MSI Dragon Center

MSI has integrated the control panel for the CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS into their Dragon Center software suite. True Color and Mystic Light allow for customization of the single RGB zone underneath the MSI Dragon logo situated on the back of the mouse. Next, the Gaming Gear page lists the mouse itself; clicking on the image of the mouse launches a window with tabs for customizing button functions and sensor settings.

The Buttons tab for the CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS allows for the customization of the five buttons on the top of the mouse. Selecting one of the buttons in the list allows the function of that button to be changed. Once a button is selected, each option under the ‘Action’ menu then reveals a second menu to assign a command to the button in question.

The Macro tab allows for macro recording and provides thirty slots, each of which may be renamed for convenience. Clicking on the Editor button after selecting a macro slot brings up the Macro Editor, where macros may be recorded, edited, saved, and deleted.

The Multimedia Action list allows for the assignment of seven common media controls. DPI allows for the assignment of DPI preset selection direction, a return to the default DPI, or even a shortcut to a specific DPI level as assigned in the Sensor tab.

On the Sensor tab, the polling rate may be set between four fixed settings, the Lift-0ff Distance may be set to ‘High’ or ‘Low, Angle Snapping and Motion Sync may be toggled on or off, the five available DPI levels may be set between a minimum of 100 and a maximum of 20,000, and the battery level may be checked.

The Price

Typically, gaming mice with this level of build quality and features can command a hefty price tag, many times well north of US $100. This is MSI’s real selling point with the CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS: a US $94.99 MSRP, available at Amazon and Newegg.

The inclusion of the base station is what seems to make this possible. As a solid chunk of plastic, it sits firmly in place to host the CLUTCH GM41 LWs wireless dongle close by and also provides a convenient spot to park the mouse. After repeat usage, the base station was found to be uncomplicated to use. With its contoured top and mirrored cutout on the bottom of the CLUTCH GM41 LW, placing the mouse on the base station is as effortless as centering it on the MSI MYSTIC LIGHT RGB logo and setting it down.

MSI CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS Box, Mouse on Base Station, Rear Right Quarter Shot

The Nit Picks

MSI CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS Pretty but Janky Cable

The first is the stiffness of MSIs FriXionFree cable. The cable is strong and very handsomely braided, but in a market where most manufacturers are shipping super flexible paracord-lined cables, the use of the CLUTCH GM41 LW with the included cable attached to the mouse is different, though it does reduce tangling.

MSI CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS USB Cable Ports with Fuschia Insert

Next, while Micro-USB hasn’t been fully supplanted by USB-C, it’s clearly on the way out. In a few year’s time, the older connecter will become a harder sell, not just as consumers clear out their stashes, but the standard is less durable in design as well, with both ports and cable connectors wearing out over time and making devices difficult to use. On balance, we can’t really fault MSI much here as users are unlikely to need to plug and unplug the cable frequently, and the smaller connector size may have contributed to the CLUTCH GM41 LWs positive attributes.

Last, MSIs Dragon Center software did prove to be a pain point. Early in the review, we found that the Gaming Gear page was not available. The software was removed and reinstalled from review-provided and publicly available sources but was not easily restored. A near last-ditch effort including a manual purge of related directories finally allowed for a successful reinstallation. Without Dragon Center fully functional, only the RGB LED on the mouse was controllable.

One mitigating point we’d like to mention is that the MSI CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS is pretty sensibly set up out of the box. Common DPI levels are preloaded and polling was set to 1000Hz, so outside of a desire to adjust the LED lighting, Dragon Center isn’t strictly necessary to use the mouse.


Conclusion

Overall, MSIs newest entry into their growing stable of gaming mice comes as a welcome entry from an established brand. The wireless technology in the CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS is flawless, the battery life outstanding, and most importantly, MSI has sourced tried and true components to outfit the CLUTCH GM41 LW while keeping the pricing in check – all while providing a complete, affordable package that never skips a beat.

Our Experiences

At just 74g, verified on a calibrated kitchen scale with 0.001g precision, the CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS absolutely earns its lightweight moniker. With a solid shell, proven internals, and modern 2.4GHz wireless technology, the CLUTCH GM41 LW doesn’t skip a beat. Try as we might, the CLUTCH GM41 LW never lost its connection. It never exhibited any of the lag or wake-up delay that typifies Bluetooth mice. Testing over two weeks revealed that the mouse is natural to use on the desktop and in gaming.

MSI kept the number of buttons in check with left / right trigger buttons, forward / back thumb buttons, the mouse wheel button. The DPI button and power switch are located on the bottom of the mouse.

Being slightly heavier than it’s lightest competition, the MSI CLUTCH GM41 LW weighs in at just 5g more than Glorious’ Model O wireless. In trade, MSI brings a build that is noticeably more sturdy than its ‘holy’ brethren.

FPS Gaming

Let’s be clear on this point: the CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS can game! MSI is very clear that the CLUTCH GM41 LW is optimized for FPS gamers. Tracking is fast and linear regardless of the gaming surface used thanks to the premium PixArt PAW-3370 Optical Sensor, the crisp buttons inspire confidence when precise timing of inputs is required, and the streamlined symmetrical shape guides your fingers ergonomically into position.

This ergonomic configuration of the CLUTCH GM41 LW along with the textured rubber thumb surface and mouse wheel allows for both palm and claw grips. It is flexible to support hybrid grips as well as users that adjust their grip throughout their gaming sessions and makes MSIs latest mouse a comfortable gaming partner.

General Use

For pure gaming performance where snappy inputs are mandatory, dropping the grams is critical; however, this trend has resulted in mice that are a bit more difficult to use outside of games. The CLUTCH GM41 LW excels by having just enough substance to keep precise desktop movements under control without sacrificing in-game ‘flickability’.

And it’s not even a compromise. We found the CLUTCH GM41 LW increased desktop usability over ultralight competitors when using precise sliders in content creation. applications, for instance, which is a welcome change.

Final Points

MSI CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS Box and Contents

When it comes to mice, alongside all of the objective build quality, performance, and value attributes involved, there’s also a subjective side that’s going to vary from person to person.

We found the CLUTCH GM41 LW to be faultless while gaming. Smooth or snappy, the mouse responded in the precise, linear manner required for predictable movements necessary for FPS gaming in particular and appreciated for any genre.

Put simply, while MSIs CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS isn’t necessarily class-redefining, that’s also not a bad thing – MSI has very clearly put the industry on notice, and the CLUTCH GM41 LW is a mouse that would serve any user or gamer well and a represents a fine achievement by MSI overall!

Discussion

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MSI CLUTCH GM41 LIGHTWEIGHT WIRELESS Mouse

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John Tharp

Long-time follower of computer gaming and computer assembly from the days of the i386, photographer, husband, and lover of gaming peripherals

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17 Comments

  1. While it uses an internal battery, is it replaceable or are we looking at a dead-weight when the battery life goes to hell in a handbasket?

    1. It’s integrated into the mouse, so replacement will probably require a custom solution

  2. I want to thank everyone who checks out this review. This is our very first peripheral type review, specifically a mouse. We plan to do more of this kind in the future, expanding on peripherals. [URL=’https://www.thefpsreview.com/author/lazygamer/’]John Tharp[/URL] (LazyGamer) will be heading these reviews. Feel free to give us feedback on the review format, and testing, and feel free to ask questions and provide suggestions for future reviews. We will take note of content to add for future reviews. The review format can evolve moving forward.

  3. Product made me think of this:

    [MEDIA=youtube]X8cmbmwFAl8[/MEDIA]

    Good review – tells you about everything you can know without holding the mouse yourself.

  4. What about battery life between charges? I bought a rechargable Corsair Harpoon for a laptop and it doesnt fair well at all.
    My old Logitechs used to run forever on a AA….

    1. Depends on whether you leave the LED on, but with it left on it went several days between charges.

  5. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 35365, member: 1367″]
    It’s integrated into the mouse, so replacement will probably require a custom solution
    [/QUOTE]
    Thanks. I’m not a big fan of investing in disposable tech. Its bad enough that I am forced into it with Cell Phones. 🙁

    1. Well, if it used AA cells, there’d almost certainly need to be other compromises made, so it’s definitely a user preference thing.

      MSI was targeting users that value lower weight while keeping the battery life and build quality up.

      That they managed to include a convenient dock is just icing, and given the out of box endurance, I’d expect to get many years out of the GM41 LW.

  6. Nice review

    I have a feeling something other than the battery will be the first thing to give out. Don’t kid yourself – all peripherals are disposable. Personally I’m not a fan of wireless but they have their place. They don’t need recharging too often so battery life cycles probably won’t be a constraint.

    Being MSI, was there mention of warranty?

    1. Looks to be one year from manufacturing date:

      https://www.msi.com/page/warranty

      As far as something other than the battery failing first, it’s certainly possible.

      Only time will tell if the sum is more or less than the whole, what I can tell you is that they’re off to an impressive start!

  7. Thanks, [USER=1367]@LazyGamer[/USER], and [USER=3]@Brent_Justice[/USER] for getting this rolling. Gaming peripherals are a complex market and I’m looking forward to learning a lot more about them. So much has changed over the decades and it has expanded greatly.

  8. Very nice review. Also I am glad to hear that you will be expanding into peripherals.
    One thing I would like to see done in mouse reviews is size comparisons via pictures. Helps give people some perspective when looking to buy a new mouse. I hated that part when I was looking for a new mouse. The numbers don’t always tell you everything about its size.

  9. [QUOTE=”IKV1476, post: 35489, member: 22″]
    Very nice review. Also I am glad to hear that you will be expanding into peripherals.
    One thing I would like to see done in mouse reviews is size comparisons via pictures. Helps give people some perspective when looking to buy a new mouse. I hated that part when I was looking for a new mouse. The numbers don’t always tell you everything about its size.
    [/QUOTE]
    So, my SO is my primary photographer (I’m technical, they’re artistic), and that’s actually on the list, thanks for the suggestion!

  10. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 35485, member: 87″]
    Thanks, [USER=1367]@LazyGamer[/USER], and [USER=3]@Brent_Justice[/USER] for getting this rolling. Gaming peripherals are a complex market and I’m looking forward to learning a lot more about them. So much has changed over the decades and it has expanded greatly.
    [/QUOTE]

    Just so annoying these things are so damn subjective, I found some of the best reviewed mice to be complete garbage in my hands (looking at you G502).

  11. [QUOTE=”Denpepe, post: 35548, member: 284″]
    Just so annoying these things are so **** subjective, I found some of the best reviewed mice to be complete garbage in my hands (looking at you G502).
    [/QUOTE]
    I know how you feel!

    Some of the best mice I’ve ever gamed with myself have been some of the cheapest, usually because they were the smallest and thus the lightest. Still, while it’s difficult to distill something as personal as an input device into a broadly applicable review, we’re trying to do just that.

    A big part of that is focusing on size and weight, in addition to things like sensor performance, fit and finish, and software customization. Having owned quite a few Logitech 500-series mice myself, there’s two basic observations I can give: first, they’re quite nice especially for their price bracket, being solidly built with proven components, and second, they’re large and they’re heavy.

    That first point tends to overwhelm the second for many media, and when it comes to comparing mice in terms of ounces or grams, the differences on paper don’t seem to reflect the impact of significantly higher or lower weight, in my opinion. So we’ll try to address that too.

  12. [QUOTE=”Denpepe, post: 35548, member: 284″]
    Just so annoying these things are so **** subjective, I found some of the best reviewed mice to be complete garbage in my hands (looking at you G502).
    [/QUOTE]

    Strangely always found MS peripheral hardware to be really good actually which is kind of weird.

  13. When Microsoft put the Intellimouse back on sale, I grabbed two for my father. They’d been a long-time favorite of his.

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