Image: Intel

Intel’s next flagship CPU might be of particular interest to users who manage a lot of zip files.

Per benchmark results shared by @OneRaichu, a 13th Gen Intel Core i9-13900K processor will seemingly blow away the current Core i9-12900K flagship at compression and decompression duties via 7-Zip. Comparisons shared by publications that include Tom’s Hardware indicate “20% better compression and a whopping 60% better decompression” for Intel’s incoming Raptor Lake champion.

7-Zip Compression/Decompression Benchmark Comparison: Core i9-13900K vs. Core i9-12900K

7-ZipCore i9-13900KCore i9-12900K
Compression151MB/s126MB/s
Decompression2600MB/s1638MB/s

With a 7-Zip file size of 384MB and 3847MB, the Core i9-12900K was able to output 126 MB/s in the compression test, while in the decompression test the chip managed approximately 1630 MB/s with file sizes of 3847MB and 38475MB. However, the Raptor Lake part managed a noticeably higher 150 MB/s in the compression test, with 513MB and 5130MB file sizes. In the decompression test, it ran at 2600MB/s with file sizes of 5130MB and 51300MB.

This performance boost is probably owed to the 13th Gen Intel Core i9-13900K’s increased efficiency core count, as noted by the publication.

Since compression and decompressing can usually spread out to multiple cores, usually peaking at around 32 to 48 cores. In the 13900K’s case, the chip has 16 efficiency (E) cores plus 8 performance (P) cores for a total of 24. Also, helping matters is the 13900K’s higher clock speed margin on the P cores with boost frequencies beyond 5.5GHz.

Intel is expected to launch its first 13th Gen Core processors for desktops in October. They will likely be announced during the company’s Innovation event, which is slated for September 27. (AMD has reportedly shifted the launch of its Ryzen 7000 Series CPUs to this very same date.)

Source: @OneRaichu (via Tom’s Hardware)

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5 comments

  1. I mean... that's more the realm of batch processing and if they are not bringing their Litte/Big processing to the Server line I don't really care about the performance of compression and decompression. I mean other than when I'm installing or downloading games from Steam. ;)
  2. I'm confused why 7zip as a benchmark is relevant for... anything real world. I mean who personally needs to compress a zillion files?

    I'm much more interested in real world things, like video encoding or actual benchmarks. But hey, Intel gotta be Intel I guess.
  3. There is a lot of stuff that uses compression in the background that you don't always realize - a lot of network traffic, video game files (remember WAD files?), some file systems (you can enable file compression in Windows if you wanted to) etc. SSDs often do it in hardware.

    Now, not all of that is necessarily zip. Just saying sometimes it exists in places you wouldn't expect it to.

    That also isn't exactly a reason to do a benchmark just on ZIP.... if it exists in a lot of unexpected places, then the effects of that should show up in real world benchmarking.
  4. There is a lot of stuff that uses compression in the background that you don't always realize - a lot of network traffic, video game files (remember WAD files?), some file systems (you can enable file compression in Windows if you wanted to) etc. SSDs often do it in hardware.

    Now, not all of that is necessarily zip. Just saying sometimes it exists in places you wouldn't expect it to.

    That also isn't exactly a reason to do a benchmark just on ZIP.... if it exists in a lot of unexpected places, then the effects of that should show up in real world benchmarking.

    I agree with you that it does exist in a lot of places. But I have the distinct impression that it is NOT multithreaded in many of those self same places. For instance the built in windows decompression tool is apparently not multithreaded even in Windows 11. Yet Winrar is. Things of that nature are where I have questions.

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