Image: GIGABYTE

GIGABYTE has launched an exchange and refund program for its Z690I AORUS ULTRA motherboards for 12th Gen Intel Core processors after discovering that they may not play well with certain graphics cards that are connected and being run under the usual speed settings. A press release shared by the manufacturer suggests that these motherboards may result in system instability when select GPUs are running in PCIe Gen 4 mode, something that doesn’t happen when the speeds are reduced to PCIe 3.0 via the BIOS. Z690I AORUS ULTRA DDR4 and Z690I AORUS ULTRA DDR5 owners who purchased their motherboards from non-third-party retailers and are affected may submit a claim at GIGABYTE’s program website, which can be accessed here.

While investigating reports of customers experiencing issues with their Z690I AORUS ULTRA, we discovered that there are certain cases of system instability and WHEA PCIe errors when paired with some PCIe Gen4 graphics cards. Setting the PCIe speed to Gen3 through the BIOS will eliminate these symptoms.

To address Z690I AORUS ULTRA owners who are currently experiencing instability issues as detailed above, GIGABYTE is offering a special program to upgrade users to the Z690I AORUS ULTRA PLUS motherboard or equivalent models, or users will also be eligible to apply for a refund. https://www.gigabyte.com/Press/News/1990

The special program will be applicable for all customers who have purchased the “Z690I AORUS ULTRA DDR4” or “Z690I AORUS ULTRA DDR5” motherboard from non-third-party retailers. Users who have just started or already completed their RMA process will also qualify. Please note program details may differ according to region.

From May 10, 2022 through November 30, 2022, GIGABYTE customers will be able to register for the program by submitting a claim on the website link below. Users will need to provide their general information, the motherboard’s serial number, and proof of purchase.

Source: GIGABYTE

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9 comments

  1. Good to see they are stepping up and doing the right thing. Was always a big Gigabyte fan, but this and my own hardware issues with them had me go in a different direction.
  2. Gigabyte when I started in pc building was basically the only game in town for dual bios motherboards and boards with solid hardware. I guess it's the ebb and flow of hardware.
  3. Gigabyte when I started in pc building was basically the only game in town for dual bios motherboards and boards with solid hardware. I guess it's the ebb and flow of hardware.
    There is no point in history where that was true. GIGABYTE heavily marketed dual BIOS ROMs as a thing, but it wasn't the only company to offer it and the need for it was definitely overstated. Plus, at the time you are probably referring to, GIGABYTE hardware was dragged down by its abysmal firmware.
  4. There is no point in history where that was true. GIGABYTE heavily marketed dual BIOS ROMs as a thing, but it wasn't the only company to offer it and the need for it was definitely overstated. Plus, at the time you are probably referring to, GIGABYTE hardware was dragged down by its abysmal firmware.
    I should have said I recall. Lol. Gigabyte had good hardware but not great bios. Then again at the time bios updates were much slower. Thete was no vendor application to manage hardware at least on what I could buy some 25 years ago.
  5. I should have said I recall. Lol. Gigabyte had good hardware but not great bios. Then again at the time bios updates were much slower. Thete was no vendor application to manage hardware at least on what I could buy some 25 years ago.
    I have a Gigabyte Z390 and a B550 board that are both - well, good. Hardware and BIOS are solid. But Z690...

    What is up with the Z690's having problems? The ASUS Rog Hero z690 had an issue a few months ago as well where their MOSFITS were burning out.
    That was a clear fluke. A high-profile one to be sure, but not one that you'd expect to happen, and also not one that you'd expect to happen again.

    Less talked about is their early-batch Apex Q/C problem, which amounts to quite the mess for the folks that have tried to use them.

    Overall, I don't think any manufacturer has come out of Z690 'clean'. MSI is probably the closest, but the shear number of new technologies being introduced or revised between Alder Lake and DDR5 has been a real challenge.

    On the other hand, I've been able to get my G.Skill 5600 C36 kit with Samsung ICs running at 6200 C36 - and this on a four-slot MSI board. Tons of voltage and extra cooling are involved, of course, but it's been running well for a few weeks now across my personal workloads.

    I think we're seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.
  6. What is up with the Z690's having problems? The ASUS Rog Hero z690 had an issue a few months ago as well where their MOSFITS were burning out.
    I've had very little problems with my Z690's besides a possible memory/board issue with a Aorus Z690 Master. Now I have used an Aorus Z690 Elite DDR4 board and now an MSI Edge Z690 board and both have been rock solid boards with memory and slight overclocking, though the Aorus board felt cheap even though it wasn't a budget board. I may give DDR5 another try at some point, but it will probably be with Rocket Lake if I do.
  7. I have the DDR4 version of this board. It kept randomly dropping audio for about 1 second using HDMI on a 6600XT, but seems fine with a 1080. I guess I'll be getting a new board from Gigabyte.
  8. Gigabyte came through with the new "Plus" board and it's working like a dream. I filled out the form and got an RMA the next day. Took about 10 days once I sent in the defective board to get the new one.

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