Image: AMD

Dr. Lisa Su’s impressive resume just got even better. As announced by POTUS today, AMD’s president and CEO is now an official member of the Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), a group that comprises the nation’s top scientists and technologists. Su will join other PCAST members in assisting the President and White House with crucial policy recommendations related to science, technology, and innovation.

It’s no surprise that Su was chosen. As noted in her official bio on the White House site, Su is an expert engineer who contributed nicely to the semiconductor industry by presenting new ways to greatly speed up chips. Su is also a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and an IEEE Fellow.

From the White House:

Today, President Biden announced 30 of America’s most distinguished leaders in science and technology as members of his President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). A direct descendant of the scientific advisory committee established by President Eisenhower in 1957 in the weeks after the launch of Sputnik, PCAST is the sole body of external advisors charged with making science, technology, and innovation policy recommendations to the President and the White House.

Drawing from the nation’s most talented and accomplished individuals, President Biden’s PCAST includes 20 elected members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, five MacArthur “Genius” Fellows, two former Cabinet secretaries, and two Nobel laureates. Its members include experts in astrophysics and agriculture, biochemistry and computer engineering, ecology and entrepreneurship, immunology and nanotechnology, neuroscience and national security, social science and cybersecurity, and more.

Dr. Lisa Su’s official bio on the White House site:

Lisa T. Su, Ph.D., is an electrical engineer who is an expert in semiconductor devices and high-performance processors. She pioneered new ways to connect computer chips using copper instead of aluminum, resulting in 20% faster chip speeds. An American immigrant from Taiwan, she is President and CEO of Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), a leading semiconductor and microprocessor company. She is a recipient of the IEEE Robert N. Noyce Medal (the first woman to receive the award), and has been named Fortune Magazine’s #2 “Business Person of the Year” for 2020 and one of Barron’s “World’s Best CEOs” of 2019.

Source: White House

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8 Comments

  1. I was under the impression that ceos are more knowledgable in the business side of things than the actual technical details. A technical advisor should probably be the chief engineer of AMD, not the business leader.

  2. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 41728, member: 1298″]
    I was under the impression that ceos are more knowledgable in the business side of things than the actual technical details. A technical advisor should probably be the chief engineer of AMD, not the business leader.
    [/QUOTE]
    I think GM and other US manufacturers would disagree. Once they re established leadership that was engineering focused the quality of the vehicles and the ‘life’ of the vehicles they produced took a sharp change for the positive.

    I would venture to say that you need engineering leaders in leadership positions. Because marketing leadership doesn’t know shit about engineering. This go’s on to further explain why and how AMD has turned the ship around so well under her direction.

  3. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 41728, member: 1298″]
    I was under the impression that ceos are more knowledgable in the business side of things than the actual technical details. A technical advisor should probably be the chief engineer of AMD, not the business leader.
    [/QUOTE]
    She has a BS, MS, and PhD in electrical engineering from MIT. I think she likely understands the technical details just fine.

  4. I think it takes all kinds. You can’t just be narrowly focused and make it as a publicly traded company.

    You can have a CEO that is from a financial background lead a technical company just fine – so long as they have a strong CTO and others to back them up. Vice versa – you can have a strong technical person lead a financial firm just fine, so long as they have a strong CFO and others to back them up.

    It takes all kinds of mixed talents to keep the boat going in the right direction. What the person has at the helm isn’t so important as the team they build around them – and that “leadership” quality is fairly cross-disciplinary and hard to teach.

  5. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 41752, member: 96″]
    I think it takes all kinds. You can’t just be narrowly focused and make it as a publicly traded company.

    You can have a CEO that is from a financial background lead a technical company just fine – so long as they have a strong CTO and others to back them up. Vice versa – you can have a strong technical person lead a financial firm just fine, so long as they have a strong CFO and others to back them up.

    It takes all kinds of mixed talents to keep the boat going in the right direction. What the person has at the helm isn’t so important as the team they build around them – and that “leadership” quality is fairly cross-disciplinary and hard to teach.
    [/QUOTE]
    That was my point. That you don’t need a leader as a technical advisor. I know leaders who have half a dozen technical degrees, and they are still useless as engineers. I don’t know her background and if she ever worked in the trenches as an actual technical engineer, or was always more on the leadership side. I’d wager this is more of a nod, or recognition than an actual role where she will actively work to advise.

  6. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 41765, member: 1298″]
    That was my point. That you don’t need a leader as a technical advisor. I know leaders who have half a dozen technical degrees, and they are still useless as engineers. I don’t know her background and if she ever worked in the trenches as an actual technical engineer, or was always more on the leadership side. I’d wager this is more of a nod, or recognition than an actual role where she will actively work to advise.
    [/QUOTE]
    Here you go:
    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.amd.com/system/files/documents/lisa-su-letter.pdf[/URL]

  7. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 41765, member: 1298″]
    That was my point. That you don’t need a leader as a technical advisor. I know leaders who have half a dozen technical degrees, and they are still useless as engineers. I don’t know her background and if she ever worked in the trenches as an actual technical engineer, or was always more on the leadership side. I’d wager this is more of a nod, or recognition than an actual role where she will actively work to advise.
    [/QUOTE]
    Maybe it’s because I like what she has accomplished or some tiny bit of fanboy nonsense but I honestly believe that you are just wrong here. But to each their own.

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