Image: ASUS

Enthusiasts who plan to upgrade to Intel’s upcoming 12th Gen Core “Alder Lake-S” processors and pair them with an expensive premium motherboard may have no choice but to also complement them with the next generation of DDR memory.

Filings for ASUS’ upcoming Z690 motherboards have been spotted over at the Eurasian Economic Commission regulatory office, and many of the products include designations for whether they support DDR4 memory or not. The implication is that the motherboards that don’t include this “D4” designation, such as the ROG MAXIMUS Z690 EXTREME, will only include support for DDR5 memory.

Name of product: Computer motherboards, “ASUS” trademark, models: PRIME B365-C / SI, PRIME H410M-K R2.0, PRIME H510TS, PRIME Z690-A, PRIME Z690-A D4, PRIME Z690M-PLUS D4, PRIME Z690 -P, PRIME Z690-P D4, PRIME Z690-V, PRIME Z690-V D4, PRIME Z690-V-SI-D4, ProART Z690-CREATOR 10G, ROG CROSSHAIR VIII EXTREME, ROG MAXIMUS Z690 EXTREME, ROG MAXIMUS Z690 FOR ROG MAXIMUS Z690 HERO, ROG STRIX Z690-A GAMING D4, ROG STRIX Z690-E GAMING D4, ROG STRIX Z690-F GAMING D4, TUF GAMING Z690-PLUS D4.

Full name of goods: Computer motherboards, “ASUS” trademark, models: PRIME B365-C / SI, PRIME H410M-K R2.0, PRIME H510TS, PRIME Z690-A, PRIME Z690-A D4, PRIME Z690M-PLUS D4, PRIME Z690 -P, PRIME Z690-P D4, PRIME Z690-V, PRIME Z690-V D4, PRIME Z690-V-SI-D4, ProART Z690-CREATOR 10G, ROG CROSSHAIR VIII EXTREME, ROG MAXIMUS Z690 EXTREME, ROG MAXIMUS Z690 FOR ROG MAXIMUS Z690 HERO, ROG STRIX Z690-A GAMING D4, ROG STRIX Z690-E GAMING D4, ROG STRIX Z690-F GAMING D4, TUF GAMING Z690-PLUS D4.

The listings here obviously only relate to ASUS, but they do open up the possibility of other major manufacturers following in its footsteps with premium Z690 motherboards that only support DDR5 memory. Intel will reportedly launch this chipset in November.

Source: EEC (via KOMACHI_ENSAKA)

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7 Comments

  1. Why is this a surprise to anyone? I thought everyone understood the new chips would use DDR5? I thought they would also have access to PCIE 5.x Is that not the case?

    (Reading article now.)

    Ok PCiE wasn’t mentioned.

    But still. why would you want DDR4 with these CPU’s? You WANT less performance with your new chipset and CPU?

  2. Why is this a surprise to anyone? I thought everyone understood the new chips would use DDR5?

    Agreed.

    It is the exception rather than the rule for a CPU’s memory controller to support more than one type of RAM. With a few notable exceptions, you usually only have the one choice.

  3. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. It’s rare for a memory controller to support more than one type of RAM. That said, even in the old days with proper chipsets, it was a rare. Normally, a motherboard would support one technology or the other with a few boards (usually cheap ones) supporting both. The high end boards almost always exclusively supported the newer memory technology.
  4. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. It’s rare for a memory controller to support more than one type of RAM. That said, even in the old days with proper chipsets, it was a rare. Normally, a motherboard would support one technology or the other with a few boards (usually cheap ones) supporting both. The high end boards almost always exclusively supported the newer memory technology.

    I vaguely remember only a handful of platforms that have supported both.

    There were some AM2 AMD platforms and matching CPU’s that had both DDR2 and DDR3 support, if memory serves, but my memory is hazy there. Then if you go back to the Pentium IV era, there was the initial lock-in to RAMBUS, and later availablitiy of DDR boards, but that was before the memory controller migrated to the CPU package, so it had nothing to do with the CPU, and was a motherboard chipset either or thing. I don’t recall there being any boards that supported both RAMBUS and DDR.

    More recently there were a bunch of Intel CPU’s that supported bother DDR4 and DDR3L, but I don’t recall anyone actually running DDR3L in them.

    The benefit of somethign like this is to ease the cost of upgrading. Buy the Motherboard and CPU first, continue to use existing RAM, and upgrade it at a later time. In the case of DDR4/DDR3L that was kind of a waste, because who on earth had DDR3L on hand they wanted to continue using?

  5. More recently there were a bunch of Intel CPU’s that supported bother DDR4 and DDR3L, but I don’t recall anyone actually running DDR3L in them.

    Laptops. Primarily before DDR4L was widely available, and mostly on ultrabook-class laptops for power usage reasons, IIRC.

    I believe we’ve seen the capability in the memory controllers over most memory technology transitions, but as discussed so far, implementations of both on the same board are pretty rare.

  6. Here is a thought. We all know memory makers want more margin on their products. Well now is the perfect time for a little "planned" scarcity to jack up prices. I expect we will see 500 buck 32 gig kits here soon.
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