Image: CES

CES will now end a day earlier on January 7 to mitigate the risks of COVID-19.

“As the world’s most influential technology event, CES is steadfast in its pledge to be the gathering place to showcase products and discuss ideas that will ultimately make our lives better,” said Gary Shapiro (President and CEO, CTA). “We are shortening the show to three days and have put in place comprehensive health measures for the safety of all attendees and participants.”

The Omicron variant continues to rapidly spread. Many have switched from in-person to virtual events. One of the latest is KIOXIA, which is expected to showcase PCIe 5.0 SSDs and flash memory. The company had teased speeds up to 15 GB/s for a prototype drive at the 2021 Flash Memory Summit (CFMS).

KIOXIA America has been reviewing the latest information on the rapidly evolving public health environment, and after careful consideration has decided to cancel our on-site presence at CES 2022 in Las Vegas. Instead, we will focus on support of our virtual digital activities at CES where we will highlight our latest flash memory and SSD innovations through the CES digital exhibitor venue, and our own virtual booth platform. The health and well-being of our employees, customers, and collaborators are the ultimate priority and though we are unable to get together in-person at the show we are exploring future opportunities, and hope that we will be able to connect digitally during the event.

In tandem with this decision, KIOXIA has decided to select a future date in 2022 to kick off the celebration of its commemoration of the 35th anniversary of the invention of NAND flash.

“As we look to CES 2022, we confront a tough choice,” Shapiro added. “If we cancel the show, we will hurt thousands of smaller companies, entrepreneurs, and innovators who have made investments in building their exhibits and are counting on CES for their business, inspiration, and future.”

Sources: CES (via The Verge), OC3D, Las Vegas Review-Journal

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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

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26 Comments

  1. Things will never go back to being the same, from the first covid, and it shouldn’t and I just do not understand the pillar of salt here that people are dying, literally, to get back out there to do the same reckless stuff (vaccine/boosters are not working) that has mostly helped to increase these new hourly cases.

    There will always be an “unknown pathogen” that will arise, one worst than the other, and until that is seared in people’s minds, cases will continue to rise.

  2. [QUOTE=”GunShot, post: 45995, member: 1790″]
    Things will never go back to being the same, from the first covid, and it shouldn’t and I just do not understand the pillar of salt here that people are dying, literally, to get back out there to do the same reckless stuff (vaccine/boosters are not working) that has mostly helped to increase these new hourly cases.

    There will always be an “unknown pathogen” that will arise, one worst than the other, and until that is seared in people’s minds, cases will continue to rise.
    [/QUOTE]
    [MEDIA=youtube]_Jtpf8N5IDE[/MEDIA]

  3. [QUOTE=”GunShot, post: 45995, member: 1790″]
    Things will never go back to being the same, from the first covid, and it shouldn’t and I just do not understand the pillar of salt here that people are dying, literally, to get back out there to do the same reckless stuff (vaccine/boosters are not working) that has mostly helped to increase these new hourly cases.

    There will always be an “unknown pathogen” that will arise, one worst than the other, and until that is seared in people’s minds, cases will continue to rise.
    [/QUOTE]
    lol….you’re more than welcome to stay in your hole and be a good little subject.

  4. [QUOTE=”GunShot, post: 45995, member: 1790″]
    Things will never go back to being the same, from the first covid, and it shouldn’t and I just do not understand the pillar of salt here that people are dying, literally, to get back out there to do the same reckless stuff (vaccine/boosters are not working) that has mostly helped to increase these new hourly cases.

    There will always be an “unknown pathogen” that will arise, one worst than the other, and until that is seared in people’s minds, cases will continue to rise.
    [/QUOTE]
    [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 46000, member: 4″]
    lol….you’re more than welcome to stay in your hole and be a good little subject.
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t think it matters much how much I do, or do not, worry about covid any more.

    The issue is that everyone else still is, or isn’t. Society, by definition, consists of more than one person – and it’s all the other people that are ruining it for me.

  5. How dafaq ever said anything about locking yourself down inside/live in a bubble?

    If that is what you got from “things will never be the same”, well, you have very poor comprehension skills.

    If being vigilant and aware constitutes a bubble in ” your” eye, well, call me Bubble Boy.

  6. The FPS Review mobile version could benefit from some updated features for 2022, e.g. editing, etc., you know?!

  7. I would hope everyone here is contributing to folding at home for sprint 11 of the Covid moonshot. Given that a non trivial part of society appears to be incapable of simple preventative measures, a cheap anti viral pill appears to be the next best option. Your compute cycles can help.

  8. [QUOTE=”GunShot, post: 45995, member: 1790″]
    Things will never go back to being the same, from the first covid, and it shouldn’t and I just do not understand the pillar of salt here that people are dying, literally, to get back out there to do the same reckless stuff (vaccine/boosters are not working) that has mostly helped to increase these new hourly cases.

    There will always be an “unknown pathogen” that will arise, one worst than the other, and until that is seared in people’s minds, cases will continue to rise.
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s exactly why it is pointless to ruin the economy and people’s lives / morale with useless mandates that do nothing.

    Every life counts sounds good on a political ad, but when you realize that saving every last person means ruining the life of millions, it is perhaps not such a good idea.

    Why didn’t we want to save everyone during flu seasons? A lot of people died of the flu every year, yet nobody said anything about locking down entire countries and making travel more restricted than during the soviet union.

    I fully supported lockdowns before vaccinations had begun, but we can’t have them forever.

    Making events only attendable by a few privileged people is creating a new underclass, of lesser citizens. I’ve literally had to put my life on hold since early 2020, I could do nothing I planned due to ever changing travel restrictions and mandates. Enough is enough.

  9. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 46011, member: 1298″]
    That’s exactly why it is pointless to ruin the economy and people’s lives / morale with useless mandates that do nothing.

    Every life counts sounds good on a political ad, but when you realize that saving every last person means ruining the life of millions, it is perhaps not such a good idea.

    Why didn’t we want to save everyone during flu seasons? A lot of people died of the flu every year, yet nobody said anything about locking down entire countries and making travel more restricted than during the soviet union.

    I fully supported lockdowns before vaccinations had begun, but we can’t have them forever.

    Making events only attendable by a few privileged people is creating a new underclass, of lesser citizens. I’ve literally had to put my life on hold since early 2020, I could do nothing I planned due to ever changing travel restrictions and mandates. Enough is enough.
    [/QUOTE]
    It appears you’ve taken the red pill and jumped I to the red pool.

    Just take a look at the numbers here.

    [URL]https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/dashboards/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6[/URL]

    it’s not small.

  10. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 46022, member: 215″]
    It appears you’ve taken the red pill and jumped I to the red pool.

    Just take a look at the numbers here.

    [URL]https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/dashboards/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6[/URL]

    it’s not small.
    [/QUOTE]
    No one is stopping you from living the rest of your life in fear hermet’d up in your house.

    Just don’t expect everyone else to do the same. Or try to impose that on everyone else.

    We’re not scared.

  11. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 46023, member: 4″]
    No one is stopping you from living the rest of your life in fear hermet’d up in your house.

    Just don’t expect everyone else to do the same. Or try to impose that on everyone else.

    We’re not scared.
    [/QUOTE]

    It’s hilarious… that people are freaked out about getting shots and such. I’m not saying don’t go out. My family is doing activities and such normally but we are also current on our shots and grew up with the mantra of rub some dirt in it. So yea we understand exposure builds tolerance but getting the shots helps build it FASTER. America is on a slippery slope with this just like we are with every other issue that impinges our convenience…. but that’s another story.

  12. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 46035, member: 215″]
    It’s hilarious… that people are freaked out about getting shots and such. I’m not saying don’t go out. My family is doing activities and such normally but we are also current on our shots and grew up with the mantra of rub some dirt in it. So yea we understand exposure builds tolerance but getting the shots helps build it FASTER. America is on a slippery slope with this just like we are with every other issue that impinges our convenience…. but that’s another story.
    [/QUOTE]

    Sounds to me like you are a subject, and not in control of your own life or decisions.

  13. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 46050, member: 4″]
    Sounds to me like you are a subject, and not in control of your own life or decisions.
    [/QUOTE]
    The reasonable, science informed populace made their decisions and got vaccinated in mid 2020. The unreasonable, the ignorant, and the stubborn are finally getting the decision made for them. Unfortunately, there was much too much waiting deploying the stick, and we’re increasingly looking at Covid becoming endemic .

  14. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 46060, member: 1041″]
    The reasonable, science informed populace made their decisions and got vaccinated in mid 2020. The unreasonable, the ignorant, and the stubborn are finally getting the decision made for them. Unfortunately, there was much too much waiting deploying the stick, and we’re increasingly looking at Covid becoming endemic .
    [/QUOTE]

    It seldomly ends well for early adopters. Some of the first vaccinations of the polio virus back in the 50s was a huge failure. Caused children to lose limbs or die from it. Sure, our medical capabilities are far superior to those from the 50s; but not a single person on this planet has any idea of the long term problems those vaccines can have.

    So, years from now when I’m watching late night TV and their is an ad about getting receiving compensation from receiving the first doses of the COVID vaccine I’ll be happy to know that I’m not one of them.

    Additionally, if the vaccine works. Then it shouldn’t matter if I get it or not.

    PS
    I’ve already had COVID; or at least I was informed after having a test. I’d rather get COVID every year than get the seasonal flu.
    COVID? Was tired, slight fever for about a day or two.
    FLU? I’m done for the week or more.

  15. [QUOTE=”LeRoy_Blanchard, post: 46063, member: 137″]
    It seldomly ends well for early adopters. Some of the first vaccinations of the polio virus back in the 50s was a huge failure. Caused children to lose limbs or die from it. Sure, our medical capabilities are far superior to those from the 50s; but not a single person on this planet has any idea of the long term problems those vaccines can have.

    So, years from now when I’m watching late night TV and their is an ad about getting receiving compensation from receiving the first doses of the COVID vaccine I’ll be happy to know that I’m not one of them.

    Additionally, if the vaccine works. Then it shouldn’t matter if I get it or not.

    PS
    I’ve already had COVID; or at least I was informed after having a test. I’d rather get COVID every year than get the seasonal flu.
    COVID? Was tired, slight fever for about a day or two.
    FLU? I’m done for the week or more.
    [/QUOTE]
    What percentage qualifies as “seldom”? If it’s common for vaccines to have significant issues, can you point to examples more recent than 70 years ago? Can you cite issues with the chicken pox vaccine, for example, which is much more recent?

  16. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 46064, member: 1041″]
    What percentage qualifies as “seldom”? If it’s common for vaccines to have significant issues, can you point to examples more recent than 70 years ago? Can you cite issues with the chicken pox vaccine, for example, which is much more recent?
    [/QUOTE]

    [URL]https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/new-drugs-found-cause-side-effects-years-after-approval-n757526[/URL]

    Of the 222 drugs approved by the FDA from 2001 through 2010, nearly 1/3 (33%) of them ended up with unexpected, sometimes life-threatening side effects or complications.

    Including serious skin reactions, liver damage, cancer and even death.

    Most of those side effects were not seen during the initial review process.

    However, keep in mind that even though they were later discovered it was still considered a “success”.

  17. [QUOTE=”LeRoy_Blanchard, post: 46066, member: 137″]
    [URL]https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/new-drugs-found-cause-side-effects-years-after-approval-n757526[/URL]

    Of the 222 drugs approved by the FDA from 2001 through 2010, nearly 1/3 (33%) of them ended up with unexpected, sometimes life-threatening side effects or complications.

    Including serious skin reactions, liver damage, cancer and even death.

    Most of those side effects were not seen during the initial review process.

    However, keep in mind that even though they were later discovered it was still considered a “success”.
    [/QUOTE]

    I love how you call out the polio vaccine. A mandatory program that eradicated for the most part polio in the United States.

  18. Typical drug trials will be stopped and re-evaluated after 4 deaths, and completely halted after 10.

    Pfizer has admitted that their “vaccine” is responsible for 1200 deaths in the first 3 months of use. Australia is trying to come up with a program to compensate the 67,000 people who succumbed to life altering adverse reactions to the vaccine, and over 30,000 deaths.

    You want to be a guinea pig? Go for it. Hopefully you don’t become one of their statistics.

  19. So, getting this back on topic, this isn’t that big of a deal to end the show early. When I was out there two years ago, many booths were packing up on day 2 or 3 and the place was a ghost town by day 4. Keep in mind that media day(s) start before the actual show – so media are there 2 days before the start and stick around for maybe 2 days of the show.

    Given that, I think it’s more trying to prevent pictures of empty exhibit halls from the last day from circulating and being able to declare victory for a different reason…

  20. [QUOTE=”David_Schroth, post: 46081, member: 1″]
    So, getting this back on topic, this isn’t that big of a deal to end the show early. When I was out there two years ago, many booths were packing up on day 2 or 3 and the place was a ghost town by day 4. Keep in mind that media day(s) start before the actual show – so media are there 2 days before the start and stick around for maybe 2 days of the show.

    Given that, I think it’s more trying to prevent pictures of empty exhibit halls from the last day from circulating and being able to declare victory for a different reason…
    [/QUOTE]

    That’s a good point. While I’d love to go down the misinformation rabbit hole… I’ll leave that for a more appropriate forum. You’re probably right here that and cutting cost for 1 day of event (cleanup) might be more appealing then keeping it officially open for a day nobody is there.

  21. I’m looking forward to AMD’s release of ZEN info for the future… That’s about it. PCIe Gen 5 SSDs and 8K displays don’t excite me currently..

  22. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 46085, member: 52″]
    I’m looking forward to AMD’s release of ZEN info for the future… That’s about it. PCIe Gen 5 SSDs and 8K displays don’t excite me currently..
    [/QUOTE]
    I’m in the same boat. Really feeling the hype of the 6000 series Apu’s.

    Everything else, meh.

  23. We just need to drop the COVID crap! It’s the biggest excuse now for the worst customer service. As an example, having your paid hotel room cleaned only once after you stay for 7 days. Meaning no service for you if you stay for say 4 days. It’s insane. Me and wife got Moderna and the booster. We’ve done all that we can. We’ll wear masks when required and take any precautions that may be mandated. But if we’re vaccinated and shed it to someone that is not, it’s on them now. There’s been more than enough vaccine and opportunity for anyone that needs one to get one. We need to get back to some ‘normalcy’ and stop using OMG COVID as an excuse. Additionally, it’s a highly survivable virus. “We’re closing a day early because of COVID” is ridiculous. /RANT

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