Image: Western Digital

Western Digital has begun advising owners of its WD My Book Live units to unplug them from the internet following a wave of complaints stemming from its support forum regarding total and unrecoverable data loss. As explained by a number of frustrated users (and later confirmed by Western Digital in a statement), WD My Book Live units around the world have wiped themselves after a threat actor managed to compromise the devices and triggered a factory reset that erased all of their data. Unfortunately, recovery efforts have reportedly been in vain. Western Digital discontinued its My Book Live products in 2015.

Image: Western Digital

We have determined that some My Book Live devices have been compromised by a threat actor. In some cases, this compromise has led to a factory reset that appears to erase all data on the device. The My Book Live device received its final firmware update in 2015.

Sources: Western Digital, Ars Technica, Bleeping Computer

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5 Comments

  1. The track record WD external drives for me has not been good so I mostly steer clear anymore. Had two different self-powered external ones die in the same year and each was 6-18 months old. I’ve got a USB-powered one that’s mostly been o.k. but it gave me some grief(controller died but I had a USB-SATA adapter that worked, broke open the case, and attached the drive to it) a while back so I really don’t trust it after the other two.

    On the bright side, we’ve got a WD red in our Kodi box and it’s pretty happy. I’ve also got a white label drive from NewEgg that turned out to be a WD of some sort and it’s been chugging along just fine. Seems like the majority of my bad luck has been with their external green/blue and USB drives.

  2. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 36626, member: 87″]
    The track record WD external drives for me has not been good so I mostly steer clear anymore. Had two different self-powered external ones die in the same year and each was 6-18 months old. I’ve got a USB-powered one that’s mostly been o.k. but it gave me some grief(controller died but I had a USB-SATA adapter that worked, broke open the case, and attached the drive to it) a while back so I really don’t trust it after the other two.

    On the bright side, we’ve got a WD red in our Kodi box and it’s pretty happy. I’ve also got a white label drive from NewEgg that turned out to be a WD of some sort and it’s been chugging along just fine. Seems like the majority of my bad luck has been with their external green/blue and USB drives.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, I’ve had decent luck with WD drives (nothing extraordinary, Hitachi and Toshiba have been rock stars in that regard, although HGST has been owned by WD for a few years now). I did have a batch of WD Reds die early on me – but that was back when Newegg was shipping them bare without any protection. Seagate, on the other hand, I won’t touch any more.

    Their external enclosures though – yeah. Poor. I have an older TB3 enclosure for a mac that has done well, but anything USB-based just seems to die, and it’s usually the junk electronics in the box, not the drive itself. Their online/cloud/NAS thing – utter junk.

  3. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 36636, member: 96″]
    electronics in the box, not the drive itself.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep that’s what I’ve found out too. It’s a shame I never tried to pry open those other ones to see if they could be salvaged. I only took the chance with the USB one because it was a USB 3.0 and I’d seen how other manufacturers usually used adapters paired to laptop class drives. I was just hoping it was soldered, and thankfully it wasn’t. It’s still working now paired with a Sabrent USB>Sata adapter I had for some other projects.

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