Image: AMD

AMD has inadvertently confirmed four of its upcoming Ryzen 7000 Series processors.

As spotted by VideoCardz, AMD recently listed multiple Ryzen 7000 Series processors on its Library site, a web page that contains various company resources, including marketing assets. A screenshot shared by the publication highlights four SKUs, including the flagship Ryzen 9 7950X.

The listings can confirm that AMD’s Ryzen 7000 Series will include the following:

  • AMD Ryzen 9 7950X
  • AMD Ryzen 9 7900X
  • AMD Ryzen 7 7700X
  • AMD Ryzen 5 7600X
Image: AMD Library

It’s unclear whether the Ryzen 7 7700X will be available at launch, however.

AMD launched its Ryzen 5000 Series processors in October 2020, and the initial lineup only comprised the Ryzen 9 5950X, Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 7 5800X, and Ryzen 5 5600X. The Ryzen 7 5700X did not show up until March 2022, when it was launched alongside the Ryzen 5 5600 and Ryzen 5 5500 processors.

Greymon55, a recurring leaker, had claimed last month that AMD’s launch lineup for the Ryzen 7000 Series would only comprise the Ryzen 9 7950X, Ryzen 9 7900X, Ryzen 7 7800X, and Ryzen 5 7600X, noting that the “7700X is still not in the first lineup.”

An upcoming Meet the Experts event has suggested that AMD will launch its first Ryzen 7000 Series processors and AM5 platform by early August. The event will include an exclusive look at some of the first premium AM5 motherboards, including the ASUS ROG Crosshair X670E Extreme and GIGABYTE X670E AORUS Extreme.

Source: AMD Library (via VideoCardz)

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7 comments

  1. Its like I have mixed feelings on this :)

    I love seeing newer better tech and innovation, we have new generation of AMD and Intel CPU's coming along with a new generation of AMD/Nvidia GPU's and a just plain new Intel Gpu all coming soon and likely this year.

    And thus the march of progress bulldozers down my 'Top of the line' system and reducing it to something that is all 'Last Generation.' Not even my m.2's will escape the reduction as pcie 5 parts are already out.

    Ya well it'll still be beast for gaming and anything else I do, I think however, everyone here will understand that itch saying 'not the best' and 'you could get more fps' and 'wonder if I could drive 3x4k with eyefinity.' (I'd need 3 matching 4k's to even go there) Well that last one might just be me.
  2. I think I could be happy with 2 matching UHD's. 1440P... but honestly I really like the two monitor setup. I can play on one screen, and do whatever the **** else on the other. (You know uhhh... work, and or look up crap for games, watch youtube/netflix/pron... whatever.
  3. Still doesn't make sense to me why there is a need for a 3700x and 3800x, 5700x and 5800x and now 7700x and 7800x. There isn't enough of a difference between the two to justify the more expensive part. It's usually 1-3% difference in performance for 25-30% more cost.
  4. Still doesn't make sense to me why there is a need for a 3700x and 3800x, 5700x and 5800x and now 7700x and 7800x. There isn't enough of a difference between the two to justify the more expensive part. It's usually 1-3% difference in performance for 25-30% more cost.
    I imagine it's within threshold for making the CPU chiplets to have %'s in those ranges. If they can make them profitable SKU's rather than further devaluing them down to lower tier models it makes sense to do so.
  5. Still doesn't make sense to me why there is a need for a 3700x and 3800x, 5700x and 5800x and now 7700x and 7800x. There isn't enough of a difference between the two to justify the more expensive part. It's usually 1-3% difference in performance for 25-30% more cost.
    Consider the 12700k and 12900k.

    The difference on paper looks like higher clockspeeds and four more E-cores on the 12900k, but that's not what makes the biggest differences in gaming - the real differentiator is the additional cache and the better binning, which helps reduce cache misses and increases boost clocks under comparable power and thermal limits.

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