Image: GIGABYTE

The EEC has leaked what appears to be GIGABYTE’s entire opening volley of Z690 motherboards for Intel’s upcoming 12th Gen Core “Alder Lake-S” processors. They include premium flagship AORUS models such as the Z690 AORUS EXTREME and AORUS MASTER, as well as more mainstream options such as the Z690 UD (Ultra Durable) and Z690 AERO G. The motherboards are expected to launch in November 2021 alongside Intel’s latest desktop CPUs.

The complete list of GIGABYTE’s Z690 motherboards:

  • Z690 AORUS XTREME WB
  • Z690 AORUS XTREME
  • Z690 AORUS MASTER
  • Z690 AORUS TACHYON
  • Z690 AORUS ELITE
  • Z690 AORUS ELITE STEALTH
  • Z690 AORUS PRO
  • Z690 AORUS ULTRA
  • Z690 AORUS ELITE AX
  • Z690I AORUS ULTRA
  • Z690 AERO G
  • Z690 AERO D
  • Z690 GAMING X
  • Z690 UD
  • Z690M DS3H
  • Z690 UD AX
  • Z690 UD AC
  • Z690 AORUS ELITE DDR4
  • Z690M A ELITE DDR4
  • Z690 AORUS PRO DDR4
  • Z690 A ELITE AX DDR4
  • Z690M A ELITE AX DDR4
  • Z690I A ULTRA DDR4
  • Z690 AERO G DDR4
  • Z690 GAMING X DDR4
  • Z690 UD DDR4
  • Z690 UD AX DDR4

The list seems to contribute to the theory that only select motherboards will be blessed with support for the latest and greatest memory, DDR5. At least ten of the motherboards appear to be relegated to DDR4 only, as indicated by the naming schemes.

Source: EEC (1, 2) (via momomo_us)

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3 Comments

  1. It makes sense… I mean why wouldn’t you have 24 different motherboard models to go with 48 bazillion CPU models?

  2. 25 models seems a little excessive.

    If I were in the market for an Alder Lake-S chip, and one of these motherboards was a version with excellent powere delivery and overclocking features, with no on board devices except for what is included in the chipset, as many PCIe slots as possible, and only basic black or green boards without fancy looking heatsinks or LED/RGB lighting, I’d buy it.

    But sadly, I doubt that despite the existence of 25 freaking SKU’s, none of them are going to be what I want.

  3. It doesn’t take much to crank up a lot of different models that are nearly identical – take a mid-tier offering: one has wifi, one has RGB, one has Thunderbolt, one has WiFi ~and~ RGB, one has WiFi and Thunderbolt, one has Thunderbolt and RGB, one has WiFi and Thunderbolt and RGB, and then doesn’t have any of those.

    That’s what, like 8 different SKUs for one pricing tier. Throw in about 3 tiers, and your easily up over 20 models.

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