Image: Intel

Something that Intel is keen on introducing as part of its upcoming Intel Z690 motherboards for 12th Gen Core “Alder Lake” processors is support for a new power standard called ATX12VO that promises reduced idle desktop power for lower energy use. Recent reports suggest that many motherboard manufacturers couldn’t care less and have opted to retain the traditional 24-pin ATX12V specification for their upcoming products, however. According to one insider, Yuuki_ans, some manufacturers are merely offering ATX12VO to ATX12V adapter boards, while others, more humorously, have designed a single ATX12VO motherboard that won’t actually be released and exists solely to meet Intel’s alleged requirement that there must be at least one board supporting its new power standard. Two ATX12VO motherboards that are already available on the market are MSI’s Z590 PRO and ASRock’s Z590 Phantom Gaming 4SR.

Featuring support for Alder Lake Desktop CPUs, the Z690 motherboards were going to adopt the new standard which is shown to reduce idle power by half, but the power efficiency gains are not as significant as power increases all the way up to a full load. To get ATX12VO running, you would need a proper PSU & a motherboard with the necessary power connectors. This is just too much of an upgrade for existing users and could be one of the many reasons why motherboard makers are deciding against using the standard.

Source: Yuuki_ans (via Wccftech)

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14 Comments

  1. Intel doesn’t have the clout they once did. It’s going to be a hard battle for them to win.

    Honestly, I wish it would get some support, I think it’s a good idea. But unless the OEMs adopt it en masse (and maybe they will, look at the articles saying some models are barred from states due to energy efficiency — this could help), and it becomes a more-than-just-Intel chipset feature…. I don’t think it will. No one is interested in needing to buy specific PSUs based on your preference in CPU manufacturer – and there is no technical reason it should either, just licensing and other nonsense that would force it to be that way.

  2. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 38509, member: 96″]
    Intel doesn’t have the clout they once did. It’s going to be a hard battle for them to win.

    Honestly, I wish it would get some support, I think it’s a good idea. But unless the OEMs adopt it en masse (and maybe they will, look at the articles saying some models are barred from states due to energy efficiency — this could help), and it becomes a more-than-just-Intel chipset feature…. I don’t think it will. No one is interested in needing to buy specific PSUs based on your preference in CPU manufacturer – and there is no technical reason it should either, just licensing and other nonsense that would force it to be that way.
    [/QUOTE]

    I agree.

    Intel is used to being able to push these things, and the industry just follows because they have to. That may not be the case anymore.

    I agree with you, that the goals of ATX12VO are positive, but part of the problem has to be that users are used to reusing their power supplies for many years. Most of the motherboard manufacturers customers already have power supplies, and they are not ATX12VO power supplies. The board makers have to do what they can to not alienate their customers.

    I think the transition will come eventually, especially if they ease us in with an adapter board.

    One thing I don’t know though is, is this a proprietary standard? Could it be used for AMD motherboards as well? If not, it should die in a fire and be replaced with an open standard.

  3. The reason they are balking at this is simple: Motherboard manufacturers know they won’t sell nearly as many motherboards when a power supply upgrade has to go with it.

  4. Oh noes, think of the Californians……

    I suppose an update to standards has to happen eventually. As mentioned why wouldn’t an adapter work in the interim?

  5. From what I have seen from SI reviews those that use proprietary motherboards are already on the new standard. So it won’t be too long before others jump over.

  6. WHy would they jump? They don’t want to loose out on business, forcing a PSU upgrade makes their board less attractive. At the least they’d have to make two version to not get a disadvantage in the marketplace. But at that point why even waste R&D on a version that will be outsold 100:1 by regular 24pin boards?

  7. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 38553, member: 1367″]
    If 12V is 12V… provide an adapter?
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t think it’s that easy, the control signals and lines are different too, and I don’t think many PSUs would be particularly happy with zero load on 5V lines. At least back in the old days experts always said don’t use a PSU with zero load on any of its rails.

    And at that point we are probably talking active adapter that is not $1 to make.

  8. This will actually be easy for some manufacturers to do.

    Motherboard+PSU+video card bundles. They already bundle everything else with a video card. Why not do near a full system? Then you would guarantee compatibility across the board.

  9. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 38584, member: 215″]
    This will actually be easy for some manufacturers to do.

    Motherboard+PSU+video card bundles. They already bundle everything else with a video card. Why not do near a full system? Then you would guarantee compatibility across the board.
    [/QUOTE]
    I’m ok with that in so long as that isn’t the ~Only~ way to get compatibility… which is where I fear that may lead.

  10. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 38604, member: 96″]
    I’m ok with that in so long as that isn’t the ~Only~ way to get compatibility… which is where I fear that may lead.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yea I’ll have to agree with you there it does have slippery slope disease.

  11. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 38584, member: 215″]
    This will actually be easy for some manufacturers to do.

    Motherboard+PSU+video card bundles. They already bundle everything else with a video card. Why not do near a full system? Then you would guarantee compatibility across the board.
    [/QUOTE]
    So instead of just having to buy a new psu you force them to buy a new GPU as well? LOL I rarely if ever upgraded the CPU+MB and the GPU at the same time even when GPU prices were a fraction of what they are now.

  12. I’m not replacing my Seasonic 1000 any time soon. So unless Seasonic comes out with an adapter I won’t be adopting this new method.

  13. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 38618, member: 1298″]
    So instead of just having to buy a new psu you force them to buy a new GPU as well? LOL I rarely if ever upgraded the CPU+MB and the GPU at the same time even when GPU prices were a fraction of what they are now.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yet as video card prices come down minorly incentivised bundles will look like great deals.

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