Image: Lucasfilm

Marcia Lucas, the Oscar-winning editor of Star Wars: Episiode IV – A New Hope (and George Lucas’ ex-wife), doesn’t seem to be a fan of how Disney’s sequel trilogy turned out.

In an interview for Howard Kazanjian: A Producer’s Life, a new book regarding the life and work of the legendary film producer behind classics such as The Empire Strikes Back, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and Return of the Jedi, Lucas expressed her contempt for the new Star Wars movies, accusing Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy and director J.J. Abrams of having no clue how to handle the franchise.

Lucas revealed how furious she was when she learned about Han Solo’s death in The Force Awakens, which was similarly and unfortunately proceeded by the death of other key characters such as Luke Skywalker and Princess Leia. Lucas also criticized the sequel trilogy’s protagonist, Rey, in that nobody seems to know how she got her powers or what her actual backstory is.

The full excerpt from Lucas:

“I like Kathleen. I always liked her,” says Marcia Lucas. “She was full of beans. She was really smart and really bright. Really wonderful woman. And I liked her husband, Frank. I liked them a lot. Now that she’s running Lucasfilm and making movies, it seems to me that Kathy Kennedy and J.J. Abrams don’t have a clue about Star Wars. They don’t get it. And J.J. Abrams is writing these stories when I saw that movie where they kill Han Solo, I was furious. I was furious when they killed Han Solo. Absolutely, positively there was no rhyme or reason to it. I thought, You don’t get the Jedi story. You don’t get the magic of Star Wars. You’re getting rid of Han Solo? And then at the end of this last one, The Last Jedi, they have Luke disintegrate. They killed Han Solo. They killed Luke Skywalker. And they don’t have Princess Leia anymore. And they’re spitting out movies every year. And they think it’s important to appeal to a woman’s audience, so now their main character is this female, who’s supposed to have Jedi powers, but we don’t know how she got Jedi powers, or who she is. It sucks. The storylines are terrible. Just terrible. Awful.

“You can quote me ‘J.J. Abrams, Kathy Kennedy—talk to me.'”

Lucas won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing in 1977 for her work on Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope, but she also played a substantial role in the development of some of the film’s most memorable story beats. She was the one who told George Lucas to consider letting Obi-Wan Kenobi die at the hands of Darth Vader during their iconic lightsaber battle in the Death Star.

Source: Jedi scum (via Variety)

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27 Comments

  1. This isn’t surprising at all. Disney went into the sequel trilogy with absolutely no cohesive plan and it was obviously in the hands of the wrong people.

  2. Well given that the original trilogy already had more plot holes then swiss cheese and let’s not talk about the prequels, the last ones are par for the course if you ask me.

    They might not have the same feeling the original trilogy had, they were far ahead of the prequels, now if only they had cast someone other then Adam Driver.

  3. [QUOTE=”Denpepe, post: 41581, member: 284″]
    Well given that the original trilogy already had more plot holes then swiss cheese and let’s not talk about the prequels, the last ones are par for the course if you ask me.

    They might not have the same feeling the original trilogy had, they were far ahead of the prequels, now if only they had cast someone other then Adam Driver.
    [/QUOTE]
    I’m going to disagree. The sequel trilogy is far worse in terms of writing. Legacy characters are mischaracterized, written inconsistently with established history with insufficient narrative justification. The hero’s journey is discarded in favor of a protagonist that never fails, never grows, and never changes. She’s a Mary Sue who is literally the best at everything on her first try. It’s fan-fiction level writing. There is no coherent plan to the series with plot threads dropped in the second movie.

    In fact, that movie even goes so far as to stop plot threads in their tracks with no payoff. It’s main villain is killed off like a generic henchman and scenes like the space chase are beyond nonsensical. Even by Star Wars standards. Basic physics are ignored and the entire sequence is the most contrived thing I’ve ever seen.

    The ships not being able to catch each other is well and good, however, TIE fighters can easily catch the ship and do. Somehow, three of them have enough firepower to seriously damage the ship. So a ship that’s big enough to make up a significant part of the Death Star’s mass doesn’t have more they could launch? They are firing blasters at the fleeing resistance ship, but can’t destroy it?

    They cite being at the edge of weapons range reduces their effectiveness, but there is nothing to indicate refraction of the beams or any medium to reduce their power output. Range in space has nothing to do with depleting over distance, but rather being avoidable when far enough away to just get out of the way of something traveling in a straight line. You would also need to be hundreds of thousands of kilometers away from the target for this situation to occur. In other words travel time for a laser is around 1 second at 300,000km. A ship would need several seconds to detect the beam and move out of the way. But that distance doesn’t dilute the beams destructive capability. Certainly not at those distances without being inside a nebula or something.

    And are we supposed to believe that a ship that’s the size of several Star Destroyers and far larger than Executor lacks the firepower to destroy a ship that couldn’t take on a single Star Destroyer of the new era? This seems like BS when a single TIE has lasers powerful enough to destroy the bridge and space everyone. Let’s not forget that Leia can Mary Poppins her way back into a ship that would have passed by her after she was blown out. Yet, she just flies through the hole like it’s no big deal. She’d have died in mere seconds. In the film she kind of seems to wake up and then will herself through the hole in the ship that shouldn’t be there.

    And of course, the problem isn’t that the shields will run out of energy while being bombarded. The issue is that the ship will run out of fuel. There is no reason for this to be true given that there isn’t anything to slow the ship down once the engines are fired. They’d only need a burst to get the ship moving at speed. They act as though the lightspeed drive won’t work, despite the fact that these aren’t all the same. It’s doubtful that a ship the size of that wing thing would be as fast as the smaller vessel. Tracking it wouldn’t matter if it could stay ahead of it. Hyperdrive fuel wasn’t a stated problem.

    But the ship slowing down when it runs out of fuel makes no sense. The escort frigate that did this also began spinning end over end for no reason. Let’s not forget that the main characters can just board a ship during this pursuit, fly to another star system and back without issue either. Star Wars has never been as dumb as the Last Jedi. Period. The quality of the sequel trilogy, despite being visually excellent is the lowest it’s ever been. The above scene analysis is just one of dozens or more problems those movies have that no other Star Wars films have.

  4. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 41583, member: 6″]
    A ship would need several seconds to detect the beam and move out of the way.
    [/QUOTE]
    Just curious, since we are talking about physics inaccuracies, but how you would detect a laser fire in time to move out of the way?

  5. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 41584, member: 96″]
    Just curious, since we are talking about physics inaccuracies, but how you would detect a laser fire in time to move out of the way?
    [/QUOTE]
    You would have to be at a considerable distance from the firing ship to detect it. You’d probably have to be a couple million kilometers away from the ship to have that kind of time. Normally in science fiction, ships can detect another ship powering up their weapons systems, but Star Wars generally doesn’t usually delve too much into those sorts of things.

  6. They should have put the marvel team in charge of Star Wars. They know how to dig through mountains of source material and cook up something good. There were plenty of Star Wars novels set after Return of the Jedi that could have had core ideas used to create the framework of the new movies. Heck, straight out copying Timothy Zhan’s Thrawn Trilogy would have been better that what we got, but with a little effort they could have gone an extra mile and used that as a framework and made it better.

  7. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 41586, member: 6″]
    You would have to be at a considerable distance from the firing ship to detect it. You’d probably have to be a couple million kilometers away from the ship to have that kind of time. Normally in science fiction, ships can detect another ship powering up their weapons systems, but Star Wars generally doesn’t usually delve too much into those sorts of things.
    [/QUOTE]
    Wouldn’t that rely on detecting something faster than the speed of light?

  8. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 41588, member: 96″]
    Wouldn’t that rely on detecting something faster than the speed of light?
    [/QUOTE]

    everything else pointed out and you ‘laser’ focus on detecting something with something faster than the speed of light because you’re detecting the path and trajectory of light. I get it… it was a bad example. Maybe the big ship weapons are plasma beams so inherently not as good.

    Also a laser WOULD loose energy over space. It’s called thermographic radiation. The fact that it is observable means that energy is not traversing a straight line. It is dissipating energy along it’s path. But yes a ship at a few hundred thousand kilometers on a laser packed with that much energy would just get hit. Period. Maybe at that distance the surface can optimize for automated refraction… or something to help tone down the effectiveness of the blast.

    They screwed it up good I’ll agree but to a lot of that for myself at least I just eye roll and willfully engage the suspension of disbelief because it’s star wars.

  9. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 41588, member: 96″]
    Wouldn’t that rely on detecting something faster than the speed of light?
    [/QUOTE]
    Yes, but light takes time to travel. Roughly 300,000km per second. If you are far enough away, it might be possible. My whole point was that at the distances involved, the blaster bolts likely wouldn’t lose power just because they are at range. The ships don’t seem that far apart in the scene. The ships are also traveling the exact same course. The ships are close enough that the TIE fighters can reach them in almost no time flat without hyperspace flight. Even if the ships main weapons couldn’t hit the resistance ship, the TIE fighters could catch it and destroy it easily. The had a ship with presumably hundreds of fighters and only launched three.

    The more you examine the scene, the worse it gets.
    [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 41589, member: 215″]
    everything else pointed out and you ‘laser’ focus on detecting something with something faster than the speed of light because you’re detecting the path and trajectory of light. I get it… it was a bad example. Maybe the big ship weapons are plasma beams so inherently not as good.

    Also a laser WOULD loose energy over space. It’s called thermographic radiation. The fact that it is observable means that energy is not traversing a straight line. It is dissipating energy along it’s path. But yes a ship at a few hundred thousand kilometers on a laser packed with that much energy would just get hit. Period. Maybe at that distance the surface can optimize for automated refraction… or something to help tone down the effectiveness of the blast.

    They screwed it up good I’ll agree but to a lot of that for myself at least I just eye roll and willfully engage the suspension of disbelief because it’s star wars.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yes, its Star Wars. But even Star Wars has been mostly consistent with such things up until the sequel trilogy. Even science fiction requires rules for the universe in order to allow for suspension of disbelief. By even Star Wars standards, The Last Jedi is stupid as hell. That’s my point. The quality of writing has never been worse than it is in the sequel trilogy. The Force seems to have no limits whatsoever. Allowing communication and even teleporting of objects across vast interstellar distances.

    The Force in these films now negates the need for training, allows stopping of blaster bolts (that should be traveling near lightspeed) for a time. So now, someone like Luke wouldn’t even get overwhelmed by too many troopers shooting at them. Not when they can damn stop the blaster bolts with a thought. Someone dies? Bring them back with the Force. Someone lose their keys? Teleport them with the Force. The Force is literally used to do whatever is required by the plot.

    It’s not consistent with previous stories and what’s worse, it’s a giant McGuffin lazy writers used to drive a very contrived plot. A story that relies on so much contrivance or coincidence isn’t a good one.

    You also have the lightspeed ramming scene, which itself creates a lot of additional problems. They could have just flown a cruiser into the death star and destroyed its planet killing laser. X-Wings could be flown into Star Destroyers at hyperspace velocities, blasters wouldn’t make sense over lightspeed drive equipped missiles.

    I can go on and on.

  10. Yea… and the whole light speed ‘skipping’ into an atmosphere… should have = crushed ship. the forces alone from hitting at atmosphere at near or exceeding light speed are astronomical. (heh)

  11. Yet noone has a problem that Jedi are able to deflect laser/blaster bolts with a lightsaber.

    I also would like to see the science explained how Luke and Han survive that night in the freezing cold on hoth. And why would the empire launch a ground assault there, they can just nuke everything from orbit.

    All of the movies are only believable if you want to believe them.

    Then again I have never watched a movie like this for it’s great story but for their entertainement value

  12. [QUOTE=”Denpepe, post: 41598, member: 284″]
    Yet noone has a problem that Jedi are able to deflect laser/blaster bolts with a lightsaber.

    I also would like to see the science explained how Luke and Han survive that night in the freezing cold on hoth. And why would the empire launch a ground assault there, they can just nuke everything from orbit.

    All of the movies are only believable if you want to believe them.

    Then again I have never watched a movie like this for it’s great story but for their entertainement value
    [/QUOTE]
    If you have to go to the physics of the movie to defend it you have already lost. The difference is that the original triology is good enough that nobody cares about it breaking our understanding of physics and laser beams. Physics doesn’t even allow lightsabers to exist. It establishes its own rules and then sticks by them. And the rules are not self serving or changed midway for a convenient plot point.

    If you don’t care about a movie having a coherent story, I can understand you liking it, but for me for a movie to be entertaining it has to have a good story too, not just flashes and bangs.

  13. All I know is that it almost feels like some kind of punishment to re-watch that trilogy. I’m not saying there are not moments that I like but overall it is just the overall feeling that brings me down. I can’t even make it through the 2nd one anymore and bizarrely enough my favorite part of that is the casino planet and that’s only because I find it refreshing to see another part of the universe and not the various agendas and I thought the scenes with Benecio were fun. I have to agree with Marica though. I once also read an article years ago stating how unrealistic it was that those first 2 movies technically only span something like 48 hours which also seemed like some pretty weird pacing for the story. The title of the article was something like “The most dramatic two days in the SW universe”.

  14. [QUOTE=”Denpepe, post: 41598, member: 284″]
    Yet noone has a problem that Jedi are able to deflect laser/blaster bolts with a lightsaber.

    I also would like to see the science explained how Luke and Han survive that night in the freezing cold on hoth. And why would the empire launch a ground assault there, they can just nuke everything from orbit.

    All of the movies are only believable if you want to believe them.

    Then again I have never watched a movie like this for it’s great story but for their entertainement value
    [/QUOTE]
    Well, primarily for two reasons. 1.) The Force is basically space magic. But even the Force has limitations and the first six films are mostly consistent with the basic ground rules established by the earliest installments of those films. Namely, episodes IV and V. 2.) It’s stated pretty clearly in Episode I that Jedi doing things like blocking blaster bolts with a lightsaber is a pre-emptive action. They aren’t actually reacting to something after the fact, but are instead responding just slightly ahead of the event. It’s essentially a reaction based on precognition.

    This is also why Jedi sometimes react to stuff they cannot have seen in a traditional way. Such as Yoda taking out the two clone troopers who try to kill him in Episode III. He had absolutely no way to know they would do that without the Force.

    Also, it’s made clear in The Empire Strikes back that the energy shield protecting the base on Hoth is strong enough to withstand bombardment from the Imperial Fleet. They send in ground troops because presumably, this field does not stop an approach from the ground which is evidenced in the film. It’s a quick piece of dialog which establishes all this, but its in the movie.

  15. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 41604, member: 6″]
    Well, primarily for two reasons. 1.) The Force is basically space magic. But even the Force has limitations and the first six films are mostly consistent with the basic ground rules established by the earliest installments of those films. Namely, episodes IV and V. 2.) It’s stated pretty clearly in Episode I that Jedi doing things like blocking blaster bolts with a lightsaber is a pre-emptive action. They aren’t actually reacting to something after the fact, but are instead responding just slightly ahead of the event. It’s essentially a reaction based on precognition.

    [/QUOTE]
    We also see in Ep 2 that deflecting blaster bolts isn’t guaranteed – sometimes Jedi miss.

  16. I love when star wars discussions get technical/s Star wars is bad sci fi, perhaps the worst sci fi. However the original have a lot of everything else going for it. .. this last trilogy have nothing going for it but polished visuals and sound. Everything else is plain garbage, expensive looking and sounding garbage, but garbage.

  17. [QUOTE=”Uvilla, post: 41614, member: 397″]
    I love when star wars discussions get technical/s Star wars is bad sci fi, perhaps the worst sci fi. However the original have a lot of everything else going for it. .. this last trilogy have nothing going for it but polished visuals and sound. Everything else is plain garbage, expensive looking and sounding garbage, but garbage.
    [/QUOTE]
    Space Odyssey is a scifi, star trek the motion picture is a scifi. Star wars was always action adventure first

  18. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 41616, member: 1298″]
    Space Odyssey is a scifi, star trek the motion picture is a scifi. Star wars was always action adventure first
    [/QUOTE]
    Maybe since it was a Long Time Ago, it’s actually a historical documentary?

  19. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 41616, member: 1298″]
    Space Odyssey is a scifi, star trek the motion picture is a scifi. Star wars was always action adventure first
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep, sci fi aesthetic? Sounds about right.

  20. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 41608, member: 1041″]
    We also see in Ep 2 that deflecting blaster bolts isn’t guaranteed – sometimes Jedi miss.
    [/QUOTE]
    They can get overwhelmed by excessive volume of fire too. They aren’t infallible which is part of the reason why the sequel trilogy is so hard to watch. Even in Return of the Jedi, Luke fails to deflect a blaster bolt which hits him in his cybernetic hand. Rey, makes no mistakes. The one time she thought she did, it turned out that she was mistaken.

    That’s literally what passes for writing in the sequel trilogy.
    [QUOTE=”Uvilla, post: 41614, member: 397″]
    I love when star wars discussions get technical/s Star wars is bad sci fi, perhaps the worst sci fi. However the original have a lot of everything else going for it. .. this last trilogy have nothing going for it but polished visuals and sound. Everything else is plain garbage, expensive looking and sounding garbage, but garbage.
    [/QUOTE]
    Oh, there is worse. Try watching series 11 and 12 of Doctor Who. The sequel trilogy is almost a masterpiece comparatively. Star Wars has always played it loose with the physics and science in general. The stories never covered how things worked, just that they did. It was about spectacle and grandeur. However, Star Wars was at least internally consistent. It did have a set of rules that were followed to make sure the films had consistent portrayal of technology. This was even true for the prequel era. While everything was different stylistically, it was at least basically the same as what came after.

    The Force Awakens hasn’t been panned as hard by fans as the subsequent movies, despite being more idiotic than people noticed. Even it’s badly written. Here is an example of what I mean:

    The sequel trilogy now has a Death Star the size of a planet that somehow fires a huge beam by draining a star to do it. The problem is, when you siphon off a star’s mass like that, it’s going to either expand into a red giant phase and destroy your planet sized death star, or the fucking thing will supernova and destroy your death star planet thing. Then the beam somehow travels faster than light and then splits up to hit like five planets at once.

    For some reason, the entire New Republic government is based in a system with three to five inhabitable planets that all get hit at once. That was sure convenient for the First Order. Why would a galactic civilization put all their government and military leaders in a single star system? How does this system have five inhabitable planets in it? What are the odds of that? Was it terraformed that way? It was sure lucky that the beam had a straight shot to hit all of them at the right time without the system’s star or some other celestial object being in the way or something.

    How did they make a beam that travels faster than light and split apart just in time to hit all its targets? Remember, the beam fired from the unknown regions or unexplored region of the galaxy all the way to the Galactic Core worlds. It’s also worth noting that the Star Wars Galaxy is roughly twice the size of our own at nearly 200,000 light years across.
    [ATTACH type=”full” alt=”1632257271624.png”]1246[/ATTACH]

    Star Wars may have always been bad on the science part of science fiction but again, at least it was consistent and the rules were easily understood. The main draw to Star Wars beyond its visual style was its story and character work. Yeah, the dialog is cheesy in places but the character work is fantastic. Luke’s hero’s journey is both entertaining and compelling. It’s formulaic, but there is a reason why its survived in literature, film and TV for this long. It fucking works.

    The sequel trilogy, doesn’t have a good story. It has no character arcs. No character development. It has plots that are driven by contrivances and sheer coincidences. The Force is used as a simple McGuffin to do whatever the writers need it to. It’s all flash with absolutely no substance. There’s a place for that sort of thing, I won’t deny that. Look at a lot of your big budget MCU flicks. They are about as deep as a kiddie pool with a hole in it.

    That being said, they entertain a lot of people. The sequel trilogy doesn’t do that for many because it’s badly written, breaks Star Wars canon, mistreats beloved legacy characters and even insults the intelligence of the audience. People are often stupid creatures but even American audiences are sophisticated enough to know that its a pile of shit.

  21. Dan, you [I]really[/I] hit the f*cking nail on the head with all you have stated thus far. Your posts will help me more easily explain this whole Ep7-9 train wreck to a bunch of people.

  22. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 41619, member: 6″]
    The stories never covered how things worked,
    [/QUOTE]
    Midichlorians.

  23. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 41621, member: 96″]
    Midichlorians.
    [/QUOTE]
    And I thought that was the worst thing Star Wars could do…..then 7, 8, and 9 came out. Now, I miss Jar-Jar and the Midichlorians BS.

  24. [QUOTE=”Paul_Johnson, post: 41622, member: 2″]
    And I thought that was the worst thing Star Wars could do…..then 7, 8, and 9 came out. Now, I miss Jar-Jar and the Midichlorians BS.
    [/QUOTE]
    I agree. I had rewatched them right around the time when Disney+ came out just so I could see them in 4k and I had no intention of buying them again. At first, I was like, these have not aged well, except for my favorite scene with Obi and Jango in the asteroid belt. I recently rewatched them again about 2 months ago and they actually seemed uplifting after surviving this mess. I was able to stomach all the kid stuff George shoveled out and enjoy it. One of these days I still want to make a custom edit of Ep2 with some of the deleted scenes restored. There are a few good ones. I’d also like to do the same for Phantom menace with the even more extended pod race that’s on the bonus DVD(still got it even though I hated the movie). At the time I didn’t like the pod race either but in my later years its growing on me.

  25. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 41621, member: 96″]
    Midichlorians.
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t recall them saying too much about it other than the midichlorian count having to do with anything beyond measuring potential power levels. That said, I always thought of this as the biological difference between those who could use the Force and those who couldn’t. That is, it is the biological mechanism that allows some people to use the force. It also explains how the ability to use it is hereditary.

    I didn’t like this mechanism either and wish they had never done it. I never said the movies were without fault and that’s why I stated they were “mostly consistent” rather than “100% consistent.”

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