Image: LG

U.S. owners of LG’s new G1 OLED TVs can rest assured that their premium “evo” television panels will receive service for years to come. As noted in an updated warranty card, LG has extended the limited panel warranty of its 55-, 65-, and 75-inch G1 TVs to five years, the first of which covers not only parts but labor. Unfortunately, LG’s verbiage is cryptic and doesn’t confirm whether its warranty covers one of the biggest purported problems with OLED technology—image burn-in. While Engadget did manage to receive a statement from LG, the company seems to be avoiding being too specific. LG’s next-generation OLED evo panels reportedly offer 20 percent higher brightness levels than its standard OLED panels.

Image: LG

“LG’s five-year limited warranty program is in line with the company’s consistent communication regarding the low risk of image retention on LG OLED TVs, when used in normal viewing conditions,” a spokesperson for the company told Engadget. “As with any self-emitting display, OLED TVs may experience temporary image retention under certain conditions, but permanent image retention, or burn-in, is rare under normal viewing conditions. Image retention is not a product defect.”

Sources: LG, Engadget

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2 Comments

  1. MSI needs to take notes. This is something being made to a quality exceeding the manufacturers estimates. Makes me want to get one of these. Same reason I won’t be looking at future MSI product unless I have no reasonable choice.

  2. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 36047, member: 215″]
    MSI needs to take notes. This is something being made to a quality exceeding the manufacturers estimates. Makes me want to get one of these. Same reason I won’t be looking at future MSI product unless I have no reasonable choice.
    [/QUOTE]
    Hmm.. I remember when the G-series was nearly twice the cost of the B series. There used to be a difference in that the higher end screens used actual glass over the front, and the lower (including C-series) were plastic. I don’t know if that’s the case any longer though.

    The G’s are still more expensive, but much more reasonable. A 55″ G1 is about $2,000, the C1 runs $1,600, the A1 (no longer the B-series, and is limited to 60Hz, so not as desirable any longer) is $1,400. I don’t know if the Evo screen is bright enough to make it $400 more, but throw in the extra warranty and it starts to look a bit more attractive.

    So that isn’t a terrible product lineup for OLED, and you see some nice differentiation in the line now (other than the built-in speakers and mounting).

    A-series has that nice OLED screen for the least amount of money. C-series adds 120Hz, VRR, and a faster processor. G-series adds a brighter panel and 4 additional years on warranty.

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