Image: AMD

AMD has shared a new blog post that can confirm its Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5000 WX-Series processors are now available in Dell Precision 7865 workstations and will also be available at leading system integrators worldwide beginning in July 2022. The latest family of Threadripper PRO chips comprises three SKUs, including the RYZEN Threadripper PRO 5995WX, a flagship processor that features 64 cores, 128 threads, frequencies of up to 4.5 GHz, and a TDP of 280 watts. AMD originally announced its new Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5000 WX-Series processors in March, explaining how they leverage the Zen 3 core architecture to deliver “dominant, full-spectrum performance leadership across multiple workstation workloads” for industries that include visual effects for film. They were first made available through Lenovo’s ThinkStation P620 and will launch for the DIY community later this year.

Product Specifications

AMD RYZEN THREADRIPPER PRO
5000 SERIES CHANNEL SKUs
CORES/THREADSFREQUENCY (BOOST/BASE)TDP
AMD RYZEN THREADRIPPER PRO
5995WX
64 / 128UP TO 4.5 / 2.7 GHz 280W 
AMD RYZEN THREADRIPPER PRO
5975WX
32 / 64UP TO 4.5 / 3.6 GHz280W
AMD RYZEN THREADRIPPER PRO
5965WX
24 / 48UP TO 4.5 / 3.8 GHz280W

Threadripper processors have always been a platform that is defined by leadership performance and capability which enables unlimited creative potential. Examining what our most demanding enthusiasts and content creators value most in the platform has led us to unify the Threadripper and Threadripper PRO product lines. Going forward, the Threadripper platform will now use a single “common infrastructure.” This means there will be one set of Threadripper PRO processors to choose from, with one CPU socket and chipset, and every processor will be based on AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO silicon. This also means that all Threadripper processors will natively offer: 128 lanes of PCIe Gen 4, 8-channel UDIMM and RDIMM support for more flexible memory configurations, massive L3 cache, plus the benefit of security and manageability features common across the Ryzen PRO processor family. Impressive hardware specs like these are a large part of why Threadripper processors are trusted for enthusiasts and professional creators.

Source: AMD

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15 comments

  1. Even though I understand why AMD might be slow to introduce Threadripper upgrades - it's still a bit disappointing.

    Hard to get both top-end single-core performance, a lot of said cores, and the PCIe connectivity to put them to work in a single socket.
  2. Honestly I'm still glad to see these coming down. I have a boss with a 2000 series AMD Threadripper CPU. 12 core. As long as the motherboard is compatible I am going to recommend he watch for these. :)
  3. Honestly I'm still glad to see these coming down. I have a boss with a 2000 series AMD Threadripper CPU. 12 core. As long as the motherboard is compatible I am going to recommend he watch for these. :)
    I thought PRO threadripper used a different socket?
  4. I thought PRO threadripper used a different socket?
    Oh crap really? Lets see what Google says.

    Well that blows. the 2000 series was the last to use the base TR4 Socket. :( Bummer.
  5. Yeah. Honestly I am absolutely baffled by it.

    Yeah, one of the reasons I justified spending stupid money on this platform was because AMD committed to long term support for the platform at release. I figured I'd at least get one drop in generation upgrade out of it.

    Since they appear to have skipped Zen3, and Zen4 is moving to DDR5, with all likelihood this means this platform will be a one and done.

    It is very disappointing.

    That, and I don't know where I go from here. The basic consumer models just don't have sufficient PCIe lanes for me, and the Threadripper PRO models are priced at an absolutely insane level for a home user.

    As much as it pains me, I may actually have to look towards Intel's new (rumored? not sure if confirmed) HEDT models based on Sapphire Rapids / Raptor Lake. Either that, or just maintain separate platforms, keep the current Threadripper for the productivity/work stuff I do, and build a dedicated consumer grade machine around Zen4 for games, but that feels so wasteful.

    One of the selling points of PC gaming has been that it is an all in one machine I do everything on. Hvaing a dedicated gaming box just feels so utterly stupid, expecially considering how little time I actually got to spend playing games.
  6. TBH, Threadripper always just seemed more like a marketing stunt or some engineer's side project to me. I really like it, don't get me wrong, but it is such a small niche of users and cannibalizes from their higher margin sales. Can't say I'm surprised they have shifted it all over to Pro/Epyc, but it was neat while it lasted.
  7. My guess is that threadripper got cut because AMD is selling everything they produce at this time. In a scenario like they, they might as well sell everything Epyc like as either Epyc or threadripper pro.

    If that sales dynamic changes, they might reintroduce threadripper for people that won’t pay pro prices, but will buy something “better” than a x950 model.
  8. If you've been watching vendor sites over the past few years the presence of AMD EPYC CPU based systems has gone from hard to find... to listed beside the intel systems. This means that AMD's ability to deliver EPYC CPU's has much improved.
  9. My guess is that threadripper got cut because AMD is selling everything they produce at this time. In a scenario like they, they might as well sell everything Epyc like as either Epyc or threadripper pro.

    If that sales dynamic changes, they might reintroduce threadripper for people that won’t pay pro prices, but will buy something “better” than a x950 model.

    I understand the business dynamics, but the promise was that it would se long term support, and that promise has been broken.

    At the time I was shopping I read articles like this one:


    AMD commits to 'long-term' support for sTRX4 CPU socket used with third-gen Threadripper

    You will need a new TRX40 mobo, but will not have to change out for a while

    Bottom line: With third generation Threadripper processors set to arrive later this month, AMD has vowed to provide long-term support for the new sTRX4 socket. This is a good thing because the high-bandwidth sockets are not cross-compatible with previous generation sTR4 motherboards that were used for the first- and second-generation Threadrippers.

    Without proclamations like the above, I would have no reason to be pissed. There are never any guarantees with these things, but they literally trold us there would be long term support for the platform, and then they proceeded to neglect it, and now its all but dead.

    If they can massage the TRX40 chipset and motherboards into working with DDR5 with a BIOS update, maybe I'll take this back, but that usually isn't possible, and thus I am mighty disappointed in AMD for breaking promises and screwing over its top end non-enterprise customers.
  10. Well, even in what you quote: they still say you would need a new motherboard, they were just committed to using the socket

    They were talking about a new motherboard for the Threadripper 3xxx series. So, what I have now.

    The Threadripper 1xxx and 2xxx series used a different motherboard.

    This article was published in 2019 right before the 3xxx series launched.

    So, buy a new motherboard for the 3xxx series (which I did) and then you'll be set for a while with long term support.
  11. They were talking about a new motherboard for the Threadripper 3xxx series. So, what I have now.

    The Threadripper 1xxx and 2xxx series used a different motherboard.

    This article was published in 2019 right before the 3xxx series launched.

    So, buy a new motherboard for the 3xxx series (which I did) and then you'll be set for a while with long term support.
    Ah thanks, I misunderstood

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