Image: The Verge

Anyone thinking about using Apple’s self service repair for their iPhone Mini may want to examine their options more carefully, as The Verge’s Sean Hollister was shipped a 79-pound repair kit to fix his phone’s 1.1-ounce battery after reaching out to the company. Additionally, while Apple only charges $69 to replace the battery, the cost for self service repair can run over $1,300 due to rental authorization charges. The 79-pound kit includes tools, a repair manual, an industrial heat press, and the relevant replacement parts. Note the phone at the bottom of the second image for size comparison. Hollister even needed to contact Apple to validate the new battery via Wi-Fi and remote access.

Image: The Verge
Image: The Verge

The thing you should understand about Apple’s home repair process is that it’s a far cry from traditional DIY if you opt for the kit — which I did, once I saw the repair manual only contains instructions for Apple’s own tools. (You can just buy a battery if you want.)

I expected Apple would send me a small box of screwdrivers, spudgers, and pliers; I own a mini iPhone, after all. Instead, I found two giant Pelican cases — 79 pounds of tools — on my front porch. I couldn’t believe just how big and heavy they were considering Apple’s paying to ship them both ways.

Source: The Verge

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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

12 comments

  1. Wow, that's.. I'm speechless.

    I mean, I know Apple's products don't follow traditional Design for Serviceability guidelines, but this is just ridiculous.

    Are they trying to make some sort of foolish point?
  2. Wow, that's.. I'm speechless.

    I mean, I know Apple's products don't follow traditional Design for Serviceability guidelines, but this is just ridiculous.

    Are they trying to make some sort of foolish point?
    Yep. Basically like a middle finger to anyone who bothers to contact them. If they can't block by legal means there are always other deterrents.
  3. I don’t know - I know to remove a specific bolt on one of our pieces of equipment it requires a 5,000 psi hydraulic press and very specific rig.

    Phones aren’t made to be easily disassembled, and if it takes a 69 lb rig to do it right, that’s what it takes. Not justifying the manufacturing and design choices, but who cares what the tool weighs?
  4. I don’t know - I know to remove a specific bolt on one of our pieces of equipment it requires a 5,000 psi hydraulic press and very specific rig.

    Phones aren’t made to be easily disassembled, and if it takes a 69 lb rig to do it right, that’s what it takes. Not justifying the manufacturing and design choices, but who cares what the tool weighs?
    I kind of agree here unless they ship it to you for one use and require you ship it back...
  5. Do they refund the $1200 after shipping it back? In that case who cares how much it weighs?

    But it seems to me that this is some ridiculous anti right to repair stunt from apple and they wouldn't do this for any old user.
  6. Do they refund the $1200 after shipping it back? In that case who cares how much it weighs?

    But it seems to me that this is some ridiculous anti right to repair stunt from apple and they wouldn't do this for any old user.
    My understanding from reading the article is that the charge is a "hold on the credit card" so basically yes. You still have to pay the other charges and ironically enough that ends up being almost double vs just having them do it. Not to mention all the time you're out to do this as well.
  7. the article is written from the point of view of a typical consumer. what im more interested in is the point of view of repair shops that do this everyday.
    I believe authorized repair shops have a machine like this - it's fairly massive and intimidating-looking


    Has the equipment to bond the glass/touchscreen and other stuff. Also need to break down the glue and crap they use to stick all this together.

    This is from about 5 years ago, and I don't think the process to open up an already-manufacturer phone has become any less complicated. So yeah, it's been a lot more than just a screwdriver, at least for Apple, for quite some time now.
  8. the article is written from the point of view of a typical consumer. what im more interested in is the point of view of repair shops that do this everyday.
    I get that. I've had a number of friends in different ma' and pa' shops over the years with usually less than 8 employees so I've truly seen what it can be like when you don't have corporate financing to support all the tasks. My wife used to work as a cashier in one.
  9. I believe authorized repair shops have a machine like this - it's fairly massive and intimidating-looking


    Has the equipment to bond the glass/touchscreen and other stuff. Also need to break down the glue and crap they use to stick all this together.

    This is from about 5 years ago, and I don't think the process to open up an already-manufacturer phone has become any less complicated. So yeah, it's been a lot more than just a screwdriver, at least for Apple, for quite some time now.
    Thanks for posting!
  10. on a totally side but similar note. I grew up in the era when local mechanics had to use their wits and not technology for diagnostics and repairs. From pre-OBD on through the current gens we've seen a lot. I still remember the old days when shops either had to buy an entirely new computer or at least a new card for each different model when the sensor invasions began, and you can imagine the costs. I also remember how the early BT OBD II dongles would get you by requiring additional software add-on purchases for each model. Glad to say that has changed, at least for things that are not totally new. These days most folks don't know how lucky they are to be able to find something on the web that just works and costs under $60 to do what is needed.

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