Image: Micron

Micron has successfully developed the world’s first M.2 2230 NVMe SSD with 2 TB of storage space.

The memory giant shared the announcement in a press release published today, one that also confirmed the company’s initial shipment of the industry’s first 176-layer QLC NAND. Micron’s new 2 TB 2230 NVMe SSD is part of its new Micron 2400 SSD lineup, which leverages a PCIe Gen 4 interface for sequential read and write speeds of up to 4500 and 4000 MB/s, respectively.

“The Micron 2400 SSD is […] the world’s only 2TB 22x30mm M.2 SSD,” Micron confirmed in its press release before going on to explain the benefits of the smaller form factor compared to traditional M.2 2280 drives.

“This form factor shrinks the physical space required by 63% when compared with a 22x80mm M.2 form factor, providing design flexibility and making the drive ideal for small, mobile laptop designs,” explained Micron. “It is also available in 22x42mm and 22x80mm M.2 form factors, all with common firmware to minimize design qualification efforts.”

Micron’s new lineup of 2400 NVMe SSDs come in three capacities: 512 GB, 1 TB, and 2 TB. The 2 TB version features an endurance rating of 600 TBW.

Source: Micron

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11 Comments

  1. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 46634, member: 215″]
    Does that seem slow for pcie 4.x to anyone else?
    [/QUOTE]
    It is crammed on a tiny postage-stamp sized board

  2. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 46651, member: 4″]
    I’d imagine these are more for datacenter storage density.
    [/QUOTE]
    Actually these seem to be targeted to very tight space setups. Datacenters and vendors like Samsung would just stick with the same form factor they use and just increase density of chips. These retail designed ones would probably target ultra thin laptops and the like. Maybe a DVR or two.

  3. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 46634, member: 215″]
    Does that seem slow for pcie 4.x to anyone else?
    [/QUOTE]

    Lots of reasons for this:

    It’s a lot to do with the controller, not a lot of room in this size for the best controllers, or largest controllers, and they generally get pretty hot, where again this doesn’t have a lot of space to spread the heat out or dissipate the heat from that controller.

    Does it even have a DRAM cache? Can’t tell, seems like there isn’t enough room.

    It’s QLC, so that’s got its own problems for performance and endurance already.

  4. physically bigger drives get more chips which leads to more bandwith higher speeds as you can read/write more chips at the same time, kinda like raid 0

  5. I think the tiny ones are going to be for laptops/portable devices. Datacenters don’t care about a 2 inch difference in the nvme. The nvme raid cards I have seen and installed (for cisco ucs) are still pretty tiny and hold 4 drives, smaller than a deck of cards. Only problem is they are internal and not hot swappable.

    Storage technology has come a LONG way from the 18-72gb 3.5 SCSI drives I was swapping out of HP servers in 2004. At this point even the 2.5 high capacity SSDs we use seem antiquated. There is something satisfying about seeing racks of 4tb SSDs arrays though.

  6. When it comes to SSD/NVME a big deal for data centers is the lifecycle of the drive and the speed in equal measure. If it can’t handle 400+ complete writes it’s really questionable on durability.

  7. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 46700, member: 297″]
    I think the tiny ones are going to be for laptops/portable devices. Datacenters don’t care about a 2 inch difference in the nvme. The nvme raid cards I have seen and installed (for cisco ucs) are still pretty tiny and hold 4 drives, smaller than a deck of cards. Only problem is they are internal and not hot swappable.

    Storage technology has come a LONG way from the 18-72gb 3.5 SCSI drives I was swapping out of HP servers in 2004. At this point even the 2.5 high capacity SSDs we use seem antiquated. There is something satisfying about seeing racks of 4tb SSDs arrays though.
    [/QUOTE]

    Datacenters most certainly care about 2 inches. Rack space is not infinite, and density matters. You don’t always need bleeding edge IOPS. We just had a 6 PB nvme array delivered that’s replacing a 800 TB array, and we’re getting back 4U of rack space.

  8. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 46712, member: 4″]
    Datacenters most certainly care about 2 inches. Rack space is not infinite, and density matters. You don’t always need bleeding edge IOPS. We just had a 6 PB nvme array delivered that’s replacing a 800 TB array, and we’re getting back 4U of rack space.
    [/QUOTE]
    I garuntee the number of writes per disk of what you just installed is far greater than what micron just released. Yes density is nice to a limit. At some point it becomes too many eggs in one basket or arrays would be running on micro SD cards. Because density.

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