Image: Intel

Early benchmarks for some of Intel’s upcoming “Raptor Lake” processors continue to surface, and the results are lovely.

One benchmark involves an engineering sample of a 13th Gen Intel Core i9-13900K (8 P-Cores, 16 E-Cores) processor running in CPU-Z on an MSI PRO Z690-A motherboard coupled with 32 GB of DDR4-2666 memory. This chip managed to score 846 points and 13,054 points in the single-core and multi-threaded tests, respectively.

That’s a healthy increase of “12% versus the Core i9-12900K and a 10% increase over the AMD Ryzen 9 5950X,” according to comparisons drafted by Wccftech.

Image: Wccftech

The other benchmarks involve an engineering sample of a 13th Gen Intel Core i5-13600K (6 P-Cores, 8 E-Cores) processor paired with ASRock Z690 Steel Legend WiFi 6E (likely the DDR4 version) and ASUS ROG Maximus Z690 Extreme (DDR5) motherboards on Geekbench.

They show “up to 2,012 points in single-core and up to 16,054 points in multi-core tests,” which would make the new CPU “up to 97% faster than the Ryzen 5 5600X and up to 38% faster than the Core i5-12600K,” according to further comparisons shared by Wccftech.

Image: Wccftech

Even in single-core, the chip is faster than all of AMD’s Ryzen 5000 Zen 3 lineup, delivering a 25% uplift in single-threaded performance versus the Ryzen 5 5600X and an 8.5% improvement over its predecessor, the Core i5-12600K. The CPU comes close to the Ryzen 9 5950X in multi-core performance and beats the Core i7-12700K easily.

Intel is expected to launch its first 13th Gen Core “Raptor Lake” processors and premium Z790 platform in October. AMD’s Ryzen 7000 Series processors and all-new AM5 platform should also surface around the same time.

Source: CPU-Z, Geekbench (1, 2) (via Wccftech)

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17 comments

  1. Raptor Lake will be competing with Zen 4, not Zen 3. E cores don't interest me, but the single-thread gains look good. How many $ and how many watts, though?
  2. Raptor Lake will be competing with Zen 4, not Zen 3. E cores don't interest me, but the single-thread gains look good. How many $ and how many watts, though?
    Lets me honest overall we don't care about Watts. I know I'm putting words in your mouth but I don't think anyone that's an enthusiast does. If you're building an HTPC for your entertainment center different story but you're more worried about breathing and heat dissipation than power consumption unless you're tripping breakers.
  3. If you're building an HTPC for your entertainment center different story but you're more worried about breathing and heat dissipation than power consumption
    That all kinda goes hand in hand....

    I don't overly care about watts, but that isn't the same think as not caring at all. In a desktop, the difference between 65W and 125W isn't that much, but the difference between 65W and 225W is, and when you couple that with a powerful GPU you start running out of volume in your room to just get that heat out of there -- your room ambient temp will start creeping up on you. Similarly in a SFF, the difference between 15 and 35W isn't huge, but jump over 100W and you just run out of volume in your case to move that heat around effectively.

    So yeah, I care. But within bounds.
  4. Lets me honest overall we don't care about Watts. I know I'm putting words in your mouth but I don't think anyone that's an enthusiast does. If you're building an HTPC for your entertainment center different story but you're more worried about breathing and heat dissipation than power consumption unless you're tripping breakers.
    I take the limits off my 12700k and 3080 12GB FTW, and I can pull 850W+ at the wall during stress testing.

    Yes, I can and do tune it down for daily use - but we're getting to the point where circuits are close to getting overloaded.
  5. Lets me honest overall we don't care about Watts. I know I'm putting words in your mouth but I don't think anyone that's an enthusiast does. If you're building an HTPC for your entertainment center different story but you're more worried about breathing and heat dissipation than power consumption unless you're tripping breakers.
    I care, especially at idle and low utilization states. What I'm not overly concerned about is peak power usage (on a desktop), except to the extent that it demands exotic cooling solutions or imposes other undesirable build restrictions.
  6. I take the limits off my 12700k and 3080 12GB FTW, and I can pull 850W+ at the wall during stress testing.
    Right but that is during stress testing. Outside of the occasional stress test (for the non reviewers amongst us) when is power demand that great?

    Admittedly my UPS reports around 530 watts of power use when I am gaming... so much more and it could start to have issue.

    I suppose I'm in the minority with a power supply of higher efficiency rating. But as power draw creeps up having a 1200 watt 80+ gold or Bronze will be an issue compared to Titanium or Platinum. We will need the efficiency to run stable systems that CAN do sustained benchmarking as an example and not flip power breakers.
  7. Right but that is during stress testing. Outside of the occasional stress test (for the non reviewers amongst us) when is power demand that great?
    Main point is that, as you note afterward, it is poised to start becoming an issue - I gave my personal system as an example, and it isn't comprised of top-end parts. Next-gen top-end parts look to be able to gobble down even more power at the extremes.

    I suppose I'm in the minority with a power supply of higher efficiency rating. But as power draw creeps up having a 1200 watt 80+ gold or Bronze will be an issue compared to Titanium or Platinum. We will need the efficiency to run stable systems that CAN do sustained benchmarking as an example and not flip power breakers.
    I couldn't tell you what the efficiency of my current 1000W PSU is - it was purchased last year when affordable 1000W units of known quality were rarer and I simply needed the power output as 850W was just not enough!

    I also now consider 1000W to be the minimum for higher-end builds. I'm personally waiting until we get some 1300W+ units with the new 16-pin GPU connector.
  8. I couldn't tell you what the efficiency of my current 1000W PSU is - it was purchased last year when affordable 1000W units of known quality were rarer and I simply needed the power output as 850W was just not enough!

    I also now consider 1000W to be the minimum for higher-end builds. I'm personally waiting until we get some 1300W+ units with the new 16-pin GPU connector.
    It's worth looking...and on your next build I personally would recommend nothing less than platinum rated... I bought platinum this go around because I THOUGHT that was the top tier. If I had known titanium was an option I would have gone with that and paid the extra 50 bucks or so. Not that you can get one when I was looking. Platinum was the best I could find.
  9. It's worth looking...and on your next build I personally would recommend nothing less than platinum rated... I bought platinum this go around because I THOUGHT that was the top tier. If I had known titanium was an option I would have gone with that and paid the extra 50 bucks or so.
    Same here, but I did know about the Titanium and felt it was a bit overkill at the time. If I had to do it over I would have went with with the Titanium though.
  10. 10% faster than a 5950X???? Oh noes! What shall AMD do?!?!?

    Really. If it's only up to 10% faster than AMD's top tier CPU right now AMD doesn't have much to improve upon to best that. That's not a big lead. lol
  11. Really. If it's only up to 10% faster than AMD's top tier CPU right now AMD doesn't have much to improve upon to best that. That's not a big lead. lol
    That's with eight P cores and sixteen E cores - versus sixteen Zen 3 cores.
  12. That's with eight P cores and sixteen E cores - versus sixteen Zen 3 cores.
    Doesn't matter, since the two are not comparable in that sense. What is comparable is overall performance. And 10% is not a wide gap to bridge.
  13. That's with eight P cores and sixteen E cores - versus sixteen Zen 3 cores.

    Sure but what are they going to charge for the new 8core16t + 16ecore i5? At $300 its not too shabby compared to the 16 core's current (likely soon to be lower) $550. If the e-cores work with the programs you need the threads for.
  14. Doesn't matter, since the two are not comparable in that sense. What is comparable is overall performance. And 10% is not a wide gap to bridge.
    Agreed, and it really does depend on what you're comparing. Intel's P-cores are certainly stronger than Zen 3 cores, and also clock higher, so there's your single-thread advantage. But as we've seen with say the 5800X3D that is clocked lower than the standard 5800X, that matters less and less as time goes on, even for gaming.

    Sure but what are they going to charge for the new 8core16t + 16ecore i5? At $300 its not too shabby compared to the 16 core's current (likely soon to be lower) $550. If the e-cores work with the programs you need the threads for.
    The i5's will be pretty significantly cut down, and the i7's somewhat too. Price / performance comparisons will certainly be interesting - and I really don't know where the E-cores will move the needle. They do work and are fairly impressive on their own, almost as potent as Zen 2 cores.
  15. Clock speed isn't end all be all. As we've seen with Pentium 4 and Athlon64. A P4 at 4.0 Ghz was significantly slower than a A64 at 2.4. It's what can be done in that clock cycle that matters.
  16. Lets me honest overall we don't care about Watts. I know I'm putting words in your mouth but I don't think anyone that's an enthusiast does. If you're building an HTPC for your entertainment center different story but you're more worried about breathing and heat dissipation than power consumption unless you're tripping breakers.
    In my main system with dual 360mm radiators and a 1000W PSU I'm less concerned. The only Intel system I have right now is a mini ITX with a 12400, Thermalright AXP-90 X53, and 850W. The heatsink is rated for 150W. I know a 13900 is out of the question, but will I have the option of a 13600?
  17. The heatsink is rated for 150W. I know a 13900 is out of the question, but will I have the option of a 13600?
    Yes, though specifically how you limit the CPU to a particular wattage as opposed to having it thermally throttle will depend on the board. Most Z-series boards tend to be pretty good about setting a wattage target or wattage range, in my experience.

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