Image: Intel

UserBenchmark had an interesting score show up recently and this time around it potentially resembles the upcoming Lakefield product line. Popular twitter user, @TUM_APISAK, has come across scores for a i5-L16G7 processor. This particular CPU has an unusual twist though. We commonly see core/thread counts with a base 2 or base 4 count. This one is 5 core/5 threads which seems similar to some European automotive engines.

Tsing reported on Jim Keller speaking about Lakefield back in July. He stated that Lakefield would use a stacking approach. This could increase transistor density by 50% over the 10nm fab. TechPowerUp likened it to an ARM big.Little SoC in that it has one larger core paired to four smaller ones. It then uses a scheduling for workload balancing and a Gen 11 iGPU to provide the graphics solution.

Image: Intel

TPU goes on to note nomenclature changes for Intel’s recent CPU announcements. The top tier chips such as the i9 10980XE that Dan reviewed use 7 characters while this one uses only five. There are seemingly logical guesses as to the new naming strategy. The “L” may very well represent Lakefield. “G” could indicate the iGPU. Other numbers could be model or tier related. Further releases and announcements will likely elaborate on this.

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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

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2 Comments

  1. A 5 core CPU could be interesting. But in a quick read through of that article why would I want 1 regular CPU and 4 under powered ones? That’s like saying you get 5 threads because we do 4:1 multi-threading on a single core.

  2. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 9777, member: 215″]
    A 5 core CPU could be interesting. But in a quick read through of that article why would I want 1 regular CPU and 4 under powered ones? That’s like saying you get 5 threads because we do 4:1 multi-threading on a single core.
    [/QUOTE]

    It’s very nice on laptops and mobiles, as it can save a good deal on battery life – it could have some applications in servers which don’t have high load factors. For desktops/workstations – yeah I don’t see a lot of application there as you aren’t necessarily power or density constrained (unless your looking inside the die with these very high core count chips)

    Interesting that Intel is coming back to this now. They had steered away from it while ARM embraced it, showing that, at least for Intel and their arch, trace to idle on a faster core was overall more power efficient. I wonder if they are starting to hit a wall with that.

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