Image: Intel

CRN has shared a new interview with Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger, and it’s an essential read for Intel fanboys who require reassurance that their company will return to the top of the CPU market after being blindsided by AMD.

Despite the tremendous success that its competitor has managed in recent years with its brilliant family of Ryzen chips, Gelsinger is hugely confident about Intel being able to take back the processing crown from AMD, going so far as to say that red team’s lead is already “over.” Much of that confidence seems to be owed to Intel’s upcoming Alder Lake and Sapphire Rapids products, which leverage substantially different architectures for what will presumably be very appreciable gains in performance.

“‘Hey, [AMD] is leading,’ that’s over,” said Gelsinger. “We are back with a very defined view of what it requires to be leadership in every dimension: leadership product, leadership [chip] packaging, leadership process, leadership software, unquestioned leadership on critical new workloads like AI, graphics, media, power-performance, enabling again the ecosystem. This is what we will be doing with aggressive actions and programs over the next couple of years.”

“We won’t dismiss [AMD] of the good work that they’ve done,” Gelsinger admitted, “but that’s over with Alder Lake and Sapphire Rapids.”

The Intel CEO goes on to state that his company is still the best when it comes to products in their category, the supply situation, software assets, and more. Gelsinger also boasted of Intel’s market share, which sits at 80 percent despite some of the company’s recent fumbles.

“We have the best product,” Gelsinger said. “We have 80 percent market share. We have the best software assets that are available in the industry. We do the best job supporting our partners and our OEMs with it. We have an incredible brand that our channel partners, customers want and trust.”

“Intel is back. These are the best products in their category. We have the best supply situation. We have the best quality software assets. The most respected, venerable technology brand in the industry.”

This should be an interesting interview to come back to a couple years down the line.

Source: CRN

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15 Comments

  1. Well, Intel was so far ahead for so long it was hard to even imagine AMD getting back in the race. That said, almost all of Intel’s issues can be traced back to issues moving beyond their 14nm.

    It’s not hard to imagine that ~if~ that is fixed… Intel could get right back in the race. Intel seems pretty confident about this one, but two big factors remain: real life benchmarks (so far, we’ve just seen some leaked cherry picked stuff), and availability, as we don’t really know how well Intel 7 process node yields and capacity really are. After all, it won’t do them much good if they can’t put products in the hands of consumers, no matter how good it is.

    It appears Intel will just skip the forgettable 10nm and, with Alder Lake, go right to 7nm for the desktop (Ok, so it’s a renamed 10nm++ Super process, but hey, if it works, they can name it Rainbow Brite). And Alder represnts a big shift away from Skylake++++++ derivatives, so…

    I guess I’m saying I could believe Intel is ready to make a big jump back into the lead. It wouldn’t surprise me, and I’d love to see some more back and forth between AMD and Intel. But I’m not going to believe it just because Intel says it’s so. The proof will be in the pudding.

  2. I mean, I can quote myself both on here and on the Hardforums dating back 5 years to the launch of the first Ryzen.

    In those posts I’ve always said the same thing. To paraphrase myself: Intels manufacturing woes won’t last forever, and when they fix their manufacturing, they will be back. I hope AMD is planning for that.

    If AMD has rested on their laurels, they are screwed. Intel will just Core2Duo them again, just like they did in 2006. They need to have spent a SIGNIFICANT chunk of that revenue they ahve been getting from Ryzen chips into R&D to pump out future killer CPU’s, and if they haven’t it’s going to be 2010 all over again.

    Time will tell.

  3. So, he is saying that Intel has been in the also ran category for years now and is finally not in that category? Uh, ok. Well, that is a good thing to hang your hat on.

  4. I got my doubts about this. AMD has managed to develop a pretty prolific pipeline for the CPU offerings. Sure Intel can top ’em out but it’s a far cry from total dominance. From server-enterprise to consumer AMD still manages to pull ahead every now and then.

  5. I have a feeling it’s going to take more than die shrinks to best AMD at this point. I’d also have to guess that AMD has planned for this.

    Either way, we as consumers win. Competition pushes innovation.

  6. Oh man how ever will amd compete.. oh wait.. they have chiplets.. I dunno maybe they can. Time will tell.

  7. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 42142, member: 4″]
    I have a feeling it’s going to take more than die shrinks to best AMD at this point. I’d also have to guess that AMD has planned for this.

    Either way, we as consumers win. Competition pushes innovation.
    [/QUOTE]
    If we can get product…………

  8. I have no doubt Intel will pull ahead of AMD at some point. I just don’t know if that’s going to be as soon as Intel’s claiming it is. Intel’s R&D budget is enormous. Once they’ve solved the manufacturing issues, either in house or by outsourcing, they’ll eclipse AMD fairly quickly. This cycle has repeated itself before. Intel has only ever faltered a couple of times and even then, it can be argued that AMD had to time its best efforts when Intel was at their low points.

  9. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 42192, member: 6″]
    I have no doubt Intel will pull ahead of AMD at some point. I just don’t know if that’s going to be as soon as Intel’s claiming it is. Intel’s R&D budget is enormous. Once they’ve solved the manufacturing issues, either in house or by outsourcing, they’ll eclipse AMD fairly quickly. This cycle has repeated itself before. Intel has only ever faltered a couple of times and even then, it can be argued that AMD had to time its best efforts when Intel was at their low points.
    [/QUOTE]

    Strike when the enemy is at their weakest, defer otherwise.

  10. [QUOTE=”Paul_Johnson, post: 42191, member: 2″]
    If we can get product…………
    [/QUOTE]
    AMC CPU’s are available.

  11. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 42196, member: 4″]
    AMC CPU’s are available.
    [/QUOTE]
    Gamestonk to the moon!

  12. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 42196, member: 4″]
    AMC CPU’s are available.
    [/QUOTE]
    While AMD did have some tight CPU inventory early on, it’s not been impossible to get ahold of, and they are all pretty plentiful right now.

    I think Paul was talking about Intel inventory though – their inventory levels remain to be seen – unproven process node and all, and notoriously bad yields at anything less than 14nm (++++++) and over 20W. There has been more than one ghost SKU in Intel’s lineup in the past few years – where it shows up in a few reviews and a lot of benchmarks, but is no where to be found to purchase retail.

  13. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 42198, member: 96″]
    – their inventory levels remain to be seen –
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, it’s been like the mythical NV RTX 30 Series but with Intel, we’re now looking at 3 gens of x900Ks that people have to hunt to find. I admit I didn’t really track the 9900K launch but I’ve heard the stories with the challenges for 10900K and on.

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