Image: Activision

Cheating is about to get a whole lot harder in modern Call of Duty titles. Activision announced a new anti-cheat system called RICOCHET today, one that partially leverages a kernel-level driver to better assess what’s running on a player’s PC. RICOCHET’s backend anti-cheat security features will launch alongside Sledgehammer Games’ Call of Duty: Vanguard on November 5 and be added later this year to Call of Duty: Warzone, while the kernel driver will debut in Call of Duty: Warzone later this year.

From Call of Duty:

The RICOCHET Anti-Cheat initiative is a multi-faceted approach to combat cheating, featuring new server-side tools which monitor analytics to identify cheating, enhanced investigation processes to stamp out cheaters, updates to strengthen account security, and more. […]

In addition to server enhancements coming with RICOCHET Anti-Cheat is the launch of a new PC kernel-level driver, developed internally for the Call of Duty franchise, and launching first for Call of Duty: Warzone. This driver will assist in the identification of cheaters, reinforcing and strengthening the overall server security. […]

The Call of Duty staff has promised that RICOCHET’s kernel driver will operate only when Call of Duty: Warzone is running on a PC. The team clarified that the driver is not always-on and only monitors the software and applications that interact with the game.

Source: Call of Duty

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6 Comments

  1. Hmm. How are they implementing anti-cheat on consoles? (Don’t kid yourself that it doesn’t occur there too, it just isn’t as prevelent)

    Ok I get that it might be easier to monitor a user’s PC for cheats/hax. But I think they should be throwing their investment into being able to detect this stuff server-side. Sure, you can’t see what is running behind the scenes on a PC, but you can train some AI to detect things like movement that is too precise, or exceeds typical parameters, etc.

    That, or get in bed with the anti-malware folks and start flagging that stuff as malware using a tool that already exists at the kernel level and is already scanning for things similar to this.

    I wouldn’t ban people who wouldn’t agree to run the malware that you teamed up with, but I’d make the "official" servers and events require it. That way all the cheaters can go play with each other.

  2. Hmm. How are they implementing anti-cheat on consoles? (Don’t kid yourself that it doesn’t occur there too, it just isn’t as prevelent)

    Ok I get that it might be easier to monitor a user’s PC for cheats/hax. But I think they should be throwing their investment into being able to detect this stuff server-side. Sure, you can’t see what is running behind the scenes on a PC, but you can train some AI to detect things like movement that is too precise, or exceeds typical parameters, etc.

    That, or get in bed with the anti-malware folks and start flagging that stuff as malware using a tool that already exists at the kernel level and is already scanning for things similar to this.

    I wouldn’t ban people who wouldn’t agree to run the malware that you teamed up with, but I’d make the "official" servers and events require it. That way all the cheaters can go play with each other.

    Don’t fool yourself. Cheating on consoles is as easy as going to your local gamestop, walmart or best buy and buying a cronus zen. Don’t like recoil? No problem. Aim assist turned up to 11? You got it!

    Unless they are polling the USB ports for these devices they’ll never get rid of cheating of console.

  3. Yea because this won’t negatively impact the user experience at all. Oh and anti virus programs won’t freak over a new unknown kernel level driver nope that won’t happen.
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