Image: AMD

Intel’s Extreme Memory Profile 3.0 (XMP 3.0) allows owners of select Z690 motherboards for 12th Gen Core processors to easily overclock their DDR5 memory, but AMD users will have something similar to play with when the company’s next-generation hardware rolls out.

As reported by ComputerBase, AMD’s AM5 platform will include a new feature dubbed “AMD RAMP,” which is essentially red team’s version of Intel’s XMP 3.0. A successor to A-XMP and AMP, RAMP stands for Ryzen Accelerated Memory Profile and should allow DDR5 memory on Ryzen 7000 systems to easily be overclocked beyond JEDEC specifications on supported hardware.

“Since hardly any RAM manufacturer does without Intel’s XMP standard, it can be assumed that AMD’s counterpart will work in a very similar way,” ComputerBase theorized.

“DDR5 memory modules that support AMD RAMP will therefore probably also support Intel XMP 3.0 and vice versa. Nevertheless, there should be a selection of memory bars explicitly for AMD Ryzen 7000, at least for marketing something like it always works in the past.”

Support for AMD RAMP may initially be found on only a handful of the first premium AM5 motherboards. Intel’s XMP 3.0 is currently officially supported on only 22 Z690 motherboards, according to a chart shared by the company.

Source: ComputerBase

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9 Comments

  1. Surprised that they felt a need to offer something other than XMP – but then again, you can’t really have ‘tuned for AMD XMP’ profiles with XMP, so I get it – and it beats memory module producers having their own ‘tuned for AMD’ lines, though that was / is certainly better than nothing.

  2. Didn’t they already have an XMP clone? DOCP or some such? Maybe AMP? Now RAMP?

    Why can’t AMD keep on message?

  3. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 46873, member: 96″]
    Didn’t they already have an XMP clone? DOCP or some such? Maybe AMP? Now RAMP?

    Why can’t AMD keep on message?
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah I thought D.O.C.P. was their version of XMP?

  4. [QUOTE=”DrezKill, post: 46897, member: 230″]
    Yeah I thought D.O.C.P. was their version of XMP?
    [/QUOTE]
    Sounds right

  5. I think the issue with DOCP is that it is the function in AMD [I]motherboards[/I] to use Intel XMP profiles – but RAMP is meant to be a separate profile from XMP on the memory modules themselves.

  6. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 46912, member: 1367″]
    I think the issue with DOCP is that it is the function in AMD [I]motherboards[/I] to use Intel XMP profiles – but RAMP is meant to be a separate profile from XMP on the memory modules themselves.
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s quite possibly even worse.

  7. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 46924, member: 96″]
    That’s quite possibly even worse.
    [/QUOTE]
    I’ll keep it at ‘it depends’ – given how challenging memory tuning can be with AMD CPUs, and how [I]generally[/I] foolproof XMP is for Intel CPUs, I’d welcome an opportunity for memory that’s pushing the limits to ship with profiles for both.

    There’s also the chance for this to go horribly wrong 😀

  8. Well, the profile exists on the memory module – there’s no way the manufacturer of the memory module will know anything about the specific memory controller in your CPU – that goes for Intel and AMD. XMP/RAMP/whatever we are calling it today — that should just be what the modules on the DIMM can run at – at least beyond what the stock JEDEC values are for the stick.

    But if we start to have competing profiles, idk. I can’t see how they account for memory controller variations or specific motherboard layouts/erratta.

  9. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 46926, member: 96″]
    But if we start to have competing profiles, idk. I can’t see how they account for memory controller variations or specific motherboard layouts/erratta.
    [/QUOTE]
    Shouldn’t be competing, just different – modules already come with several JEDEC profiles in addition to XMP, so I don’t see the harm in adding AMD-specific profiles next to the Intel-specific XMP profile.

    For specific motherboards, you have QVLs if you’re really trying to ensure compatibility. I have my reservations with those but they do exist for exactly this purpose.

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