Image: TEAMGROUP

TEAMGROUP is taking M.2 SSD cooling up a notch with its latest solution for solid state drives.

Announced today, TEAMGROUP’s N74V-M80 is an M.2 SSD that features the industry’s first-ever vapor chamber cooler designed for high-performance industrial SSDs. It leverages liquid-cooling technology to remove heat and reduce temperatures, ensuring “outstanding thermal performance that can sustain high-speed operation in harsh and dynamic industrial environments.”

The specifics behind the vapor chamber’s design, per TEAMGROUP:

Through the specially designed VC liquid cooling tubes, cooling fluid is pumped to the heat zone of PCIe M.2 SSD controller. Heat is then transferred to the aluminum fin heat sink with a convective design via gas-liquid phase transition to enhance thermal performance. The N74V-M80 combines the functions of heat absorption, conduction, and dissipation to better transfer and regulate thermal energy. TEAMGROUP’s industrial control T.R.U.S.T. technology (“T” for Temperature) ensures that its PCIe M.2 SSD products maintain excellent transfer performance over a wide temperature range of -40°C (-40°F) to 85°C (185°F).

As for the SSD itself, TEAMGROUP can confirm that it uses TLC flash and “supports the PCIe Gen 3×4 interface and NVMe 1.3 standard, providing write and read speeds of up to 3,400 and 2,500 MB/s, respectively.

TEAMGROUP’s product page for the N74V-M80 includes a chart that demonstrates the benefits of its vapor chamber liquid-cooling technology, showing how M.2 SSDs equipped with the cooling module could see reduced read and write times by as much as 75%.

Vapor chambers may be found in premium laptops and smartphones, such as the ASUS ROG Phone 6. Microsoft’s Xbox Series X and Xbox One X consoles also feature vapor chambers for improved cooling.

Source: TEAMGROUP

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6 comments

  1. All of that and PCIE 3.x x 4. Really? Seems to be missing the boat.

    Enterprise products often care more about reliability than performance, and these are likely used to upgrade (or replace) drives in older hsrdware.

    Most enterprise stuff comes with all the drives installed from the vendor. It is pretty unusual to see custom builds in an enterprise setting. They usually just spec out the system on the Dell/HP website and click order, then install it into the rack as is once it arrives.
  2. Maybe I'm a poor IT Engineer but I would NEVER deploy an Teamgroup NVME drive into my environment. I don't even have servers with 'traditional' NVME ports. This drive has no DWPD metric at all listed on their specs page either.

    The enterprise use for this would be in a laptop and as it would be external to the existing cooling loops in laptops even that is a no.

    The drive is for "Industrial" markets though... so outdoors devices, high vibrations that sort of thing. Perhaps it has a use case there. But to the general consumer and enterprise buyer... Yea... no.
  3. This drive has no DWPD metric at all listed on their specs page either.
    From what little is shown, this strikes as a concept; I'd expect truly 'enterprise'-focused SKUs to follow.
    Maybe I'm a poor IT Engineer but I would NEVER deploy an Teamgroup NVME drive into my environment.
    In mine, we use HP servers, and we don't use AMD CPUs. And it's not that other groups / programs don't use other vendors, but that we've been on HP for two decades, and we'll probably be on HP until we're no longer operating on prem - and honestly be on Intel that long too. Whatever cost and performance difference there may be, well, it doesn't outweigh the figurative variable elimination by sticking with 'what's known'.

    All said though, while I'm somewhat skeptical of some of the less popular brands (and this coming from an NA perspective), I did branch out recently and try DDR4 memory kits from Patriot (Viper) and Team Group. Very different kits with very different goals, but both impressed.

    For enthusiast builds, I wouldn't count either out - and additionally, I tried an ADATA XPG DDR5 kit for my ill-fated Gigabyte Z690 board (returned to vendor), and didn't really know enough to give them a fair shake. Feel like I kind of owe them another run, for DDR5 at least.

    But I absolutely agree that enterprise environments are entirely a different matter.
  4. From what little is shown, this strikes as a concept; I'd expect truly 'enterprise'-focused SKUs to follow.

    In mine, we use HP servers, and we don't use AMD CPUs. And it's not that other groups / programs don't use other vendors, but that we've been on HP for two decades, and we'll probably be on HP until we're no longer operating on prem - and honestly be on Intel that long too. Whatever cost and performance difference there may be, well, it doesn't outweigh the figurative variable elimination by sticking with 'what's known'.

    All said though, while I'm somewhat skeptical of some of the less popular brands (and this coming from an NA perspective), I did branch out recently and try DDR4 memory kits from Patriot (Viper) and Team Group. Very different kits with very different goals, but both impressed.

    For enthusiast builds, I wouldn't count either out - and additionally, I tried an ADATA XPG DDR5 kit for my ill-fated Gigabyte Z690 board (returned to vendor), and didn't really know enough to give them a fair shake. Feel like I kind of owe them another run, for DDR5 at least.

    But I absolutely agree that enterprise environments are entirely a different matter.
    Yea I'm just not sure where this 'industrial' drive is supposed to fit in. You're like me and in the enterprise 'build your own' only exists on the order sheet.

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