Image: ASUS

Intel is planning to unveil its first devices with Wi-Fi 7 (802.11be) in 2024.

Eric McLaughlin, vice president of Intel’s wireless solutions division, shared the news at a recent press conference in Asia, explaining how Intel is “currently developing Intel’s Wi-Fi 802.11be in order to obtain the Wi-Fi Alliance certification” and expects Wi-Fi 7 to be installed in laptops and other PC products “by 2024.” The technology is also expected to appear in “major markets” the following year.

“Wi-Fi 7 almost doubles the frequency bandwidth of 802.11ax (170 MHz) to 320 MHz and doubles the speed of Wi-Fi,” McLaughlin explained. “Since there is more than a year left before the release of 802.11be, there is still a chance that we could improve the processing speed even further.”

Korea’s ET News, which covered the event, teased how Intel will be improving laptop task processing performance with 802.11be.

Compared to the previous Wi-Fi 6, Wi-Fi 6E boasts 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 6 GHz wider frequency bandwidth and 2.4 Gbps processing speed. If 802.11be supports laptops, it is expected to speed up tasks such as streaming on laptop and downloading files compared to Wi-Fi 6E for laptops. This is because 802.11be has an improved frequency performance of 6GHz and 2.4 times faster processing speeds of 5.8Gbps. It also has the ability to support a maximum speed of 36 Gbps when working with data.

Wi-Fi 6 and Wi-Fi 6E were adopted in 2019 and 2020, respectively. Adoption of the latter has suffered for various reasons, with a chief one being component shortages.

“Although manufacturers launched Wi-Fi 6E products in mid-2021, products are either not available or they are in very limited supply,” noted Tam Dell’Oro, founder and CEO of Dell’Oro Group, in a report from February this year that called supply constraints “a pin the balloon” for Wi-Fi 6E.

Wi-Fi shipments are “significantly limited because of supply constraints,” except in China, she added.

Source: ETNews

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13 comments

  1. Since the start, my wifi speed capability exceeded my internet connection.
    I only just recently exceeded WiFI .11G with my ISP. Most of the time I can’t even saturate that.
  2. I’ve had gbit internet for years, but even downloading stuff from steam I never really get close to max throughput. Going to be quite a while, I think, before real world transfer speeds come anywhere near gbit.
  3. I’ve had gbit internet for years, but even downloading stuff from steam I never really get close to max throughput. Going to be quite a while, I think, before real world transfer speeds come anywhere near gbit.
    I get >2Gbit down from Steam and Origin these days...
  4. On a burst - Fiber line scales to 2.5Gbit when the infrastructure is there.
    Nice... I'm not willing to pay for 2.5 gig considering I'd need a new router to go with it and a 2.5gb nic as well.
  5. Nice... I'm not willing to pay for 2.5 gig considering I'd need a new router to go with it and a 2.5gb nic as well.
    Service came with the router, with a surprisingly decent 6E access point. 2.5Gbit NICs are fairly cheap, switches, not so much - but I'm running 10Gbit here ;)

    (but to expound on the access point... I was able to get ~700Mbps up and down with an iPhone, across the house)
  6. (but to expound on the access point... I was able to get ~700Mbps up and down with an iPhone, across the house)
    WTF do you do on an iPhone that can possibly use 700Mbps ?

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