Introduction

What follows is an opinion piece, it is a short editorial based on our experience and performance of the new Radeon RX 6600 XT from AMD.  Our opinion is formed after fully testing the Radeon RX 6600 XT’s performance, and comparing video cards by official MSRP launch pricing.  Our metric, our yardstick, throughout this editorial will be based on the official MSRP. While we understand street prices will be different, we have to use a metric that is comparable, street prices are unpredictable and will change over time, the way to do that is to compare by the official MSRP.

Please check out our AMD Radeon RX 6600 XT Introduction article and our XFX SPEEDSTER MERC 308 Radeon RX 6600 XT Black video card review.

Price Conundrum

It feels odd to talk about pricing, considering 2020 and 2021’s problems with demand and shortages.  However, it is a topic we need to bring up as it pertains to the Radeon RX 6600 XT’s current pricing.  Before we talk about the Radeon RX 6600 XT’s pricing, we do need to acknowledge some facts about the state of pricing today.  This is in no way shape or form a comprehensive evaluation of the state of the industry. 

There is a silicon shortage, and specifically a substrate shortage, this is real.  There is a higher demand for parts, this is real.  There are higher prices on parts, this is real.  Memory prices and demand for video cards have gone up, and material prices for video cards have gone up.  The cost of copper, plastics, and other metals that go into the entire package of a video card, has gone up.  All of these things add up, and it affects pricing.  These are known, and we acknowledge them as we state our opinion below.

MSRP stands for Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price.  AMD does make its own made by AMD video cards that are sold directly on AMD.com.  However, with the Radeon RX 6600 XT AMD is leaving it up to add-in-board partners.  That said, the MSRP that AMD states for its GPUs make an impact.  When AMD puts a video card on its website for sale, at a specific price, it sets a benchmark for that price.  The precedence that is set by AMD specifying an MSRP affects add-in-board partner pricing.  Therefore, the MSRP that AMD (or anyone else for that matter) states is important. 

The Radeon RX 6600 XT Is Priced Too High

The AMD Radeon RX 6600 XT’s MSRP of $379 is too high.  Let’s go over a little history lesson of pricing. 

The AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT was launched in 2019 at $399 MSRP and touted as the 1440p gaming card. 

The AMD Radeon RX 5700 was launched in 2019 at $349 MSRP and also touted as the 1440p gaming card. 

The AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT was launched in 2020 at $279 MSRP and touted as the 1080p gaming card. 

In 2019, the AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT was positioned as the best GPU for 1440p gaming.  That’s right, the Radeon RX 5700 XT at $399 was positioned as the 1440p gaming card.  The video card that was positioned as the 1080p gaming card was the Radeon RX 5600 XT, which launched in early 2020.  You know what its MSRP was?  That’s right, only $279 MSRP.

However, two years later, AMD is positioning the AMD Radeon RX 6600 XT as the 1080p gaming card, but you know what it is asking for it now?  That’s right, $379 MSRP.  The 1080p gaming card has for some reason jumped up in price by $100 two years later.

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Brent Justice

Brent Justice has been reviewing computer components for 20+ years, educated in the art and method of the computer hardware review he brings experience, knowledge, and hands-on testing with a gamer oriented...

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55 Comments

  1. I am guessing that down the line, once prices stabilize, then AMD will release a 24 CU RX 6600 for $280

    And at beginning of next year, release a 4gb RX 6500 for ~ $140 to $180

  2. This pricing discussion is interesting, but it feels wrong to base the discussion on bait and switch MSRPs. The point, it seems, is that you would have been happy had the MSRP been listed at $279, even if all the actual sale prices were in the 379-500 range. This is much like the unrealistically low 3060ti MSRP, even though you will never find a 3060ti within $200 of its MSRP.

    Its not bad to have the discussion on MSRP on products even occationaly available at MSRP, but given today’s reality, you should compare the MSRP 6600XT to current AIB prices, Ebay sales, and / or new egg shuffle combo prices of competing products. Today’s actual price in the New Egg Shuffle of multiple 6600XTs is between $379 and $549, with most models being at or under $419. Yesterday’s 3060 shuffle prices were, if I remember correctly, all over $550.

    Edit to say, the way AMD could have really “won” this MSRP battle then, would be to put the MSRP at $179, but only release a couple dozen cards at that price and let the AiB Partners charge the 379-549n price. The press would have been all over AMD crushing it at MSRP, while the reality would be no different that what we see with Nvidia cards. I don’t think we really want to encourage that behavior, but maybe that is the way to marketing success?

  3. I get the sense that AMD has increased their MSRP for some of the cards in this generation (6600 XT, 6700 XT, and somewhat on the 6800) above the price points that they initially targeted due to the ongoing shortages. I think that NVIDIA has left their MSRPs alone (other than the 3080 Ti, which I suspect was bumped $200 prior to launch). Of course, I have no evidence to offer to prove my spidey sense on this one.

    MSRP is purely an academic study at this point – actual street prices (other than the rare as hen’s teeth NV/AMD built cards) have been all over the place. MSRP won’t matter until retailers have their shelves stocked across the entire product line from both companies and prices return to the ballpark of MSRP. That’s the point you’ll see MSRP (and street price) adjustments made to be more competitive. We’ve still got a ways to go before then.

  4. [QUOTE=”David_Schroth, post: 39394, member: 1″]
    I get the sense that AMD has increased their MSRP for some of the cards in this generation (6600 XT, 6700 XT, and somewhat on the 6800) above the price points that they initially targeted due to the ongoing shortages. I think that NVIDIA has left their MSRPs alone (other than the 3080 Ti, which I suspect was bumped $200 prior to launch). Of course, I have no evidence to offer to prove my spidey sense on this one.

    MSRP is purely an academic study at this point – actual street prices (other than the rare as hen’s teeth NV/AMD built cards) have been all over the place. MSRP won’t matter until retailers have their shelves stocked across the entire product line from both companies and prices return to the ballpark of MSRP. That’s the point you’ll see MSRP (and street price) adjustments made to be more competitive. We’ve still got a ways to go before then.
    [/QUOTE]
    The msrp pricing of the 3080 & 3070 had seemed too good to be true for me.

    I am guessing Nvidia pushed their cards one tier lower when they got wind of increased competitiveness from AMD

    So the chip meant for 3080 ti was released as 3080 & likewise the 3070 has performance of 2080ti at half the price. Thats absurd & unrealistic !!!

  5. [QUOTE=”David_Schroth, post: 39394, member: 1″]
    MSRP is purely an academic study at this point
    [/QUOTE]
    I would say the only thing they matter for now is public sentiment.

    With a low MSRP and high street prices, everyone just blames scalpers and AIBs for high prices. If you set a high MSRP though, they will blame you for high prices.

  6. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 39396, member: 96″]
    I would say the only thing they matter for now is public sentiment.

    With a low MSRP and high street prices, everyone just blames scalpers and AIBs for high prices. If you set a high MSRP though, they will blame you for high prices.
    [/QUOTE]
    Bingo! We have a winner!

  7. To swing back around to MSRP vs Actual price, I had a window open to yesterday’s New Egg Shuffle.

    3060: MSI Gaming X Trio – 559.99
    3060ti: MSI Gaming X – 733.98, combo’d with OLOy ram
    3070: MSI Gaming Z Trio – 809.99
    3070ti: MSI Gaming X Trio – 979.99

    If you compare today’s Shuffle lowest 6600XT Price ($379) to the $559 3060 or the $733 3060ti, the 6600XT is a bargain in comparison.

  8. [SIZE=7][B]The end of retail scalping? RX 6600 XT launch prices were much better than expected[/B][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=6][B]We could actually buy cards at AMD’s £329 SRP[/B][/SIZE]

    [URL]https://overclock3d.net/news/gpu_displays/the_end_of_retail_scalping_rx_6600_xt_launch_prices_were_much_better_than_expected/1[/URL]

  9. Even AT the MSRP is still too high, my point is, the MSRP itself is too high.

    And my other main point is, the 1080p gaming card segment has been moved up in price, what used to be a sub-$300 market, is now a sub-$400 market. 1080p gaming, for some reason, has gotten more expensive, that just doesn’t make sense IMO.

    That’s really the bigger issue I want to bring up here, how 1080p gaming and 1440p gaming segments have been moved up $80-$100 over the last several years.

    I remember when $200 was the “sweet spot” AMD and NVIDIA wanted to target. Now? They are reluctant to release the low-end cards.

  10. I think we are probably at the point where IGP can play most games at 1080, at least at some level. But I don’t think we are at the point where IGP has eliminated the <$250 market. You have a very wide price gap and performance gap between a computer running on IGP and one on entry level DGP right now.

  11. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39403, member: 3″]
    Even AT the MSRP is still too high, my point is, the MSRP itself is too high.

    And my other main point is, the 1080p gaming card segment has been moved up in price, what used to be a sub-$300 market, is now a sub-$400 market. 1080p gaming, for some reason, has gotten more expensive, that just doesn’t make sense IMO.

    That’s really the bigger issue I want to bring up here, how 1080p gaming and 1440p gaming segments have been moved up $80-$100 over the last several years.

    I remember when $200 was the “sweet spot” AMD and NVIDIA wanted to target. Now? They are reluctant to release the low-end cards.
    [/QUOTE]
    Great, but it doesn’t matter what the MSRP is when the actual baseline price is set by MH/s. AMD could set the MSRP at $50 and it would be meaningless.

  12. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39405, member: 1041″]
    Great, but it doesn’t matter what the MSRP is when the actual baseline price is set by MH/s. AMD could set the MSRP at $50 and it would be meaningless.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah but if they set the MSRP at $50 – everyone would be talking about what a great deal it was – if they could only get one.

    Instead, we are talking about how the 3060Ti looks like a better deal – if we could only get one.

    so when we do go out to look for video cards – now we have ingrained that the 3060Ti is a better deal, and we will go looking for that over a 6600. And when the street price for a 3060Ti is higher than a 6600 – we think “oh well, it’s a better deal so that’s ok”

    not to mention all the folks that won’t differentiate between a 3060 and 3060Ti. Or that just buy nVidia without even looking at anything else.

    this was a horrible move by AMD

  13. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39405, member: 1041″]
    Great, but it doesn’t matter what the MSRP is when the actual baseline price is set by MH/s. AMD could set the MSRP at $50 and it would be meaningless.
    [/QUOTE]

    The precedent of MSRP set by AMD and NVIDIA does matter. In the case of AMD, they make and sell direct on their site the reference cards (except the 6600 XT, which is kinda my point.) The MSRP set is a reference board for manufacturers, it’s a benchmark by which they set their prices. However, since the 6600 XT is a partner-only card, manufacturers can honestly set whatever pricing they want.

    Even if you remove everything above, the fact is, the 5700 XT’s was $399 and geared for the 1440p game experience, the 5600 XT was $279 and geared for the 1080p game experience, the 6600 XT’s MSRP is $379 and geared for the 1080p game experience, you can at least compare them AMD MSRP to AMD MSRP. The 6600 XT is as fast as the 5700 XT, and only $20 less, what used to be sub $300 for 1080p, is now sub $400 for 1080p. /shrug

  14. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39409, member: 3″]
    The precedent of MSRP set by AMD and NVIDIA does matter. In the case of AMD, they make and sell direct on their site the reference cards (except the 6600 XT, which is kinda my point.) The MSRP set is a reference board for manufacturers, it’s a benchmark by which they set their prices. However, since the 6600 XT is a partner-only card, manufacturers can honestly set whatever pricing they want.

    Even if you remove everything above, the fact is, the 5700 XT’s was $399 and geared for the 1440p game experience, the 5600 XT was $279 and geared for the 1080p game experience, the 6600 XT’s MSRP is $379 and geared for the 1080p game experience, you can at least compare them AMD MSRP to AMD MSRP. The 6600 XT is as fast as the 5700 XT, and only $20 less, what used to be sub $300 for 1080p, is now sub $400 for 1080p. /shrug
    [/QUOTE]

    In another year or so 1080p cards might be available for around $200 😉

    [URL]https://www.hardwaretimes.com/lower-end-amd-rdna-3-graphics-cards-rx-7500-xt-and-below-may-be-refreshes-of-rdna-2/amp/?__twitter_impression=true[/URL]

  15. BTW is it at all possible to get a RX6600XT anywhere near MSRP? at least you can get nvidia FE cards from best buy at MSRP if you ever find one.

  16. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 39415, member: 1474″]
    BTW is it at all possible to get a RX6600XT anywhere near MSRP? at least you can get nvidia FE cards from best buy at MSRP if you ever find one.
    [/QUOTE]
    Reports of 6600XT being available briefly for msrp In Germany & UK

    [URL]https://www.hardwaretimes.com/amd-radeon-rx-6600-xt-prices-are-quite-close-to-msrp-across-most-global-markets-ample-availability/amp/?__twitter_impression=true[/URL]

  17. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 39415, member: 1474″]
    BTW is it at all possible to get a RX6600XT anywhere near MSRP? at least you can get nvidia FE cards from best buy at MSRP if you ever find one.
    [/QUOTE]
    There are currently at least 30 6600XTs available at my nearest microcenter. 25+ are Red Devils at $399, and the remainder seem to be the 549 Asus variants. First time I’ve seen a launch day card actually make it to be listed on the microcenter website since the 3090 launch (not that any 3090s made it, either, just saying when I started watching)

    edit to say 399 seems like a pretty good deal compared to the other cards in stock. Below the 6600XT is a 1050ti for 299, and next card above it is a 6700XT for $829.

  18. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 39414, member: 1474″]
    Basing your entire article in MSRP is a MOO point. 😉 😉
    [/QUOTE]

    I understand what you are saying. However, it is the only measurement reviewers can rely on, street prices fluctuate, and change over time, and are unpredictable. MSRP is a yardstick that is predictable. And let’s face it, it is the suggested price from AMD and NVIDIA for these GPUs, the yardstick they put in the sand, matters a lot. Reviewers have to rely on a predictable metric for comparison. Our reviews stay permanent for years to come on the website, so the only way to provide a measure of relevance is to rely on the MSRP for comparison. This is not something new, it’s quite understood, and should be of no surprise.

    The editorial isn’t about if MSRP matters or not, that’s an entirely different discussion.

  19. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39418, member: 3″]
    I understand what you are saying. However, it is the only measurement reviewers can rely on, street prices fluctuate, and change over time, and are unpredictable. MSRP is a yardstick that is predictable. And let’s face it, it is the suggested price from AMD and NVIDIA for these GPUs, the yardstick they put in the sand, matters a lot. Reviewers have to rely on a predictable metric for comparison. Our reviews stay permanent for years to come on the website, so the only way to provide a measure of relevance is to rely on the MSRP for comparison. This is not something new, it’s quite understood, and should be of no surprise. To further, the editorial isn’t about if MSRP matters or not, that’s an entirely different discussion.
    [/QUOTE]
    It mattered when products were on the shelf at those prices. Relying on MSRP when they aren’t real prices open you up to manipulation as mentioned early in the thread. You’d be celebrating a 249 msrp (or whatever arbitrary non sale number you want to pick) and it would be just as meaningless as trying to find anything NVidia at those prices. I’ll bet the current $299 for a 1050ti is above the original MSRP as well, but it appears to be the real price if you want to go out and buy one.

  20. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39418, member: 3″]
    I understand what you are saying. However, it is the only measurement reviewers can rely on, street prices fluctuate, and change over time, and are unpredictable. MSRP is a yardstick that is predictable. And let’s face it, it is the suggested price from AMD and NVIDIA for these GPUs, the yardstick they put in the sand, matters a lot. Reviewers have to rely on a predictable metric for comparison. Our reviews stay permanent for years to come on the website, so the only way to provide a measure of relevance is to rely on the MSRP for comparison. This is not something new, it’s quite understood, and should be of no surprise.

    The editorial isn’t about if MSRP matters or not, that’s an entirely different discussion.
    [/QUOTE]
    Had it been $299 it would still be a moo point (sorry can’t stop). Just like it had been for every other card out today, it doesn’t matter if the price is “right” like say the RTX3060Ti or complete bunkers like the RTX3090 you just cant get them at anywhere near MSRP if at all.

    I think AMD set the price at $379 simply because they can. A higher MSRP means they are selling GPUs at a higher price to AIBs. They are just taking advantage of the current market.

  21. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 39425, member: 1474″]
    I think AMD set the price at $379 simply because they can.
    [/QUOTE]

    AMD used to be the underdog.

    Now they want to be the topdog.

    For next gen they are reportedly focusing more on 4K
    1440 low & 1080 high are likely to be served by rebadged RDNA 2 cards !!!

  22. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 39425, member: 1474″]
    Had it been $299 it would still be a moo point (sorry can’t stop). Just like it had been for every other card out today, it doesn’t matter if the price is “right” like say the RTX3060Ti or complete bunkers like the RTX3090 you just cant get them at anywhere near MSRP if at all.

    I think AMD set the price at $379 simply because they can. A higher MSRP means they are selling GPUs at a higher price to AIBs. They are just taking advantage of the current market.
    [/QUOTE]
    Higher MSRP may actually mean that gamers get some. I’ve read that the 6600XT doesn’t make sense for mining if the price is over $450 due to the length of time for payoff. In that case, the OC models probably aren’t going to get hoovered up by miners, and supply may be high enough that scalpers can’t justify it. So far all of the above seem plausible, given there are some on the shelf at microcenter.

  23. Folks, if we show them that we will pay high prices for video cards, well beyond their MSRP, then that is exactly what you are going to get for the next generation. Prices are going to go up, cause they now know you’ll pay for it.

    No. prices do not go up because they know we will pay for it. Prices were set by the market before the shortage, and this hasn’t changed. Maximize profit. Higher prices does not automatically mean more profit. The market has changed, prices have changed. Someone out there will pay 10k for a 6600 xt if they are given no other choice. Is AMD going to increase the price to 10k now?

    You make it sound like before this current shortage AMD could have set their cards higher and increased their profit. No, instead everyone would just stop buying AMD and go to nvidia instead and AMD would lose. But since Nvidia and AMD are having the same problem this is not a current possibility.

    The current value of cards reflects what consumers are willing to spend for them given current supply. It’s nice that AMD is giving a more realistic MSRP. The MSRP on every other card is a joke right now. Hopefully AMD also gets more revenue from this too, instead of a large chunk of it going to middlemen, but I’m not clear on if this is the case or not.

    Maybe things will re stabilize and actual prices will realign with unrealisticly low MSRPs, but until (if?) that happens I prefer an MSRP that tells me roughly what I should expect to buy the card for.

    I dont know how you can do you reviews with cost in mind. Maybe have some sort of comparison system: If buyer can find 6600xt within 1.3 times the price of 3060 then it is a good deal? Can you do some sort of amazon automatic price checker script system for each review?

  24. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 39425, member: 1474″]
    I think AMD set the price at $379 simply because they can. A higher MSRP means they are selling GPUs at a higher price to AIBs. They are just taking advantage of the current market.
    [/QUOTE]

    No doubt. They also did it with Zen 3. Do you want them to continue to do that, however?

  25. [QUOTE=”serpretetsky, post: 39433, member: 4634″]
    I dont know how you can do you reviews with cost in mind. Maybe have some sort of comparison system: If buyer can find 6600xt within 1.3 times the price of 3060 then it is a good deal? Can you do some sort of amazon automatic price checker script system for each review?
    [/QUOTE]

    This is an editorial, not a review.

    In our reviews, we have swayed away from discussing price too much since this epidemic of pricing.

    What you propose is interesting, but ultimately arbitrary and without meaning. We can’t just ‘make up’ a number to say it’s good or bad.

    MSRP is set by AMD and NVIDIA, and the metric which makes sense to compare with. One day, when pricing levels out to normal (if it does) and is back to MSRP, then these reviews today will still be relevant for people to make up their mind on what GPU fits them best. And when the 6600 XT is at MSRP, I will still say it’s a bad value and priced too high.

    And I guarantee you, AMD and NVIDIA are looking at the prices people are paying for video cards right now, and it’s got them thinking, they are thinking mmm, if they will pay that much, maybe we should raise the MSRP even higher next go-around.

  26. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39444, member: 3″]
    This is an editorial, not a review.

    In our reviews, we have swayed away from discussing price too much since this epidemic of pricing.

    What you propose is interesting, but ultimately arbitrary and without meaning. We can’t just ‘make up’ a number to say it’s good or bad.

    MSRP is set by AMD and NVIDIA, and the metric which makes sense to compare with. One day, when pricing levels out to normal (if it does) and is back to MSRP, then these reviews today will still be relevant for people to make up their mind on what GPU fits them best. And when the 6600 XT is at MSRP, I will still say it’s a bad value and priced too high.

    And I guarantee you, AMD and NVIDIA are looking at the prices people are paying for video cards right now, and it’s got them thinking, they are thinking mmm, if they will pay that much, maybe we should raise the MSRP even higher next go-around.
    [/QUOTE]
    Or, they are looking at tech reviews sites which derive the card value based on an imaginary declared MSRP number and saying “mmm, we can win mind share by setting the price we will never actually sell at.”

  27. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39444, member: 3″]

    And I guarantee you, AMD and NVIDIA are looking at the prices people are paying for video cards right now, and it’s got them thinking, they are thinking mmm, if they will pay that much, maybe we should raise the MSRP even higher next go-around.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yes, but this is not something that is new is what I mean.

    There is no revelation here for Amd or Nvidia. If demand drops (people go back outside), or if supply increases (components become more available/cheaper), it does not make sense for AMD or NVidia to continue high prices. They will be losing profit.

    AMD and NVIDIA sell at whatever they think maximizes their profit.

    If AMD sells at a price that is too low that simply means they will run out of stock very quickly, all of the middlemen will buy them out, readjust the prices to what the market actually dictates, and AMD loses out on profit.

    If AMD sells at a price that is too high they simply wont sell as much, and AMD loses out on profit.

    People will pay what they think something is worth to them, regardless what someone else tells them to do. There is no single party that is to blame for anything here. If AMD readjusts the MSRP of 6600xt as the demand decreases or the supply increases, then that is ideal. MSRP should reflect what the price of the card actually with some amount of confidence. Right now it seems the MSRP is accurate (and maybe even still too low? not sure)

  28. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39444, member: 3″]
    In our reviews, we have swayed away from discussing price too much since this epidemic of pricing.
    [/QUOTE]
    I see. What about when giving awards to products, is MSRP used as part of the decision?

  29. [QUOTE=”serpretetsky, post: 39451, member: 4634″]
    I see. What about when giving awards to products, is MSRP used as part of the decision?
    [/QUOTE]

    MSRP will always play a part, as long as I’ve been reviewing computer hardware 20+ years, MSRP has always been a measuring stick

    It does have meaning and is the suggested price from AMD, NVIDIA et al

    It is not, however, the sole defining factor at all, it plays a part

  30. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39452, member: 3″]
    MSRP will always play a part, as long as I’ve been reviewing computer hardware 20+ years, MSRP has always been a measuring stick

    It does have meaning and is the suggested price from AMD, NVIDIA et al

    It is not, however, the sole defining factor at all, it plays a part
    [/QUOTE]
    I agree.

    In a “normal” economy, we saw that cards would often sell something less than MSRP, especially after they had been on the market for a bit, and was one way that AIBs could differentiate their SKUs, and that retailers could use to help drive sales depending on their willingness to cut into profit margins, their inventory levels, and the strength of their procurement contracts.

    MSRP was the level playing stick that the manufacturer expected a baseline SKU to go for, and while AIBs would tend to track a bit higher, were a way to normalize pricing to various levels of technology

  31. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39444, member: 3″]
    And I guarantee you, AMD and NVIDIA are looking at the prices people are paying for video cards right now, and it’s got them thinking, they are thinking mmm, if they will pay that much, maybe we should raise the MSRP even higher next go-around.
    [/QUOTE]

    My point exactly

  32. I find it a little bit odd that you complain about the price of a “budget” card, yet I don’t recall a similar editorial on the RTX 3090, Titan, RX6900…

  33. [QUOTE=”Stoly, post: 39481, member: 1474″]
    I find it a little bit odd that you complain about the price of a “budget” card, yet I don’t recall a similar editorial on the RTX 3090, Titan, RX6900…
    [/QUOTE]
    I’ve been complaining about price creep on cards for a long time now, especially the nVidia 2000 series.

  34. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 39482, member: 96″]
    I’ve been complaining about price creep on cards for a long time now, especially the nVidia 2000 series.
    [/QUOTE]
    I meant the article.

  35. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39452, member: 3″]
    MSRP will always play a part, as long as I’ve been reviewing computer hardware 20+ years, MSRP has always been a measuring stick

    It does have meaning and is the suggested price from AMD, NVIDIA et al

    It is not, however, the sole defining factor at all, it plays a part
    [/QUOTE]
    I see your points, and the difficulty that this places on you as a reviewer. But I do not see any simple solution here. Simply asking AMD to lower the MSRP may fix some things, but continues this trend of unrealistic “normal” MSRPs that have no correlation to actual price.

    I agree that in the long term, if/when prices start coming back down again, then having these current “normal” MSRPs that align with those future prices and having your review be based on those makes sense. But for the last year and for the current (hopefully short term?) situation most of these “normal” MSRPs are meaningless to consumers.

  36. [QUOTE=”serpretetsky, post: 39486, member: 4634″]
    I see your points, and the difficulty that this places on you as a reviewer. But I do not see any simple solution here. Simply asking AMD to lower the MSRP may fix some things, but continues this trend of unrealistic “normal” MSRPs that have no correlation to actual price.

    I agree that in the long term, if/when prices start coming back down again, then having these current “normal” MSRPs that align with those future prices and having your review be based on those makes sense. But for the last year and for the current (hopefully short term?) situation most of these “normal” MSRPs are meaningless to consumers.
    [/QUOTE]
    All the things you say here are correct and I agree with. The only thing AMD having set a lower MSRP for out of the gate would have done would be leading to positive brand recognition. It doesn’t make any more cards, it doesn’t affect the street price, it doesn’t affect what scalpers are going to sell for, and it only tangentially affects what AIBs are going to charge.

    My big point is that AMD missed a golden opportunity here, and Brent’s point is that AMD not only missed an opportunity but went a step further and just shot themselves in the foot.

    The MSRP may not affect anything on the street, but it still very much affects our perception of the product. And the message AMD just sent here is “Get out your wallet, this is about to get a lot more expensive”

  37. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 39487, member: 96″]
    The MSRP may not affect anything on the street, but it still very much affects our perception of the product. And the message AMD just sent here is “Get out your wallet, this is about to get a lot more expensive”
    [/QUOTE]
    Yes it seems that many people receive this message. Some, however do not. For me this seems more like a bit of honesty from AMD to the state of the market, while other card launches are trying to get good reviews based on an imaginary number.

    Another question: does MSRP reflect how much AMD charges for their chips to video card manufacturers?

  38. [QUOTE=”serpretetsky, post: 39492, member: 4634″]
    Yes it seems that many people receive this message. Some, however do not. For me this seems more like a bit of honesty from AMD to the state of the market, while other card launches are trying to get good reviews based on an imaginary number.

    Another question: does MSRP reflect how much AMD charges for their chips to video card manufacturers?
    [/QUOTE]
    Not really but I would assume there’s a correllation.

  39. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 39487, member: 96″]
    My big point is that AMD missed a golden opportunity here, and Brent’s point is that AMD not only missed an opportunity but went a step further and just shot themselves in the foot.

    The MSRP may not affect anything on the street, but it still very much affects our perception of the product. And the message AMD just sent here is “Get out your wallet, this is about to get a lot more expensive”
    [/QUOTE]
    I think you might have the completely wrong idea in actual effect? I believe the higher MSRP has been the best thing possible in the current environment. I just checked the local Microcenter again (online, don’t have time to driver over to check in person), and I still see 3 different models of 6600XT in stock, with at least 28 cards, and likely more, available.

    Had MSRP been lower and actual initial prices been lower such that release prices were, say, 249, all cards would be sold out. They wouldn’t have even made it to the end of the day release day, and would all be on ebay (of course they are some on ebay now at 599 buy it now). At the current price, it seems that they are not valuable to Miners, and scalpers don’t seem to think they can make any money on them. This means real, honest to god gamers, can walk in and buy a card if they want one.

    The legitimate on the shelf, walk in and buy one choices are now:
    $299 – 1050ti
    $399 – 6600XT
    $829 – 6700XT
    $1659 – 6800XT
    $1999 – 6900XT

    Nvidia 3000 cards might as well not exist – not available at any price in store. You can try your luck on the new egg shuffle (and probably get a “we’re sorry” email back for your entry for a 649 3060ti), or head over to ebay and “buy it now” a 3060 for $949.

    IMO, the editorial should have focused on

    1) stock – if it isn’t in stock in a store at all, anywhere, it fails recommendation. It might as well be a Bitchin Fast 3d 2000 if you can’t buy it anywhere.
    2) In case of situation 1, lowest “buy it now” ebay price is used for product actual price. This can be revised when product is available in a store
    3) When product is available in store, but not at MSRP, lowest actual in store price is used, such as AIB price.
    4) MSRP

  40. If they are still in stock at $399… it’s great they are available, but it means even the scalpers aren’t touching them…

  41. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 39509, member: 96″]
    If they are still in stock at $399… it’s great they are available, but it means even the scalpers aren’t touching them…
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s the benefit of the high MSRP, right? No room for the scalpers to make any money. If the scalpers don’t buy them out, there are cards available for gamers to buy. I don’t actually know the performance profile of a 1050ti off hand, but I’m going to guess $100 more for a 6600XT is a pretty good upgrade?

    edit to answer my own question.

    the 6600XT is an upgrade over the 5700XT per the review here. Per the Anandtech bench, the 5700xt is 2 to 4 times faster than the 1050ti.

    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.anandtech.com/bench/product/2522?vs=2573[/URL]

    The 6600XT should be 2.5 to 5x faster than the 1050ti.

    So, given a world where the baseline nib video card is a 1050ti for 299, the 6600XT is an amazing deal for 399.

  42. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39511, member: 1041″]
    the 6600XT is an upgrade over the 5700XT per the review here.
    [/QUOTE]

    I do not think so. It’s RX 5700 XT performance for roughly the same cost. The only advantage it has the capability to run Ray Tracing, and even then that varies greatly on the game, in some games it’s still useless unless you run low game settings.

    If you have a 5700 XT, keep it for now, the 6600 XT is not an upgrade from it.

  43. [QUOTE=”Brent_Justice, post: 39522, member: 3″]
    I do not think so. It’s RX 5700 XT performance for roughly the same cost. The only advantage it has the capability to run Ray Tracing, and even then that varies greatly on the game, in some games it’s still useless unless you run low game settings.

    If you have a 5700 XT, keep it for now, the 6600 XT is not an upgrade from it.
    [/QUOTE]
    Perhaps it’s better said that the 6600XT is faster than the 5700XT. In your review there is only 1 test where the 5700xt is faster. Generally the 6600XT is 5-10% faster.

    One of my buddies is looking to upgrade his Kid’s 670 to something newer. I offered to drive over to micro center and buy him something in stock. Given the options I listed above (1050ti at 299, 6600XT at 399 or 6700XT at 829), which card is the best value? I would love to get a 3060ti, but they are vapor, short of $900 ish eBay listings.

  44. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39524, member: 1041″]
    Perhaps it’s better said that the 6600XT is faster than the 5700XT. In your review there is only 1 test where the 5700xt is faster. Generally the 6600XT is 5-10% faster.

    One of my buddies is looking to upgrade his Kid’s 670 to something newer. I offered to drive over to micro center and buy him something in stock. Given the options I listed above (1050ti at 299, 6600XT at 399 or 6700XT at 829), which card is the best value? I would love to get a 3060ti, but they are vapor, short of $900 ish eBay listings.
    [/QUOTE]
    Well… I would say “best value of these options” doesn’t equate to “good value”.

    None of those are particularly appealing options. If that was all you had to chose from and you absolutely had to pick from one of those 3, I agree, the 6700 is the least bad of those options. But don’t mistake that for me thinking it’s a great option, or even a good one. The environment we are in and all, I do understand you often have to settle for what you can get. But that doesn’t mean I have to like it though. If the 670 still works ok, maybe it rides it out a bit further and see if some prices shake out a bit more.

    After all, if the 6700 didn’t instantly sell out to scalpers, maybe there is hope. Although I haven’t seen one in stock, and apparently MC is the only place that had them in.

  45. The 670 works fine. I told him his best bet is probably to wait it out – the discounted driver support isn’t a big deal to be honest. I’m on the EVGA wait list for all the cards, and I enter the shuffle for basically any non bundled 3080 / 3080tis – if one falls in my lap I’ll offer it to him and if he isn’t interested, I’ll probably upgrade the 1080ti in one of my boxes. I’ll give him the option buy the 1080ti at a reasonable price.

  46. Hardware Unboxed (@HardwareUnboxed) Tweeted:

    [QUOTE]AMD promised lots of RX 6600 XT graphics cards at the MSRP. Did that actually happen, what will pricing be in the future, and does that change our opinion on the GPU?[/QUOTE]

    [MEDIA=twitter]1427223649384288258[/MEDIA]

    [MEDIA=youtube]d5gOzLcaz_0[/MEDIA]

  47. So, what do they have to say? I’m not watching a YouTube video for what could have been written in 5 lines of text. I swear, someone could probably make a living just summing up all these crappy YouTube reviews.

    locally, microcenter sold out of 6600XTs yesterday. The question is, how long will it take them to restock?

  48. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39687, member: 1041″]
    So, what do they have to say? I’m not watching a YouTube video for what could have been written in 5 lines of text. I swear, someone could probably make a living just summing up all these crappy YouTube reviews.

    locally, microcenter sold out of 6600XTs yesterday. The question is, how long will it take them to restock?
    [/QUOTE]
    Basically WeLoveAMD Unboxed didnt love this one.

  49. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39687, member: 1041″]
    So, what do they have to say? I’m not watching a YouTube video for what could have been written in 5 lines of text. I swear, someone could probably make a living just summing up all these crappy YouTube reviews.

    locally, microcenter sold out of 6600XTs yesterday. The question is, how long will it take them to restock?
    [/QUOTE]

    TLDR:

    The 6600XTs were intially in stock at msrp

    But now they are 20% above.

    On one hand, They are still best deal available today but the base priced models are not coming back in stock. So going forward the 6600xt is likely to cost 20% above launch msrp

    On other hand, For a card marketed at 1080p this is poor value. 1080p card owners usually have a budget $200 to $300. So they should continue to wait out this launch & upgrade only if they are in desperate situation

  50. [QUOTE=”Marees, post: 39689, member: 1536″]
    TLDR:

    The 6600XTs were intially in stock at msrp

    But now they are 20% above.

    On one hand, They are still best deal available today but the base priced models are not coming back in stock. So going forward the 6600xt is likely to cost 20% above launch msrp

    On other hand, For a card marketed at 1080p this is poor value. 1080p card owners usually have a budget $200 to $300. So they should continue to wait out this launch & upgrade only if they are in desperate situation
    [/QUOTE]

    Link to the article version of the video

    [B][I]Where the 6600 XT ends up is basically being the least worst option, rather than a “best” value sort of product.[/I][/B]

    [URL]https://www.techspot.com/news/90801-pricing-availability-update-radeon-rx-6600-xt-how.html[/URL]

  51. From techspot:

    the RX 6600 XT needs to be priced at no more than $300 MSRP, ideally slightly lower, and then with the current ~20% price inflation, an actual [URL=’https://www.amazon.com/s?k=RX+6600+XT&ref=nb_sb_noss&tag=httpwwwtechsp-20′]retail price of $360[/URL] would be easier to digest.

    That’s not how market price correction works. You can set the MSRP to $1. The cards will still be selling for $500 …

    The sentiment is that these “MSRP” cards were effectively a promotional price for launch day.

    A promotional price that needs to be even lower. Got it. /s

  52. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39687, member: 1041″]
    So, what do they have to say? I’m not watching a YouTube video for what could have been written in 5 lines of text. I swear, someone could probably make a living just summing up all these crappy YouTube reviews.

    locally, microcenter sold out of 6600XTs yesterday. The question is, how long will it take them to restock?
    [/QUOTE]
    Well, no restock of 6600XTs, but microcenter did get a batch of Asus 1050tis in for 189. Not sure if the $100 price drop from the last batch of 1050tis is coincidence, or if it’s related to the 6600XT launch, but at least that is heading the right direction.

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