Image: NVIDIA

A GeForce RTX 2060 revival with additional memory is definitely happening. This is according to the release notes for the latest GeForce Game Ready driver (497.09), which includes a features and changes section (p. 8) that confirms new support for a “GeForce RTX 2060 12 GB.” The Turing-based card is also listed in the table of supported desktop GPUs near the end of the document.

NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 2060 (12 GB) is expected to launch on December 7, 2021. Recent reports suggest that the graphics card will feature 2,176 CUDA cores, which would put it in line with the GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER. The original GeForce RTX 2060 and GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER feature a memory size of 6 GB and 8 GB, respectively.

Source: NVIDIA

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3 Comments

  1. I honestly do not understand all this old product recycling. Unless they have a huge backlog of old GPU components they can slap together just to have something to sell… but if they are having to actively produce new silicon, that seems like a waste of resources that could be making new stuff?

  2. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 44556, member: 297″]
    I honestly do not understand all this old product recycling. Unless they have a huge backlog of old GPU components they can slap together just to have something to sell… but if they are having to actively produce new silicon, that seems like a waste of resources that could be making new stuff?
    [/QUOTE]
    It doesn’t work that way. RTX 2000 series cards have no impact on the 3000 series production lines.

    The older GPU’s are produced on a different process that’s not at the same capacity as Samsung’s 8nm process or TSMC’s 7nm processes. They only have so much production capacity. The RTX 2000 series is built on a 12nm process and its easier to get fab time for that. Plus, many 2000 series cards are still viable on the market as they are reasonably good performers.

  3. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 44581, member: 6″]
    The older GPU’s are produced on a different process that’s not at the same capacity as Samsung’s 8nm process or TSMC’s 7nm processes.
    [/QUOTE]
    The GPU core itself isn’t, but there are a lot of common parts on the cards, like VRMs, display drivers, and VRAM, some of which are constrained as well.

    So I wouldn’t say it has no impact.

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