Image: Intel

Intel’s next generation of Core processors may be less power hungry than anticipated thanks to a new feature called Digital Linear Voltage Regulator (DLVR). According to a patent published over the summer, DLVR can reduce CPU voltage by 160 mV, which translates to a 20 to 25 percent drop in CPU power consumption. A roadmap previously shared by VideoCardz seems to confirm that DLVR will be introduced with 13th Gen Intel Core “Raptor Lake” processors.

From the abstract:

A power supply architecture combines the benefits of a traditional single stage power delivery, when there are no additional power losses in the integrated VR with low VID and low CPU losses of FIVR (fully integrated voltage regulator) and D-LVR (digital linear voltage regulator). The D-LVR is not in series with the main power flow, but in parallel. By placing the digital-LVR in parallel to a primary VR (e.g., motherboard VR), the CPU VID is lowered and the processor core power consumption is lowered. The power supply architecture reduces the guard band for input power supply level, thereby reducing the overall power consumption because the motherboard VR specifications can be relaxed, saving cost and power. The power supply architecture drastically increases the CPU performance at a small extra cost for the silicon and low complexity of tuning.

Intel’s Raptor Lake chips will leverage a mix of Performance and Efficiency cores just like the current generation of Alder Lake processors. Some of the SKUs will reportedly feature up to 16 Efficiency cores, with support for faster next-generation memory such as DDR-5600.

Source: FPO (via r/intel, VideoCardz)

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7 Comments

  1. Yea… but all cpus are great at reducing power consumption when not tasked. It’s getting better efficiency when heavily tasked that’s the real win.

  2. The article says “Overall power consumtion”, but I am skeptical like Grimlakin.

    25% of 250W is … still 188W, which puts it almost on par with Zen.

    And that’s assuming it works under load and not just something to help idle or low load conditions.

  3. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 43862, member: 96″]
    The article says “Overall power consumtion”, but I am skeptical like Grimlakin.

    25% of 250W is … still 188W, which puts it almost on par with Zen.

    And that’s assuming it works under load and not just something to help idle or low load conditions.
    [/QUOTE]
    My bet is since these are more big/little systems. When idol it will simply shut down the big cores to negate a lot of power consumption to even keep idol CPU’s in a wait state. I’m also betting that MS will have a few patches before they are doing that call smoothly.

  4. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 43862, member: 96″]
    25% of 250W is … still 188W, which puts it almost on par with Zen.
    [/QUOTE]
    Intel is really not going to be able to live opening up the 12900K down – the CPU is more efficient per watt on average [I]until[/I] you ask it to boost for that last little sliver of performance!

  5. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 43887, member: 1367″]
    Intel is really not going to be able to live opening up the 12900K down – the CPU is more efficient per watt on average [I]until[/I] you ask it to boost for that last little sliver of performance!
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, I mean, it’s cool that it ~can~ boost that hard.

    But on the other hand:

    It’s a shame that is ~has~ to boost that hard to catch up. And that they let it boost that hard on stock settings. And that they changed their definition of TDP to try to be shady about it. And that one of the best things they can say about Gen 13 is “We can get power almost back down to where it was before”

  6. It [I]is[/I] a shame that they do have to boost that high, but it’s also the top-end K-part. And while they don’t list it as a 241W SKU, I didn’t see any beating around the bush about it either.

    What’s more interesting is that the lesser 12700K and so on, with their more ‘sane’ defaults, flip the story on its head and add insult to injury with their MSRPs.

  7. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 43890, member: 1367″]
    flip the story on its head and add insult to injury with their MSRPs.
    [/QUOTE]
    This I will give you – Intel is pricing them very aggressively, especially for their performance.

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