Image: Blu-ray Disc Association

Intel’s 11th and 12th Gen Core processors do not support playback of Ultra HD Blu-ray disks.

This is all thanks to the deprecation of Intel’s Software Guard Extensions (SGX) technology, a feature that allows content protected by DRM on Ultra HD Blu-ray movie discs to play on Windows systems. The lack of SGX support on 11th Gen and 12th Gen Core processors can be confirmed via Intel’s official data sheets, which list SGX among a handful of other technologies that are no longer supported.

Deprecated Technologies

  • Intel Memory Protection Extensions (Intel MPX)
  • Branch Monitoring Counters
  • Hardware Lock Elision (HLE), part of Intel TSX-NI
  • Intel Software Guard Extensions (Intel SGX)
  • Intel TSX-NI
  • Power Aware Interrupt Routing (PAIR)

CyberLink, the company behind popular software players such as PowerDVD, has highlighted the issue through a support document that confirmed Ultra HD Blu-rays can’t be played with the latest Intel chips. Users have been told to stick with older-generation Core processors, going so far as to avoid OS and firmware updates.

“The removal of the SGX feature, and its compatibility with the latest Windows OS and drivers, has caused a substantial challenge for CyberLink to continue supporting Ultra HD Blu-ray movie playback in our player software,” the company explained. “So much so, that it has been determined that it is no longer feasible for CyberLink to support the Ultra HD Blu-ray playback on newer CPUs and the latest Windows platforms.”

“For users who use an older compatible platform and want to keep the Ultra HD Blu-ray playback compatibility on the PC and with PowerDVD, we suggest you continue using the 7th – 10th generation Core i series of Intel CPUs and motherboards that support the Intel SGX feature. You should also consider not updating the OS (e.g., upgrading to Windows 11) and related Intel drivers to the latest versions in order to keep the Intel SGX feature from being removed from your PC.”

Intel abandoned its SGX technology due to the increasing amount of vulnerabilities and attack methods that have been discovered over the years, suspects Bleeping Computer. They include Foreshadow and SGAxe, two speculative-execution attacks that could be used to breach SGX.

Source: Intel (via CyberLink, Bleeping Computer)

Join the Conversation

14 Comments

  1. AMD doesn’t have this issue….. I have a X58 Xeon box around too if need be. Although I couldn’t tell you the last time I watched a blue ray on the PC. Or watched a Blue Ray period. I stream everything from online or Plex.

    My Blue Ray drives were for ripping, not watching primarily.

  2. Now Cyberlink finally addresses this in quite a pathetic way. How about develop a REAL solution so that this works on ALL modern CPU’s and operating systems. I discovered this the hard way several months ago when I built mine and my youngest brother’s computers. Both machines have an Intel 11700K. I spent more than $140 for each drive and $30 for the Cyberlink software for each machine. He wanted to watch his 4K discs on the television in his bedroom, so I went with the 11700K instead of the 5800X thinking it would work like the 10700K’s for 4K Blu ray. I get all the way out to Arizona just to discover that the recent Intel CPU’s do not support 4K Blu ray. I was quite ticked-off about the entire thing. I could had saved money by reusing the LG Blu ray drive from his old machine and gone with a better CPU. I uninstalled the Cyberlink software from both machines in disgust. I am still very bitter about this and the lack of any REAL support.

  3. I don’t see how this is cyberlink’s fault.

    Fool A creates invasive DRM that needs to be on the lowest level eg: the CPU, because DRM is king.
    Fool B implements said DRM, but later decides it’s no longer convenient for them to maintain so they remove it because F Fool D.
    Fool C is left shouldering the blame because they thought they can rely on Fool B not to remove important DRM features
    Fool D is left holding plastic discs that are only good as fancy coasters now.

    I’ll let you figure out who is who from these fools.

  4. My PC does have a blu-ray drive, but it doesn’t support Ultra HD blu-rays. Even if it did, I’d be fine with my old-ass Haswell-E CPU. My main blu-ray player is my PS3, and I also have a PS4 Pro and base XB1 to cover that too. So none of my blu-ray capable devices support Ultra HD blu-rays (nor do I own any displays that can take advantage of them). I don’t really use discs for movies anyways, I always use blu-ray rips.

    Kinda sh1tty that if you have a Rocket Lake or Alder Lake system you get boned, though.

  5. [QUOTE=”LeRoy_Blanchard, post: 46900, member: 137″]
    …and they wonder why people go through less than legal paths to get the stuff they want.
    [/QUOTE]

    If there is enough demand, a solution will always present itself.

  6. I suppose there are people who like to play UHD discs on their PC’s, I’ve just never met one.

    First off, a huge middle finger to Cyberlink in general. PowerDVD has always been a terrible product that they charge money for, to provide a service that should be free if you have the hardware. There has to be a software workaround for this, but that would require dev time and money and Cyberlink has never given a rats ass about improving the quality of its product. They should offer refunds to anyone who actually went out of their way to do this, but they won’t.

    I think Intel could leave extensions like these as optional to turn on or off, with a vulnerability disclaimer. Assuming that is possible.

    All that being said, this affects me zero percent… the few UHD discs I do have get played on my TV with a PS5, not a PC. I’m trying to remember the last time I played a physical disc movie of ANY kind off a PC and that’s probably the last HTPC rig I had, back in like 2003.

    The thought that popped into my head when I first read this was laptop users… but then realized I haven’t seen a laptop with an optical drive sold in the last decade+.

  7. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 46904, member: 96″]
    Does this also prevent ripping?
    [/QUOTE]

    Excellent question. How many of us are doing physical UHD ripping though? It’s a pain and expensive. I don’t believe this applies to regular BR.

  8. Between Intel, Microsoft, and HDCP certification, it’s amazing when you can legally play physical media on a PC these days, and yet there are still some clueless idiots who don’t understand why ripping and privacy are still of such significance. I don’t feel sorry for Cyberpower though, their prices have equaled or surpassed buying a standalone player for over a decade now. I don’t know what licensing fees they are paying but it sure seems like greed on the outside considering whatever hardware costs manufacturers are paying for the standalone players.

  9. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 46904, member: 96″]
    Does this also prevent ripping?
    [/QUOTE]
    Doubt it. If you can force a driver there’s usually a way. I am not endorsing anything illegal, just sayin’

  10. I don’t want to seem like I’m on a tirade with this but the facts are we still need physical media for a definitive release of things. I started to cave in the other day because I’ve streamed so much over the last year and then put in a disc in the older player. Immediately I was reminded of all the video/audio compression tricks used for steaming. It’s also a shame because back when 1080p blu-rays came out PC was nearly always superior if you had the most up-to-date hardware. Now that is no longer a choice, PC users are all but locked out of the best HT experience.

  11. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 46902, member: 297″]
    I suppose there are people who like to play UHD discs on their PC’s, I’ve just never met one.

    First off, a huge middle finger to Cyberlink in general. PowerDVD has always been a terrible product that they charge money for, to provide a service that should be free if you have the hardware. There has to be a software workaround for this, but that would require dev time and money and Cyberlink has never given a rats *** about improving the quality of its product. They should offer refunds to anyone who actually went out of their way to do this, but they won’t.

    I think Intel could leave extensions like these as optional to turn on or off, with a vulnerability disclaimer. Assuming that is possible.

    All that being said, this affects me zero percent… the few UHD discs I do have get played on my TV with a PS5, not a PC. I’m trying to remember the last time I played a physical disc movie of ANY kind off a PC and that’s probably the last HTPC rig I had, back in like 2003.

    The thought that popped into my head when I first read this was laptop users… but then realized I haven’t seen a laptop with an optical drive sold in the last decade+.
    [/QUOTE]

    I got a free version of powerDVD I got with something ages ago, still works even though it’s probably 3 OS’ later but it predates Blu-ray but got consoles for that.

    Tried VLC a couple times but can’t get that to play Blu-rays either.

Leave a comment