System Benchmarks

We are going to start with system benchmarks for comparisons, these are the kind of benchmarks that provide an overall performance score to compare with.  These are also benchmarks that may either test the system as a whole, including many different real-world workloads, or stress the CPU in ways real-world everyday workloads are performed to produce a performance result.

PCMark 10

We will start with the latest version of PCMark 10 Professional Edition version 2.1.2177 64.  We are running the standard PCMark 10 benchmark, not the express, and not the extended. 

Intel Core i5-10600K PCMark 10 Benchmark

In this system benchmark the Intel Core i5-10600K is slightly faster, about 3% than the AMD Ryzen 5 3600X in these various desktop office use case workloads.  This could be down to clock speed.  The Intel Core i5-10600K is 8% faster than its predecessor, the i5-9600K.  This is a much bigger difference, showing some improvement for sure over the last gen.  The Ryzen 5 3600X beat the 9600K quite thoroughly, so the new Intel i5-10600K finally offers some competition. 

Intel Core i5-10600K PCMark 10 Benchmark

In this next PCMark 10 test we are performing the Application Benchmark.  This benchmark benches Microsoft Office in desktop workloads.  We have Microsoft Office 2019 Home and Student installed with the latest version.  In Microsoft Office usage it appears the Intel Core i5-10600K is on top again.  It is just barely on top though, with very close performance to the Ryzen 5 3600X, by 6%.  The Intel Core i5-10600K has a bigger uplift over the i5-9600K at 13%.  Once again the Ryzen 5 3600X killed the i5-9600K, but the new Intel i5-10600K offers up some real competition in office applications.      

Geekbench 5

The next test we are running is the CPU testing in Geekbench 5 (5.1.1) version.  The result produces an overall score in Multi-Threading and Single-Threading.

Intel Core i5-10600K Geekbench 5 Multi-Core Score

In the Multi-Core Score, AMD Ryzen 5 3600X is on top, by 7%.  Intel Core i5-10600K is 17% faster than the i5-9600K, showing a big improvement in multi-core performance.  Thank you, Hyperthreading.      

Intel Core i5-10600K Geekbench 5 Single-Core Score

In Single-Core Score, the tables turn again and the Intel Core i5-10600K is on top again, by a couple of percent.  No doubt the single-core clock speed boost is helping here.  It is also 4% faster than the 9600K. 

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9 Comments

  1. There are several sites like B&H listing prices for them, but availability is unknown. B&H does list the 10700 for sale. If you go to the drop down, it shows "coming soon" for most of the CPU’s. So, availability may be there but its spotty at best.
  2. Nicely written article as well. I preferred the order of presentation and including the overclocked results of the bigger chip. But this was all there as well.

    I do kinda sorta miss a pull down to hop to the testing results, sometimes reading the methodology is nice, but when it is a site and testers I trust I just want to see some numbers! ;)

  3. We may create a unified CPU review format at some point in the future. Unfortunately, this was the least amount of lead time we’ve ever had so Brent and I worked entirely independently to get these done.
  4. We may create a unified CPU review format at some point in the future. Unfortunately, this was the least amount of lead time we’ve ever had so Brent and I worked entirely independently to get these done.

    Naaa it’s all good. I enjoyed reading both reviews. Good on both of you on cranking these out in the short window you had!

  5. I do kinda sorta miss a pull down to hop to the testing results

    Table of Contents is at the top of both articles for me – is it missing for you?

    If it’s there now and was missing, it was likely when Brent was fixing some internal links as the plugin for it will randomly turn off the ToC when making edits.

    If it’s not there now, then you’re blocking that javascript.

    If you’re missing something else… please describe?

  6. Table of Contents is at the top of both articles for me – is it missing for you?

    If it’s there now and was missing, it was likely when Brent was fixing some internal links as the plugin for it will randomly turn off the ToC when making edits.

    If it’s not there now, then you’re blocking that javascript.

    If you’re missing something else… please describe?

    I may have grown accustomed to looking for the jump pages at the bottom of the screen in a pull down and never thought to check the top… maybe…. damnit.

  7. I may have grown accustomed to looking for the jump pages at the bottom of the screen in a pull down and never thought to check the top… maybe…. damnit.

    You inspired me to see if my WordPress/wizardry has grown enough to figure out how to put it back at the bottom. Looks like it worked. Enjoy the ToC at top and bottom of content and let me know if I broke something by doing that…

  8. You inspired me to see if my WordPress/wizardry has grown enough to figure out how to put it back at the bottom. Looks like it worked. Enjoy the ToC at top and bottom of content and let me know if I broke something by doing that…

    That works!

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