Image: Samsung

Samsung has confirmed that it will be building a new and advanced semiconductor fab site in the city of Taylor, Texas. The project, which is estimated to cost around $17 billion, represents that largest investment that the South Korean manufacturing giant has ever made in the U.S. Samsung’s Taylor site is expected to go online in the second half of 2024.

From Samsung’s announcement:

[…] The estimated $17 billion investment in the United States will help boost production of advanced logic semiconductor solutions that power next-generation innovations and technologies.

The new facility will manufacture products based on advanced process technologies for application in areas such as mobile, 5G, high-performance computing (HPC) and artificial intelligence (AI). Samsung remains committed to supporting customers globally by making advanced semiconductor fabrication more accessible and meeting surging demand for leading-edge products.

“As we add a new facility in Taylor, Samsung is laying the groundwork for another important chapter in our future,” said Kinam Kim, Vice Chairman and CEO, Samsung Electronics Device Solutions Division. “With greater manufacturing capacity, we will be able to better serve the needs of our customers and contribute to the stability of the global semiconductor supply chain.”

“We are also proud to be bringing more jobs and supporting the training and talent development for local communities, as Samsung celebrates 25 years of semiconductor manufacturing in the U.S.,” Kim said.

“In addition to our partners in Texas, we are grateful to the Biden Administration for creating an environment that supports companies like Samsung as we work to expand leading-edge semiconductor manufacturing in the U.S.,” continued Kim. “We also thank the administration and Congress for their bipartisan support to swiftly enact federal incentives for domestic chip production and innovation.”

“Companies like Samsung continue to invest in Texas because of our world-class business climate and exceptional workforce,” said Governor Greg Abbott. “Samsung’s new semiconductor manufacturing facility in Taylor will bring countless opportunities for hardworking Central Texans and their families and will play a major role in our state’s continued exceptionalism in the semiconductor industry. I look forward to expanding our partnership to keep the Lone Star State a leader in advanced technology and a dynamic economic powerhouse.”

Source: Samsung

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13 Comments

  1. Having more silicon fab capacity in the world is a great thing.

    Having it in the U.S. is even better.

    I’m not a fan of government picking winners and losers via subsidies and tax breaks though, at least not outside of strategic goals.

    Leave tax rates the same for everyone, give no one subsidies, and let the market decide who wins.

  2. The incentives / tax breaks are more to lure a big player like this in your back yard, so that you can collect on all that tax revenue.

    You may give the big business a break, but all those workers are going to move in with their families, eat out in the area, use local retailers, pay local property taxes, etc.

  3. The incentives / tax breaks are more to lure a big player like this in your back yard, so that you can collect on all that tax revenue.

    You may give the big business a break, but all those workers are going to move in with their families, eat out in the area, use local retailers, pay local property taxes, etc.

    Yeah, but then these huge multinationals just play different jurisdictions against each other. It becomes a race to the bottom. It’s kind of shameful.

  4. The incentives / tax breaks are more to lure a big player like this in your back yard, so that you can collect on all that tax revenue.

    You may give the big business a break, but all those workers are going to move in with their families, eat out in the area, use local retailers, pay local property taxes, etc.

    Property taxes in Texas are pretty horrid. At least we don’t pay it on vehicles. That’s something.

  5. Yeah, but then these huge multinationals just play different jurisdictions against each other. It becomes a race to the bottom. It’s kind of shameful.

    Not to mention, from the studies I’ve seen, the communities almost always come out on the bad side of the deal. Wisconsin got royally screwed by Foxconn, Sunnyvale (?) has service and budget problems due to their deal with Apple, etc.

  6. Not to mention, from the studies I’ve seen, the communities almost always come out on the bad side of the deal. Wisconsin got royally screwed by Foxconn, Sunnyvale (?) has service and budget problems due to their deal with Apple, etc.

    They also never employ the number of people they say they will in their proposals.

  7. Not to mention, from the studies I’ve seen, the communities almost always come out on the bad side of the deal. Wisconsin got royally screwed by Foxconn, Sunnyvale (?) has service and budget problems due to their deal with Apple, etc.

    Yeah FC royally screwed Wisconsin bad on that one.

  8. Wait till the water pipes freezes over and the power collapses… Hey at least we will be part of the excuse for scarcity of chips and high prices.
  9. Wait till the water pipes freezes over and the power collapses… Hey at least we will be part of the excuse for scarcity of chips and high prices.

    Wasn’t there power outages in Texas over the summer too when it was too hot? Chip supply can be constrained in the winter when it’s too cold and in the summer when it’s too hot!

  10. Wasn’t there power outages in Texas over the summer too when it was too hot? Chip supply can be constrained in the winter when it’s too cold and in the summer when it’s too hot!

    Wait till the water pipes freezes over and the power collapses… Hey at least we will be part of the excuse for scarcity of chips and high prices.

    I’m always surprised when I hear that a business for which outages are so costly does not have battery supoorted diesel generators on standby….

  11. I’m always surprised when I hear that a business for which outages are so codtöy does not have battery supoorted diesel generators on standby….

    That is exactly what I do for a living and it shocks me as well. People get used to paying the utility rate, and are shocked when it costs more to have something more reliable.

  12. That is exactly what I do for a living and it shocks me as well. People get used to paying the utility rate, and are shocked when it costs more to have something more reliable.

    These same companies could easily have reduced power cost with solar and heat pumps where available.

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