Image: Warner Bros.

Theaters in the near future are unlikely to project anything aside from expensive blockbusters such as Marvel’s superhero films.

This is according to Ben Affleck, who was recently interviewed by Matt Damon for the latest issue of Entertainment Weekly and discussed some of his thoughts regarding the movie business. One prediction that Affleck made was that studios would no longer invest in smaller projects for theatrical release, resulting in less variety at the cinema.

“If I had to bet, a drama like Argo would not be made theatrically now,” Affleck said regarding the 2012 historical drama thriller, which he directed and went on to win multiple Oscars including Best Motion Picture of the Year.

“That wasn’t that long ago. It would be a limited series. I think movies in theaters are going to become more expensive, event-ized. They’re mostly going to be for younger people, and mostly about ‘Hey, I’m so into the Marvel Universe, I can’t wait to see what happens next.’ And there’ll be 40 movies a year theatrically, probably, all IP, sequel, animated.”

Affleck also brought up Ridley Scott’s The Last Duel, which he starred in alongside Damon. While the movie flopped at the theater, the actor pointed out that the movie managed to reach number one on iTunes, proving that there was still an audience for these kinds of epics.

The Last Duel really clinched it for me. I’ve had bad movies that didn’t work and I didn’t blink. I know why people didn’t go — because they weren’t good. But I liked what we did. I like what we had to say. I’m really proud of it. So I was really confused. And then to see that it did well on streaming, I thought, ‘Well, there you go. That’s where the audience is.'”

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Don’t Miss Out on More FPS Review Content!

Our weekly newsletter includes a recap of our reviews and a run down of the most popular tech news that we published.

Join the Conversation

6 Comments

  1. The more skins the studios can peel off a movie the more money they make, so even if theaters will make less money in the future they’ll still push every movie they can to theaters, then release to home streaming, then physical media. As long as they can make more than what it costs to release movies in theaters they’ll release them.

  2. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 46684, member: 1298″]
    The more skins the studios can peel off a movie the more money they make, so even if theaters will make less money in the future they’ll still push every movie they can to theaters, then release to home streaming, then physical media. As long as they can make more than what it costs to release movies in theaters they’ll release them.
    [/QUOTE]
    On one hand, you have a point. What does it cost to distribute a film to a theater? The reel it’s printed on? Maybe nothing if it’s a digital file format? The cost is all sunk in the making of the movie and advertising, it costs almost nothing to distribute, so why not make the net as wide as possible.

    On the other, all those theaters have quite a lot of overhead. If you are only filling a handful of seats in a big arena, costs have to go up to cover. And there is a definite cost at which people just stop coming. Smaller films aren’t going to make positive returns for theaters, so they will just stop carrying them.

    I can very easily see movie theaters going like concerts and other big venues. You’ll have the big productions, and they will be turned into big events to make it worth while to travel to the theater – and those events will be like a circus. The number of seats goes down, but the price goes up, and they will try to keep as long a tail on that big release window as they can. All the smaller stuff will just go direct-to-streaming deals. And stuff in-between might see a limited theatrical release or simultaneous theater and to-streaming.

  3. Oh Ben….. Go have a drink.

    Honestly, the older I get, the more I wait till I can see a release at home. Dollar General got pop corn and Shasta a lot cheaper than snacks at the theater.
    No ding bats talking, bumping my seat, crop dusting, sub arctic AC, 40 mins of new releases, spliced in bits of porn, crappy parking.

    I did like the Fork and Spoon AMC in Olathe tho. Burger, drinks can be served during the movie, and there is more space between people. Why leave home though, when I have rum and a grill?

    I enjoyed theaters as a kid, but does that fit in today for the instant gratification crowd these days?

  4. He’s not wrong. And for anyone in Hollywood to actually acknowledge this fact is progress.

    I wonder if we will see the mainstream movie theaters (AMC, Cinemark, etc) converge their theaters into more general entertainment nodes. I have already seen one place near me that is movies PLUS bowling/arcade/pool/bar etc. If the # of theatrical releases goes way down, Cinemark and the like would be wise to convert empty theater rooms into something else.

  5. Leave the smaller releases to Angelica theaters and the like. Those that want the more interesting and quieter movie experiences, but still a theater experience. There is a lot to be said for that and before covid I was comfortable paying a ticket premium to go see movies at one of those. 1. The releases were more limited. 2. The theaters were smaller. 3. The overall experience was actually more premium.

    Now I go almost exclusively to B&B theaters for the marquee experience with balcony seating and chair service for drinks and food. (Though now with covid you have to order before you go in. They still bring it to your seat.)

Leave a comment