Something else that Ryzen 3000 owners have been worried about is high voltage and temperature readings, even when their systems were “idle.” Voltages would jump as high as 1.5 V and remain there, which didn’t sit well with enthusiasts who expected “safer” voltages in the 1.3X range.

AMD has attempted to mitigate the problem with its latest chipset driver, 1.07.29, which tweaks the Collaborative Power and Performance Control (CPPC2) feature to reduce Ryzen’s sensitivity to boost requests. Apparently, the latest chips boost so well and so quickly that they were confusing software monitoring tools. The solution also relies on a new Ryzen Balanced power plan.

Altogether, this new power plan is designed to make the processor more relaxed when the loads are intermittent or light, without taking away from the processor’s ability to respond to sustained workloads like games and content creation. It should have the effect of solving the voltage and frequency behaviors you’ve reported to us over the past few weeks. We truly appreciate your reports and messages, as they were instrumental in diagnosing and resolving this issue.

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