Image: Phillip Pessar

RadioShack, the ancient retailer that people used to visit eons ago for electronic gadgets and accessories such as power plugs and audio cables, has re-emerged as a cryptocurrency company.

The brand’s new business venture has been confirmed via its newly launched website, which explains how the company will be “bringing cryptocurrency to the mainstream” with key technologies embraced by proponents of DeFi (decentralized finance), a blockchain-based form of finance that aims to put monetary control strictly into the hands of its users. They include a RadioShack Swap platform, which will allow cryptocurrency investors to swap coins similar to existing sites such as Uniswap, as well as a new token called RADIO.

“Blockchain technology has rapidly evolved into a mind-blowing multiplicity of sectors: currencies, centralized exchanges, derivatives, lending, swaps, synthetics, etc.,” RadioShack wrote in a post explaining why it was beginning its cryptocurrency quest with a swap and the potential profits that it could bring to the company.

“Yet the concept of a swap stands out first and foremost as the place of low-hanging fruit – fruit that is spinning off incredible levels of net profit. Profit not just from speculation like Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, but ones born out of trading fees.”

“Some existing swaps like Uniswap or Sushiswap reportedly are doing $1-$7 million net profit per day! They are the current profitable forces of nature in the DeFi world.”

RadioShack was acquired by Retail Ecommerce Ventures (REV) in November 2020 after failing in the retail market and having to file for Chapter 22 bankruptcy. The brand now partially exists as an online store, which, according to REV executives, still manages strong sales.

Source: RadioShack

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8 Comments

  1. I was having a convo the other day with someone about how sad it was that Shack went down the tubes, due to Commodore level incompetent mis-management. I think a small reboot of Radio Shack stores could be profitable today if they focused on the right products.

    But this…. not like this…. not like this…

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  2. Like those episodes of Young Sheldon, I too was a nerd who loved to go to Radio Shack in my childhood. From looking at parts to toys, various devices, and yes, computers, it was an awesome place to go. I also remember how sad I felt throughout the 90s and 2000s as I watched disintegrate and fade away. I also wanted it to make a comeback, but not like this. There’s a chance they may strike gold with this but it’s still not the kind of legacy I want to remember them for.

    Edit: My first x86 computer was a Tandy 1000EX that my dad bought me for Christmas back in the day. Eventually, I installed the math coprocessor for it. That thing rocked. It replaced my first computer, the Atari 400 I mention in my bio. Some of the first computers I got to learn about were from people using various TRS80s Model IIIs in the early 80s. Good times.

  3. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 45485, member: 87″]
    Like those episodes of Young Sheldon, I too was a nerd who loved to go to Radio Shack in my childhood. From looking at parts to toys, various devices, and yes, computers, it was an awesome place to go. I also remember how sad I felt throughout the 90s and 2000s as I watched disintegrate and fade away. I also wanted it to make a comeback, but not like this. There’s a chance they may strike gold with this but it’s still not the kind of legacy I want to remember them for.

    Edit: My first x86 computer was a Tandy 1000EX that my dad bought me for Christmas back in the day. Eventually, I installed the math coprocessor for it. That thing rocked. It replaced my first computer, the Atari 400 I mention in my bio. Some of the first computers I got to learn about were from people using various TRS80s Model IIIs in the early 80s. Good times.
    [/QUOTE]
    We have very similar starting computer experiences. My first computer was the Atari 400 as well, and was able to move up to the IBM PC (My uncle was an Inventor for them, so I got the Employee Discount). We had TRS-80’s in Elementary school, and the TRS-80 Model III’s in Middle school. Those were some good times!

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