Image: Seasonic

Seasonic has announced VERTEX, a new series of power supplies that were designed for the latest PC components leveraging the new ATX 3.0 and PCIe 5.0 standards. Eight models have been teased, including the VERTEX PX-1200 and VERTEX GX-1200, which will cost $259.99 and $229.99, respectively. They will be available beginning mid-December 2022.

Seasonic VERTEX features:

  • Full modularity for the best cable management options
  • Added 12VHPWR cable to comply with the new graphic cards
  • 135mm Fluid Dynamic Bearing (FDB) fan for quiet operation
  • Seasonic Hybrid Silent Fan Control for optimal cooling
  • Complete protection features: OPP / OVP / UVP / SCP / OCP / OTP
  • 10 years warranty – our commitment to high quality

VERTEX Platinum models:

  • VERTEX PX-1200: $ 259.99 / € 309.00
  • VERTEX PX-1000: $ 219.99 / € 259.00
  • VERTEX PX-850: $ 189.99 / € 229.00
  • VERTEX PX-750: $ 169.99 / € 199.00

VERTEX Gold models:

  • VERTEX GX-1200: $ 229.99 / € 269.00
  • VERTEX GX-1000: $ 199,99 / € 239,00
  • VERTEX GX-850: $ 169,99 / € 199.00
  • VERTEX GX-750: $ 149,99 / € 179.00

From a Seasonic press release:

Sea Sonic Electronics., Co., Ltd. is proud to announce the introduction of the new VERTEX Series of power supplies specifically designed and built to power new PC components requiring the new ATX 3.0 and PCIe 5.0 standards.

On the heel of NVIDIA’s recent announcement about the release of the new RTX4090 VGA cards, we entered a new era, where the power supply, more than ever, has an important role to play. Issues such as VGA excursion power and cable integrity (now with high-grade 12VHPWR connectors) should be resolved.

The new VERTEX Series units will provide 1200 W / 1000 W / 850 W and 750 Watts of true power in both Platinum and Gold levels of efficiency, with all the best features you can expect from a Seasonic power supply.

Go to thread

Don’t Miss Out on More FPS Review Content!

Our weekly newsletter includes a recap of our reviews and a run down of the most popular tech news that we published.

8 comments

  1. Will they be guarantees dead within 2 years, like the OCZ products by the same name? 😅
    Hey, OCZ Vertex lasted a little longer than that!

    ...but I've yet to have a Seasonic fail :)
  2. Hey, OCZ Vertex lasted a little longer than that!

    ...but I've yet to have a Seasonic fail :)

    Yeah, Seasonic makes quality stuff. I did have one die on me though. When I replaced my stepsons dead Corsir the replacement (a seasonic unit) died within a week. Replaced it under RMA and it has been fine since.

    Can't remember the model number though. It was one of the more entry level ones, not a Prime like I have in my system.
  3. So, I'm puzzling together bits and pieces from different sources when it comes to this new standard, but it has been explained to me that there is a new power control wire or something, that the PSU has to be compatible with and be able to read, or you risk melting ****, so you are forced to buy a new PSU rather than just new wiring.

    Is that the gist of it?

    Sounds like a bullshit move from the PSU industry to sell you more stuff you don't need.
  4. Vertex, huh?

    Will they be guaranteed dead within 2 years, like the OCZ products by the same name? 😅
    We have OCZ Vertex SSDs in all workstations purchased in 2011. Zero failures so far. True most of them was retired from mainline use a few years ago, but still they stood up to 8-10 years of abuse. And I mean abuse, not your regular joe usage.
  5. So, I'm puzzling together bits and pieces from different sources when it comes to this new standard, but it has been explained to me that there is a new power control wire or something, that the PSU has to be compatible with and be able to read, or you risk melting ****, so you are forced to buy a new PSU rather than just new wiring.

    Is that the gist of it?

    Sounds like a bullshit move from the PSU industry to sell you more stuff you don't need.
    Almost, actually the signal is just 4 pins, either can have an on-off state, so basically 4 bits, nothing intelligent to it. The PSU sends the signal to the GPU telling it how much power it can draw. That's it. Completely useless gimmick, especially if you have a PSU that far exceeds the total system power.

Leave a comment

Please log in to your forum account to comment