Image: Apple

Apple Music has debuted Apple Music Sessions which is offering exclusive live music streamed in the spatial audio format. The new series launched with performances from Carrie Underwood and Tenille Townes recorded live at its new studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Today, Apple Music is premiering Apple Music Sessions, exclusive live releases featuring some of the world’s most prolific artists and emerging artists, all in Spatial Audio. Recorded out of Apple Music’s studios around the world, Apple Music Sessions gives artists the opportunity to reimagine and recreate hits from their catalog, and creative covers of beloved classics. These unique performances are also filmed, resulting in a special, bespoke live collection comprised of brand-new Spatial Audio tracks and companion live performance music videos that will all be available exclusively to Apple Music fans worldwide.

Apple Music Sessions officially launches today with releases from Carrie Underwood and Tenille Townes, recorded out of Apple Music’s new state-of-the-art studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

Image: Apple

During her performance, Carrie Underwood played some of her hits but then branched out with a cover of Ozzy Osbourne’s “Mama, I’m Coming Home” from his 1991 album “No More Tears“.

“I have always been an Ozzy Osbourne fan and ‘Mama, I’m Coming Home’ is one of my all-time favorite songs,” Underwood continued. “I’ve always thought it felt a lot like a country song, and I’ve wanted to cover it for a long time. This was a really fun opportunity for me to be able to finally make that happen. I hope we’ve done Ozzy proud and I hope he likes it.”  

Image: Apple

Country singer-songwriter Tenille Townes shared that she and her band were honored to be a part of the inaugural series debut.

“It was so cool capturing the spirit of how it feels to play my songs live with my band during the Apple Music Sessions performance,” Townes said. “The new space feels like it’s going to become an anchor for our music community in Nashville, and it was an honor to be a part of breaking it in.”

Apple has said that future performances will include Ronnie Dunn and Ingrid Andress but also plans to feature artists from other genres as well.

Apple loves music. Apple revolutionized the music experience with iPod and iTunes. Today, the award-winning Apple Music celebrates musicians, songwriters, producers, and fans with a catalog of over 90 million songs, expertly curated playlists, and the best artist interviews, conversations, and global premieres with Apple Music Radio. With original content from the most respected and beloved people in music, autoplay, time-synced lyrics, lossless audio, and immersive sound powered by Spatial Audio with Dolby Atmos, Apple Music offers the world’s best listening experience, helping listeners discover new music and enjoy their favorites while empowering the global artist community.

Source: Apple (via Engadget)

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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

6 comments

  1. I had a free Music trial for a bit and tried out Spatial.

    It was neat on my home theater, but not groundbreaking in my opinion, and there wasn't a ton of it to make use of. It did use Dolby Atmos if I recall correctly (playing back through an Apple TV 4K). Maybe it's more impactful if you have headphones on - but then you lose the entire body experience that you gain when sitting in front of good speakers....

    In the end, I didn't chose to keep the service. Even though I'm fairly invested in Apple hardware, it wasn't impactful enough to overcome the convenience of having Spotify on absolutely everything and everywhere.
  2. It was neat on my home theater, but not groundbreaking in my opinion, and there wasn't a ton of it to make use of.
    I collect a lot of Hi-res audio including some of the 5.1 24/96 remasters that come out for various things and even with a nice surround sound setup that can be an issue. I feel like there's a disconnect between the sound engineers and artists with the listeners. Those of us with the systems are not investing because we want to hear everything on a stage crammed onto the same two speakers and then the clapping of hands everywhere else. I've never understood why they don't make more use of the soundscape to spread out the other instruments to the other channels. I do hear it sometimes but often will just switch any receiver I have over to the all-channel stereo, which I know defeats the purpose, but at least lets the speakers handle the duty of reproducing the sound via what each can do.

    I don't have any Apple services so I won't be checking this out anytime soon but I'm glad they are at least giving it a shot. I've been waiting for some 4K live concerts with Atmos but so far none of the artists I like have put out anything and meanwhile, the last gen of DTS HD MA was a mixed bag. Great sample and bit rates but the mixes mostly seemed underwhelming.
  3. I do hear it sometimes but often will just switch any receiver I have over to the all-channel stereo, which I know defeats the purpose, but at least lets the speakers handle the duty of reproducing the sound via what each can do.
    I know it's cheating, but honestly, all-surround mode sounds more interesting sonically than most spatial audio tracks did.
  4. In the 90s, I figured by the time 2020 rolled around, stereo music would give way to multi-channel surround sound music. Well 90s me, you figured wrong.

    Anyone remember these?
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    I mostly missed the SACD train but have an extensive library of DVD-A from Led Zeppelin to Jethro Tull, Queen, and a few others that I can't remember off the top of my head. It's a great format. I love it, except for the unimaginative mixdowns but I use DVD Audio Ripper to rip them to 2-channel hi-res FLAC files for my tablet and receiver HDD. I do the same for any BD or DVD's that happen to have hi-res audio or at least 24-bit/48 KHz.

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