Image: ASUS

The ROG Crosshair X670E Extreme, ROG Crosshair X670E Hero, ROG Strix X670E-E Gaming WiFi, and TUF Gaming X670E-Plus WiFi aren’t the only X670E motherboards that ASUS has up its sleeve.

Per a new blog post shared via Edge Up, ASUS will be offering even more more extreme motherboards for AMD users to choose from in the form of the MicroATX ROG Crosshair X670E Gene and Mini-ITX ROG Strix X670E-I Gaming WiFi. There’s also new Prime and ProArt motherboards, the latter of which should be popular for users who seek a cleaner look.

ROG Crosshair X670E Gene

Image: ASUS
  • MicroATX form factor
  • Shimmering black and white ROG logo on the integrated I/O shield
  • Pixelated Fearless Eye icon on the chipset heatsink
  • RGB LED accents on the VRM heatsink, customizable with Aura Sync
  • PCIe 5.0 x16 slot
  • Two PCIe 5.0 M.2 slots and one PCIe 4.0 M.2 slot
  • Robust power solution with 16+2 teamed power stages rated for 110A
  • WIFi 6E, Intel 2.5G Ethernet
  • Pair of USB4 ports on the rear I/O, a header for a front-panel USB 3.2 Gen 2×2 Type-C port Support for Quick Charge 4+

ROG Strix X670E-I Gaming WiFi

Image: ASUS
Image: ASUS
  • Mini-ITX form factor
  • PCIe 5.0 x16 slot
  • Two M.2 slots, one wired for PCIe 5.0 and one wired for PCIe 4.0
  • Single heatsink cools the PCIe 5.0 M.2 slot and the chipset simultaneously
  • VRM temps are aided by a large backplate and thermal pad
  • Space-saving ROG FPS-II card
  • ROG Strix Hive external control interface with top-shelf audio hardware

ProArt X670E-Creator WiFi

Image: ASUS
  • Sophisticated style rooted in clean lines, graceful angles, and precise symmetry
  • Two PCIe 5.0 x16 slots
  • Four onboard M.2 slots, two wired for PCIe 5.0
  • Pair of USB4 ports on the rear I/O panel
  • Front panel USB 3.2 Gen 2×2 connector with support for Quick Charge 4+
  • WiFi 6E radio, Intel 2.5G Ethernet, Marvell AQtion 10G Ethernet port

Prime X670E-Pro WiFi

Image: ASUS
  • PCIe 5.0 x16 slot, PCIe 5.0 M.2 slot
  • WiFi 6E, Realtek 2.5Gb Ethernet port, Thunderbolt 4 header
  • PCIe Slot Q-Release button
  • Q-LED diagnostic array

Prime X670-P WiFi and Prime X670-P

  • Three onboard M.2 slots
  • Thunderbolt 4 header
  • Prime X670-P WiFi offers WiFi 6 connectivity

ASUS says that it’ll be sharing more about its new AMD motherboards at the Gamescom event in Cologne, Germany. The show will take place from August 24 to August 28.

Source: ASUS Edge Up

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8 comments

  1. They need to change it up a little. This is the same exact line up they have had for the last two or tree generations of not only AMD, but Intel boards. Hopefully their software is fixed as well. It doesn't always work with my current Z690-E board.
  2. They need to change it up a little. This is the same exact line up they have had for the last two or tree generations of not only AMD, but Intel boards. Hopefully their software is fixed as well. It doesn't always work with my current Z690-E board.
    Among the many announcements is the Crosshair X670E Gene - mATX, but with support for at least three NVMe drives, and with only two memory slots which should be beneficial for boosting DDR5 speeds. Also has dual USB4 on the back, which is replacing Thunderbolt almost universally for this initial AM5 release. Really the only thing it's missing is 10Gbit ethernet (in addition to the 2.5Gbit ethernet, you hear that ASUS!).
  3. Among the many announcements is the Crosshair X670E Gene - mATX, but with support for at least three NVMe drives, and with only two memory slots which should be beneficial for boosting DDR5 speeds. Also has dual USB4 on the back, which is replacing Thunderbolt almost universally for this initial AM5 release. Really the only thing it's missing is 10Gbit ethernet (in addition to the 2.5Gbit ethernet, you hear that ASUS!).
    As our resident ITX specialist, I was waiting for your take on it. I agree there's a lot packed in there. My only concern is how close that PCIe slot is to that shroud. I could see a thicker GPU potentially not fitting but maybe that's not really an issue. I hear ya, @Niner51 but at least they got many modern/current things in there. I've noticed for a while how Asus hasn't been changing anything with their Strix GPUs so it's not a surprise the motherboards are retaining things from previous gens. It seems like they're in a bit of a lull right now. Ebb and flow.
  4. I like the mATX... Don't like asus. Lets hope others come out with something comparable.
    That's mean! Where did ASUS hurt you?

    As our resident ITX specialist, I was waiting for your take on it. I agree there's a lot packed in there.
    The Strix ITX board looks quite a bit like their X570-I - but really, with the connection limitations on ITX, we'd want to wait for the 'B650' boards, because the compromises involved with packing the dual-chip X670E chipset into an ITX don't really bring any advantages. And well, there are some serious clearance issues to deal with that will at least frustrate users if not disqualify the board for certain configurations.

    For me, it's the mATX board that's most interesting. Due to the trend of higher-end boards basically just skipping out on extra PCIe slots and memory speeds being limited on four-slot boards, the only things you lose dropping to mATX are one or two M.2 slots where (E)ATX boards can bring four or five, and maybe a few SATA ports and of course max memory capacity.

    I'm still somewhat on the fence about USB4, though. I think it'll be good, but we need to see real-world user experiences to validate with Thunderbolt devices.



    Speaking specifically to the lineups, and having myself just gone through the process of really immersing myself in what these lineups communicate for each company, I really do appreciate the schemes. You generally know what to expect with each one, where the segmentation is useful.
  5. And look at the clutter they have on that itx board. You are going to be stuck with one of their AIO's or custom water cooling.
    If you're buying the Strix ITX board for a low-end CPU, well...

    And if you're putting in a proper higher-end CPU, are you going to stick a 160mm air cooler on top and stick it in a massive case?

    Remember, the X670E is the high end chipset. It's overkill for the average build, most especially for ITX where there just isn't space to make use of the additional features it has beyond what the B650 chipset will bring.
  6. If you're buying the Strix ITX board for a low-end CPU, well...

    And if you're putting in a proper higher-end CPU, are you going to stick a 160mm air cooler on top and stick it in a massive case?

    Remember, the X670E is the high end chipset. It's overkill for the average build, most especially for ITX where there just isn't space to make use of the additional features it has beyond what the B650 chipset will bring.
    Plenty of people will jump on this board though for their 7600x. It just happens. I'd much rather have Air cooling and would go B650 anyway. But the SFF community will eat this up no matter the CPU.

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