Image: ASRock

Intel’s Arc graphics cards are finally starting to hit the U.S. market.

The very first appears to come in the form of ASRock’s Intel Arc A380 Challenger ITX 6GB OC, which is now available to pre-order at select retailers that include Newegg for $139.99. While the item is listed as being back-ordered and isn’t expected to ship until next week, early prospective Arc adopters will find a graphics card that counts 6 GB of GDDR6 memory, a core clock of 2,250 MHz, and PCIe 4.0 support among its key feature set.

The highlights of the Intel Arc A380 Challenger ITX 6GB OC, per ASRock’s official product page:

  • Clock: GPU / Memory
    • GPU Clock: 2250 MHz
    • Memory Clock: 15.5 Gbps
  • Key Specification
    • Intel Arc A380 Graphics
    • 6GB 96-bit GDDR6
    • DirectX 12 Ultimate
    • PCI Express 4.0 Support
    • 1 x 8-pin Power Connector
    • 3 x DisplayPort 2.0 with DSC / 1 x HDMI 2.0b
  • Key Features
    • Small Form Factor Design
    • Striped Axial Fan
    • 0dB Silent Cooling
    • Super Alloy Graphics Card
    • 8K Resolution Support
Image: Newegg

Intel said that Arc A380 GPUs would be available “shortly by system and component sales in other regions” in its press release from June that explained how they would initially be available in China that month.

It also included a handful of bullet points that detailed Arc A-series 3 graphics’ next-generation technologies, which the company called “the most complete technology feature set in this market segment.”

  • The Intel Arc A380 GPU supports the full set of DirectX 12 Ultimate features, including hardware accelerated ray tracing, and delivers fluid 1080p gaming experience at 60 frames per second (FPS) and above with popular titles like League of Legends, Moonlight Blade, Naraka: Bladepoint, and PUBG: Battlegrounds.
  • Intel Xe Matrix Extensions (Intel XMX) AI acceleration engines enable faster content creation and power Intel’s AI-based super sampling technology, XeSS, which arrives this summer.
  • The Xe Media Engine enables the future of video processing with industry-first hardware AV1 encoding acceleration, also supports HEVC and H.264 encode and decode, and is capable of 8K resolution media processing.
  • The Xe Display Engine supports up to four 4K 120Hz HDR displays, up to two 8K 60Hz displays, or up to 360Hz for 1080p and 1440p resolutions.
  • Intel Deep Link technologies harness the power of Intel CPUs and GPUs to unleash new levels of performance and efficiency across a variety of workloads.

Source: Newegg

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6 comments

  1. Probably not suitable for any of our gaming needs, but I could totally see buying somethng like this to upgrade the video hardware decode capability of an x86 HTPC box that currently uses on board only graphics.
  2. Probably not suitable for any of our gaming needs, but I could totally see buying somethng like this to upgrade the video hardware decode capability of an x86 HTPC box that currently uses on board only graphics.
    That'd be my exact use case; however, as AMD and Nvidia both have announcements coming up and both appear to be rather uncompetitive in the entry-level dGPU markets outside of gaming, I wonder if we won't see them push their latest transcoders down to <US$200 SKUs. Give me an RTX4030 (or GTX...?) that can encode AV1 competitively and we'll talk!
  3. That'd be my exact use case; however, as AMD and Nvidia both have announcements coming up and both appear to be rather uncompetitive in the entry-level dGPU markets outside of gaming, I wonder if we won't see them push their latest transcoders down to <US$200 SKUs. Give me an RTX4030 (or GTX...?) that can encode AV1 competitively and we'll talk!

    That's great for Windows boxes. Less so for the likes of - for example - an embedded Linux Kodi box. Nvidia has refused to play nice with video decode standards in Linux trying to make it proprietary, which has meant that they have gone from one of the best choices for video decode on Linux a few years back to being a very poor choice for that today.

    Surprisingly, on the Linux front, more work has gone into Intel iGPU video decode capability than any other GPU, and I'm hoping this translates to the Arc dGPU designs as well.

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