Image: 20th Century Studios

Avatar trolls and other critics of the multi-billion grossing blockbuster love to say that the movie has made little cultural impact despite its massive success at the box office and how many can’t even remember the characters’ names, but James Cameron isn’t having any of that. Speaking in a recent interview for Empire’s upcoming world-exclusive Avatar: The Way of Water issue, the legendary director behind Aliens and The Terminator hit back at haters, telling the publication that “nobody gives a sh*t” about their criticism because at the end of the day, most of them will rewatch the movie and “shut the f*ck up” after reacquainting themselves with Pandora and realizing how wrong they are. Cameron goes on to say that he doesn’t want to hear anyone complain about Avatar: The Way of Water’s three-hour runtime, as people have grown accustomed to binge-watching entire seasons of shows in one sitting thanks to the release habits of popular streamers. Avatar: The Way of Water is set for release on December 16, 2022, although it remains unclear whether it’ll be able to beat (or even come close to) the original 2009 film at the box office.

“The trolls will have it that nobody gives a shit and they can’t remember the characters’ names or one damn thing that happened in the movie,” Cameron said. “Then they see the movie again and go, ‘Oh, okay, excuse me, let me just shut the fuck up right now.’ So I’m not worried about that.”

“I don’t want anybody whining about length when they sit and binge-watch [television] for eight hours,” the director added. “I can almost write this part of the review. ‘The agonisingly long three-hour movie…’ It’s like, give me a fucking break. I’ve watched my kids sit and do five one-hour episodes in a row. Here’s the big social paradigm shift that has to happen: it’s okay to get up and go pee.” 

It’s inevitable – whenever somebody or something encounters gigantic levels of success, it always begets some kind of backlash. And so while James Cameron’s Avatar became the biggest box-office smash of all time back in 2009 – ringing up box office receipts to the tune of $2.84 billion and counting, overtaking Avengers: Endgame after a 2021 re-release in China, and set to add to that total when it returns to cinemas here in September – there are plenty of people out there who love to pour scorn on the sci-fi epic, questioning its staying power, relevancy, and quality, as well as the desire for Cameron’s upcoming quartet of sequels. But there’s a reason the first Avatar made that much money in the first place – and the filmmaker himself really isn’t worried about what certain quarters of the internet may say about it.

Source: Empire

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26 comments

  1. Avatar trolls and other critics of the multi-billion grossing blockbuster love to say that the movie has made little cultural impact despite its massive success at the box office and how many can't even remember the characters' names, but James Cameron isn't having any of that.

    Go to post
    It's funny, despite grossing as much as it did I don't think it really had any lasting cultural impact. I've never heard anyone quoting things from the movie, nor does anyone remember the names of any of the characters. It's kind of like the Abyss. Many people liked it, but few remember much about the movie.
  2. It's funny, despite grossing as much as it did I don't think it really had any lasting cultural impact. I've never heard anyone quoting things from the movie, nor does anyone remember the names of any of the characters. It's kind of like the Abyss. Many people liked it, but few remember much about the movie.
    Avatar was an experience more than it was a movie with special roles. It was so cutting edge that it is taken as a whole rather than individual roles. I would call it successful in that regard.
  3. I had to go look up when the movie came out, in 2009. I remember that I missed it and a couple of years later a family member mentioned they finally saw it and that it was ok. I know I didn't see it until maybe 2014-15 a few years after that family member told me about it. Its Dances with Wolves in Space with neat special effects.
  4. I didn't like the character designs, I didn't like the space Pocahontas plagiarisation, I didn't like the cgi, and I wasn't on board with the 3D fad. There was nothing about Avatar that made me want to watch it. So I didn't. Therefore there is even less of a chance that I'll watch this.

    It was so cutting edge that it is taken as a whole rather than individual roles.
    What does that mean? What movie do you take in bits instead of a whole?
  5. This kind of social engagement always works in their favor! Insult customers then profit! :rolleyes:
    And we are the fools that we still pay for the crap that:

    1. They made for themselves, not us
    2. They didn't research at all if it is an existing universe
    3. Even if they know something about it, they deliberately want to change it
    4. They want to use as a platform for their politics
    These are the type of people hollywood is hiring nowadays to write and direct the reboots and sequels for long standing entertainment franhcises.

    When everyone is doing it, even industry veterans start to, so they don't get expelled from the bubble.
  6. He is just another hollywood fossil who thinks his farts smells like roses. I'm not going to re-watch avatar because I never watched it in the first place. Also comparing binge watching TV to sitting on your *** in a theater for 3+ hours shows how far out of touch with reality he is.
  7. Not happening.

    You have to watch it the first time to be able to "re-watch" it :p

    Avatar was a cool tech demo of what was possible with computer rendered special effects in 2009.

    Just about everything else about it from what I have read was mediocre to bad, to the point were I wasn't even willing to watch it.

    Transplanted Dances With Wolves or Pocahontas into a blue-skinned space setting.

    The difference is that Dances with Wolves was actually a good film.

    I don't understand how it was so financially successful. Who were all these people who watched it anyway? I don't recall any of my friends buzzing about it or running out to the theaters to watch it the first time around, and I'm not hearing anyone buzzing about these sequels either.

    Were there regional differences maybe? Age group differences? Maybe it was super popular among people younger than me, or in other parts of the country than where I live? To me, the original launch of Avatar in 2009 went by almost unnoticed.
  8. It's funny, despite grossing as much as it did I don't think it really had any lasting cultural impact. I've never heard anyone quoting things from the movie, nor does anyone remember the names of any of the characters. It's kind of like the Abyss. Many people liked it, but few remember much about the movie.

    I remember exactly one line from the Abyss. "So raise your hand if you think that was a Russian water tentacle".

    That's it. I barely even remember the story. I do recall thinking the film was pretty good, but it didn't exactly "stick".

    But that's more or less Cameron's career in a nutshell isn't it.

    Terminator 2 is probably the onle exception. That film had some cultural impact and people remember it. Everything else mostly has that "summer action movie" feel. A cheap quick thrill that is soon forgotten.
  9. And we are the fools that we still pay for the crap that:
    1. They made for themselves, not us
    2. They didn't research at all if it is an existing universe
    3. Even if they know something about it, they deliberately want to change it
    4. They want to use as a platform for their politics
    These are the type of people hollywood is hiring nowadays to write and direct the reboots and sequels for long standing entertainment franhcises.

    When everyone is doing it, even industry veterans start to, so they don't get expelled from the bubble.
    Understood, but you'll notice a massive drop off in profits. For example, Infinity War and Endgame brought in a whole lot more than say Eternals. And I suspect a lot of them seeing movies with points 1,2,3, and 4 have children. Maybe a lot of children. :p
  10. I remember exactly one line from the Abyss. "So raise your hand if you think that was a Russian water tentacle".

    That's it. I barely even remember the story. I do recall thinking the film was pretty good, but it didn't exactly "stick".

    But that's more or less Cameron's career in a nutshell isn't it.

    Terminator 2 is probably the onle exception. That film had some cultural impact and people remember it. Everything else mostly has that "summer action movie" feel. A cheap quick thrill that is soon forgotten.
    Not really. Or rather, I think its fair to say that it's his career post-Avatar in a nutshell.

    Pre-Titanic he directed the following memorable films:
    • The Terminator
    • Aliens
    • Terminator 2: Judgement Day
    • True Lies
    Love it or hate it, Titanic is memorable as well. Avatar onward, not so much.
  11. This.


    Same.
    As I remember everybody was raving about it, it was the talk of the town and there were only two kinds of people at my work: The ones who saw it, and the ones who wanted to see it. Except of course for me.

    It was like a virus that infected everyone and made them watch it.

    But nobody could point to anything about it why it was so good, it seems to me that they only said it was great because everybody else said it was great. So it might have been the greatest lie in history where people just pretended to like it, to not be excluded from the "cool club".

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