friend,,,,, Tell the bad man to go away

    I’m sure it’ll be fine

  4. [QUOTE=”SeymourGore, post: 35406, member: 158″]
    I dunno; Feels like every other Windows release is a bust. IE: Windows XP, good; Windows Vista, blergh; Windows 7, good; Windows 8, blergh; Windows 10, good…
    [/QUOTE]
    Vista was not as bad as it is made out to be, the real issue with it is that oems kept putting it on computers that were really ill equipped to run it.
    And windows 10 good? LOL, how can you call an OS that you have no control over good? It’s like its in constant flux and what you knew yesterday might not work tomorrow after a “feature” update that you can’t even opt out of.

  5. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35436, member: 1298″]
    Vista was not as bad as it is made out to be, the real issue with it is that oems kept putting it on computers that were really ill equipped to run it.
    And windows 10 good? LOL, how can you call an OS that you have no control over good? It’s like its in constant flux and what you knew yesterday might not work tomorrow after a “feature” update that you can’t even opt out of.
    [/QUOTE]

    I didn’t mind Vista either – 7 wasn’t that different from Vista honestly, and most people loved 7. 8 and 10 are almost identical to me, I have to look really closely to see a lot of the difference. I suffer through them because.. it’s Windows. But I never fell in love with either of them, and the fact that every time I get used something on Win10, it gets updated and changed and I have to relearn it all over agian.

  6. [QUOTE=”Dogsofjune, post: 35438, member: 168″]
    Probably be subscription based now…
    [/QUOTE]
    I wouldn’t be surprised if they give Home away, provided that you link it to your MS account – they all but do that now with 10, and they already ad-support on 10 (*grumble*). But Pro/up will probably move to a subscription — probably rolled into 365.

  7. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 35439, member: 96″]
    I didn’t mind Vista either – 7 wasn’t that different from Vista honestly, and most people loved 7. 8 and 10 are almost identical to me, I have to look really closely to see a lot of the difference. I suffer through them because.. it’s Windows. But I never fell in love with either of them, and the fact that every time I get used something on Win10, it gets updated and changed and I have to relearn it all over agian.
    [/QUOTE]
    8.1 vs 10 is close, 8 and 10 might be from different planets.
    When I first tried to use vanilla 8 it was like 1992 me sitting in front of a PC for the first time, I felt completely dumbfounded couldn’t even find the most basic functions in it.

  8. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35442, member: 1298″]
    8.1 vs 10 is close, 8 and 10 might be from different planets.
    When I first tried to use vanilla 8 it was like 1992 me sitting in front of a PC for the first time, I felt completely dumbfounded couldn’t even find the most basic functions in it.
    [/QUOTE]

    Yup I recently was working on a relatives laptop with win 8 on it and I had forgotten how much I hated it. As much as the core code is likely the same, the OS with all the charms and gestures etc makes me crazy. When I did have a Win 8 laptop back in the day, pretty sure I used start8 on it.

  9. Who wants to place bets that they go back to charging / selling Windows with this one? MS basically gave away 10 for free*. I do know they sell retail copies of it, but basically anyone with a win 7 key or newer gets off free.

    * = yeah I know they collect data, etc. But some of us know how to turn those off, or even install without them 🙂

  10. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 35460, member: 297″]
    Who wants to place bets that they go back to charging / selling Windows with this one? MS basically gave away 10 for free*. I do know they sell retail copies of it, but basically anyone with a win 7 key or newer gets off free.

    * = yeah I know they collect data, etc. But some of us know how to turn those off, or even install without them 🙂
    [/QUOTE]
    They did basically give it away for free, and I am ok with that. It is the one OS that I never paid full price for.
    I’d be hard pressed to continue paying more than $50 for future installments either, and most certainly will not go the subscription route.
    Win 10 may become the next Win 7 in longevity.

  11. If they bundle the license into office 365 subs I’m in. Otherwise not really interested.

  12. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 35476, member: 215″]
    If they bundle the license into office 365 subs I’m in. Otherwise not really interested.
    [/QUOTE]
    Office 365 is malware adware and bloatware all in one. I have office 365 enterprise through work, but I uninstalled it in favor of libreoffice.

    They are pushing onedrive in office 365 so hard now that it takes three clicks to get to an actual browse dialog to save files on the local computer in all office apps. Instead of immediately taking you to the browse dialog which office used to be like when I actually used it for productivity.

  13. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35479, member: 1298″]
    Office 365 is malware adware and bloatware all in one. I have office 365 enterprise through work, but I uninstalled it in favor of libreoffice.

    They are pushing onedrive in office 365 so hard now that it takes three clicks to get to an actual browse dialog to save files on the local computer in all office apps. Instead of immediately taking you to the browse dialog which office used to be like when I actually used it for productivity.
    [/QUOTE]
    To be fair, OneDrive [I]for business[/I] is a godsend. I don’t use it at home really at all, but it’s all I use at work.

  14. [QUOTE=”Uvilla, post: 35486, member: 397″]
    Future is ‘ as a service’ and that’s that. Not saying i like it.
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t like the [I]idea[/I] of it. But let’s be honest: should we expect security updates forever, for free?

    That’s what this boils down to, really. Security updates, feature updates, and so on to keep up with threats and evolving technology aren’t cheap. And if you can get Windows and basic productivity applications along with reasonable cloud storage for a small monthly fee? Especially when all of that goes wherever you go, including other types of computing devices like tablets and phones?

    I don’t really want to admit that I’m considering the thought, but I have to. You get what you pay for and Microsoft having desktop / consumer subscribers hitching into their services does make quite a bit of sense.

  15. I’m ok with a subscription honestly. If i think about it realistically – I’ve been doing that anyway buying the major releases. Sure, that way I have the option of not buying the next release and sitting… but honestly, do I? Once security updates and such stop, you either pay up and move on, or get obliterated in malware and left behind on driver and software support. So you only have the illusion of delaying that payment, not eliminating it.

    There are three other options, I suppose, that we aren’t really discussing.

    Most people get their OS by having it subsidized in the hardware. Windows OEM licenses, OS X, and virtually every mobile OS are funded this way. The rub there is this forum is largely made up of folks who DIY their builds, and MS no longer sells the System Builder / OEM licenses like they once did. There’s also the side issue that hardware-tied licenses don’t always get upgrades – Andriod is pretty notorious about it, and so is Microsoft with Windows – Apple is the only one I would call generous with that aspect.

    There’s Free / Open Source. That is a viable option, provided you have support for the stuff you need. Just be prepared to do a lot of your own support and for updates to happen whenever they damn well please.

    And you could do ad/data-supported, like ChromeOS. I fear a “free” version of Windows would turn into this – which would be a privacy nightmare and as annoying as all get out to use, but a lot of people don’t seem to mind at all so long as they don’t need to shell out any money.

    Given all 5 of those options, I love Apple OS longevity, but you are definitely paying for it with the Apple Tax. Yeah, when I roll my own hardware I’d prefer to buy it once and be done with it, but I’m not vehemently opposed to a subscription either. So long as it comes with the understanding that I’m already paying cash, I’m not paying with my data and/or privacy as well.

  16. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 35493, member: 96″]
    Most people get their OS by having it subsidized in the hardware. Windows OEM licenses, OS X, and virtually every mobile OS are funded this way. The rub there is this forum is largely made up of folks who DIY their builds, and MS no longer sells the System Builder / OEM licenses like they once did. There’s also the side issue that hardware-tied licenses don’t always get upgrades – Andriod is pretty notorious about it, and so is Microsoft with Windows – Apple is the only one I would call generous with that aspect.
    [/QUOTE]
    To be fair to Microsoft here, if you’d bought Windows 7 / it came with a system, you could have a fully-activated Windows 10 install for that system today. I have more than a few systems running that first came with 7 myself, and I think I paid for one of the upgrades along the way. I also ran Start…whatever to replace the 8/8.1 start ‘screen’ and anemic menus and have only really dealt with those on old Server systems.

    [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 35493, member: 96″]
    There’s Free / Open Source. That is a viable option, provided you have support for the stuff you need. Just be prepared to do a lot of your own support and for updates to happen whenever they **** well please.
    [/QUOTE]
    As much as I’d like this one, we find real quick that open-source when it comes to UIs is a cluster. Give Microsoft all the flack you want for their incremental Windows 10 UI upgrades, at least they work!

    Apple much the same here, with even less flexibility.

    I [I]will[/I] say that there are FOSS options that work pretty well and I’ve been quite happy with the Cinnamon desktop across various base distros, including Mint. I also just tossed the latest Solus Budgie into Virtualbox and I think it’s time to give that one a serious run too, on a dedicated machine of course.

    [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 35493, member: 96″]
    And you could do ad/data-supported, like ChromeOS. I fear a “free” version of Windows would turn into this – which would be a privacy nightmare and as annoying as all get out to use, but a lot of people don’t seem to mind at all so long as they don’t need to shell out any money.
    [/QUOTE]
    As far as privacy goes, if you use any modern computing device with a vendor-supported OS and say use any cloud-based services or any social media, you’re already profiled and cataloged. You’d have to have gone to Sarah Conner grade lengths to prevent that.

    [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 35493, member: 96″]
    Given all 5 of those options, I love Apple OS longevity, but you are definitely paying for it with the Apple Tax. Yeah, when I roll my own hardware I’d prefer to buy it once and be done with it, but I’m not vehemently opposed to a subscription either. So long as it comes with the understanding that I’m already paying cash, I’m not paying with my data and/or privacy as well.
    [/QUOTE]
    As with the above, privacy in a basic sense is more of a thing of the past. I don’t really know the ‘way forward’ here, as there never [I]really[/I] was real privacy even before the information age; it’s just easier to get that information today, like any information, and it’s only going to get easier.

  17. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 35487, member: 1367″]
    I don’t like the [I]idea[/I] of it. But let’s be honest: should we expect security updates forever, for free?
    [/QUOTE]
    When people start a sentence with ” to be fair” or “let’s be honest” it usually means they don’t really believe what they are going to say either.
    What was wrong with the system that you bought an OS for $80-100 used it for 3-4 years then bought the next version. Nobody asked ms to give away windows 10 for free, or to make it the “last” windows. This is a problem entirely of their own making. MS is making your computer theirs, and a subscription based OS further advances that agenda, as you will no longer be able to use your computer without constantly paying MS.

    I know it is cliché by now, but if MS really goes the subscribe or die route with consumer windows, I really expect an uptick in linux installations. And piracy.

    [QUOTE]That’s what this boils down to, really. Security updates, feature updates, and so on to keep up with threats and evolving technology aren’t cheap. And if you can get Windows and basic productivity applications along with reasonable cloud storage for a small monthly fee? Especially when all of that goes wherever you go, including other types of computing devices like tablets and phones?[/QUOTE]
    I don’t want my desktop to go anywhere especially not on my mobile devices. And I never asked for cloud storage, that I especially don’t trust, or find useful, since my upload speed is 20mbit on a good day.

  18. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 35493, member: 96″]
    I’m ok with a subscription honestly. If i think about it realistically – I’ve been doing that anyway buying the major releases. Sure, that way I have the option of not buying the next release and sitting… but honestly, do I? Once security updates and such stop, you either pay up and move on, or get obliterated in malware and left behind on driver and software support. So you only have the illusion of delaying that payment, not eliminating it.
    [/QUOTE]
    That is not nearly the same thing. In one you have a choice of when you upgrade or if you upgrade at all or did you forget skipping vista, 8, whatever?
    And at my work most computers still run Windows 7, and frankly they have the same amount of malware problems as the computers running 10: Zero.

    [QUOTE]
    There are three other options, I suppose, that we aren’t really discussing.
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t really care what options MS gives us, Windows is already pervasive enough, if the only option is to subscribe or pirate, I’ll choose the latter, not because I can’t afford a $10 subscription fee, but because I Don’t want to be an indebted servant of MS. My computer is my home, nobody else decides what I do on it when and how. The same reason I’d never buy a tesla like vehicle that they can turn features on off remotely on.

    This is really getting close to: You missed your payment deadline by 3 days, shutting down your lung in 3…2…1….

  19. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35502, member: 1298″]
    When people start a sentence with ” to be fair” or “let’s be honest” it usually means they don’t really believe what they are going to say either.
    [/QUOTE]
    Quite true, but I used the phrase honestly in this case.
    [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35502, member: 1298″]
    What was wrong with the system that you bought an OS for $80-100 used it for 3-4 years then bought the next version. Nobody asked ms to give away windows 10 for free, or to make it the “last” windows. This is a problem entirely of their own making. MS is making your computer theirs, and a subscription based OS further advances that agenda, as you will no longer be able to use your computer without constantly paying MS.
    [/QUOTE]
    Not being able to ‘use’ the computer without paying MS is probably not where they’re going with this; it’s unlikely that MS would build a model where [I]constant[/I] internet connection is required.

    The big issue is that keeping OSs updated is expensive. MS doesn’t tie OSs to purchases of MS hardware like Apple does for Mac OS, thus they need a different means to offset the cost of security updates. And that’s fair, as we consumers shouldn’t expect something for nothing.
    [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35502, member: 1298″]
    I know it is cliché by now, but if MS really goes the subscribe or die route with consumer windows, I really expect an uptick in linux installations. And piracy.
    [/QUOTE]
    There’s already an ‘uptick’, especially if you count ChromeOS (which is debatable, admittedly). But more to the point, what MS brings is what cannot be done on Linux. Even Microsoft themselves reduce that list every year but for desktop users, especially in corporate environments, there’s really very little alternative that addresses the usability, compatibility, and security infrastructure enabled by the whole Microsoft stack.

    And that security side is getting more onerous by the month; sure, Linux is probably more secure in terms of being a single exposed machine left to default settings – and that’s also pretty distribution dependent as well – but it’s not really the OS that presents the majority of risk, it’s the applications. Microsoft is no saint there either, but when most FOSS stuff is developed and managed in public repositories by semi-anonymous contributors, you get something like the SolarWinds hack happening all over again.

    [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35502, member: 1298″]
    I don’t want my desktop to go anywhere especially not on my mobile devices. And I never asked for cloud storage, that I especially don’t trust, or find useful, since my upload speed is 20mbit on a good day.
    [/QUOTE]
    Not sure what you’re getting at exactly, so I’ll clarify my point a bit: I can get full-fat MS Office on a desktop (Windows or Mac, for the moment), and then do less intensive edits or just plain viewing anywhere. That’s portability. If I were to use Linux (and the gods know I’ve tried!), I’d either have to use a less powerful / less performant web version of MS Office or deal with eventual compatibility issues. I couldn’t even get a table to come over from Word properly last time I tried OpenOffice. Promptly rebooted back into Windows.

    Again, admittedly that’s Microsoft’s fault with respect to their file formats, but on the other hand they are actually expanding features for their Office suite too.

    As far as ‘cloud’ goes, it’s really just server-side storage with integrated layers of redundancy and protection. Obviously if it’s online it’s [I]online[/I], but ‘cloud’ doesn’t mean that something has to be off-premises. Private clouds are a thing, and for example, my employer runs several inside our intranet, and has contracts for several external ones as well. Those that have been issued phones absolutely make use of the functionality.

    On a personal level, I guess it depends. Realistically your ‘information’ has already been mined; yes, putting it in the cloud makes that easier, but again, you’d have to keep your stuff air-gapped (literally) to have any chance of privacy.

  20. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35502, member: 1298″]I know it is cliché by now, but if MS really goes the subscribe or die route with consumer windows, I really expect an uptick in linux installations. And piracy.
    [/QUOTE]

    If there was a new Linux user for everytime people claim users will switch to linux en masse after every new windows version comes out, linux would have the biggest market share… :rolleyes: :rolleyes: 🤣 🤣

  21. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 35508, member: 1474″]
    If there was a new Linux user for everytime people claim users will switch to linux en masse after every new windows version comes out, linux would have the biggest market share… :rolleyes: :rolleyes: 🤣 🤣
    [/QUOTE]
    I’m still in the ‘por que no los dos’ category myself 😀

    Right tool for the job, really. If I need a GUI for applications (and not just ease of administration, where necessary), that pushes me away from Linux. If it’s a box that does [I]work[/I], then it’s probably better off on Linux, GUI or no.

    And on the XPS 15 that I’m typing on, I have installed to metal:
    [LIST]

  22. Windows 10 Pro
  23. Fedora 34 Cinnamon
  24. Ubuntu 21.04 (had to try it)
  25. Mint Cinnamon 20
  26. Parrot OS
  27. Some OpenSUSE Tumbleweed derivative
  28. [/LIST]
    Only the OpenSUSE derivative is non-functional, and that only because it decided that it no longer knows how to use the Intel WiFI module in the laptop…

  29. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 35502, member: 1298″]
    When people start a sentence with ” to be fair” or “let’s be honest” it usually means they don’t really believe what they are going to say either.
    [/QUOTE]

    I use these statements a fair bit. When I do, it’s in one of two situations, which can be related but aren’t necessarily linked:

    Either what I am trying to convey has a strong or obvious counter argument that I’m just trying to acknowledge and set aside to further the topic, and/or is just contrary to the popular opinion and I’d like folks to just pause and consider what I’m saying for a moment before just dismissing it.

    Sometimes I’m just playing devil’s advocate because the discussion is fun, but most times I do believe what it is I’m saying when I use those statements.

  30. It’s the year of Linux… To be honest, I had to say it. Lets be fair, you know it’s coming. /s

    So what [I][U][B]do[/B][/U][/I] we know about this variation? New Direct X, more ads, visually stimulating? Do we have to upgrade, or do we get the paperclip popping up every ten minutes?

    Does it come with Freecell?

  31. [QUOTE=”Dogsofjune, post: 35514, member: 168″]
    So what [I][U][B]do[/B][/U][/I] we know about this variation?
    [/QUOTE]
    Nothing, really.

    And in essence, while much has been [I]iterated [/I]since Windows 7, little has been truly changed. There’s just not much more needed from a ‘desktop’ OS, in my opinion.

    [QUOTE=”Dogsofjune, post: 35514, member: 168″]
    It’s the year of Linux… To be honest, I had to say it. Lets be fair, you know it’s coming. /s
    [/QUOTE]
    Ya gotta specific [I]desktop [/I]Linux; the year of Linux alone has long passed, as even Microsoft is using it!

  32. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 35506, member: 1367″]
    Not being able to ‘use’ the computer without paying MS is probably not where they’re going with this; it’s unlikely that MS would build a model where [I]constant[/I] internet connection is required.
    [/QUOTE]
    It’s not about constant internet requirement. It’s about constant payment. You miss an automatic payment because your card expired or whatever other reason, and you come home to find your computer reverted to a basic state, and you cannot use it properly. My computer is essential, I expect it to be available all the time, I don’t want to be at the mercy of a 3rd party whether my computer will work as expected or not. Which sadly I’m already at due to forced windows feature updates.

    [QUOTE]The big issue is that keeping OSs updated is expensive. MS doesn’t tie OSs to purchases of MS hardware like Apple does for Mac OS, thus they need a different means to offset the cost of security updates. And that’s fair, as we consumers shouldn’t expect something for nothing.[/QUOTE]
    As said, entirely a problem of their own making, nobody forced them to offer windows 10 for free, and then claim it the final windows version.

    [QUOTE]There’s already an ‘uptick’, especially if you count ChromeOS (which is debatable, admittedly). But more to the point, what MS brings is what cannot be done on Linux. Even Microsoft themselves reduce that list every year but for desktop users, especially in corporate environments, there’s really very little alternative that addresses the usability, compatibility, and security infrastructure enabled by the whole Microsoft stack.[/QUOTE]
    I’m not talking about the corporate environment, but as a home user. Most corporations already pay some sort of recurring fee, even if they use linux.

    [QUOTE]And that security side is getting more onerous by the month; sure, Linux is probably more secure in terms of being a single exposed machine left to default settings – and that’s also pretty distribution dependent as well – but it’s not really the OS that presents the majority of risk, it’s the applications. Microsoft is no saint there either, but when most FOSS stuff is developed and managed in public repositories by semi-anonymous contributors, you get something like the SolarWinds hack happening all over again.[/QUOTE]
    Being public actually helps security imo, not hinders it. In proprietary software vulnerabilities can fester for years before being exposed to the public.

    [QUOTE]Not sure what you’re getting at exactly, so I’ll clarify my point a bit: I can get full-fat MS Office on a desktop (Windows or Mac, for the moment), and then do less intensive edits or just plain viewing anywhere. That’s portability. If I were to use Linux (and the gods know I’ve tried!), I’d either have to use a less powerful / less performant web version of MS Office or deal with eventual compatibility issues. I couldn’t even get a table to come over from Word properly last time I tried OpenOffice. Promptly rebooted back into Windows.[/QUOTE]
    You said:
    [QUOTE]Especially when all of that goes wherever you go, including other types of computing devices like tablets and phones? [/QUOTE]
    That’s why I wrote I don’t want my desktop to go anywhere, what I do on my desktop stays on my desktop.
    I’ve had problems with openoffice as well, but I’ve been so satisfied with libreoffice recently that as said I gladly use it over the fully bloated office experience.

    [QUOTE]As far as ‘cloud’ goes, it’s really just server-side storage with integrated layers of redundancy and protection. Obviously if it’s online it’s [I]online[/I], but ‘cloud’ doesn’t mean that something has to be off-premises. Private clouds are a thing, and for example, my employer runs several inside our intranet, and has contracts for several external ones as well. Those that have been issued phones absolutely make use of the functionality.[/QUOTE]Cloud is just a buzzword for remote storage that you pay for, it’s not really new. And local cloud is basically just a glorified NAS. I’m not saying it is not easier to use to noobs, what I’m saying is I don’t need or want it. But ms is forcing it on me as part of the service then nagging me to use it.

    [QUOTE]
    On a personal level, I guess it depends. Realistically your ‘information’ has already been mined; yes, putting it in the cloud makes that easier, but again, you’d have to keep your stuff air-gapped (literally) to have any chance of privacy.
    [/QUOTE]
    There is a difference between your meta profile being out there or your entire data. There is no such thing as secure cloud, some admin, somewhere will have full access to your data. The only real protection is the amount of data on cloud storage which makes it unlikely for anyone to be interested in your personal files. Unless there is a targeted attack on your person. Which in today’s cancel culture is a possibility.

  33. [QUOTE=”Dogsofjune, post: 35514, member: 168″]
    It’s the year of Linux..
    [/QUOTE]

    Again…

  34. Ain’t touching office 365, ever. They can keep that glorious service for themselves. It does fascinate me how they are making millions stacked upon millions by switching to the service model. Same adobe… People love a recurring payment!! I dread them down to my bones.

  35. At this day and age, Windows should be free to all. As should broadband Internet.

    Have the Gov pay for it. With our taxes.

  36. [QUOTE=”Auer, post: 35525, member: 225″]
    At this day and age, Windows should be free to all. As should broadband Internet.

    Have the Gov pay for it. With our taxes.
    [/QUOTE]
    There is no such thing as free. You said it yourself, the Gov would have to pay it with taxes

  37. Office 365 is nice. I use excel for a lot of stuff outside of work. Really if I didn’t do that I wouldn’t need it. But I have made use of the cloud storage for documents and such. For me I find it very handy. And being able to move collections of pdfs and such to the cloud and off my local computer is actually quite nice. I suppose I’m not your typical user.

  38. Well, today is the day. Regale us Microsoft with wonderments beyond the dreams of Avarice…..

    How much is the subscription?

    [MEDIA=youtube]4xgx4k83zzc[/MEDIA]

  39. Android app in Windows? Not really new. I’ve been doing that in chrome already.

    Bringing back widgets…. Yeah

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