Introduction

SilverStone PF360-ARGB AIO Cooler on white background in box

Today marks the second review that we will be using our new AIO test platform that is capable of putting out enough heat to make even the devil sweat. We do this to test AIO liquid cooling solutions that we are likely to use with some of today’s most demanding CPUs. So, on the bench today is the SilverStone PF360-ARGB (SST-PF360-ARGB) liquid cooler which is currently the most capable cooler in SilverStone’s Permafrost line.

SilverStone PF360-ARGB Overview

The SilverStone PF360-ARGB AIO cooler is an all in one CPU cooler that is designed to work on a wide variety of sockets, including Intel’s LGA 775/115X/1200/1366/2011/2066 and AMD’s AM2/AM3/AM4/FM1/FM2. While this covers most high-end desktop processors, it is not compatible with the Threadripper’s TR4 socket. The tubes connecting the water block to the radiator measure 400mm much as we saw with our previous Enermax LIQTECH II 360mm unit.

RGB Water Block

SilverStone PF360-ARGB AIO Cooler Diagram
Image credit: SilverStone

The water block features a multi chamber design that helps isolate hot and cold liquid channels. These channels in the water block are 0.2mm each, which helps distribute coolant flow and increase heat dissipation, and are paired with a copper base.

The cube-shaped water block includes the pump and measures approximately 61 mm x 61 mm x 50 mm. Making it significantly smaller than the one on the Enermax LIQTECH II 360 we recently reviewed.

Pump

SilverStone PF360-ARGB AIO Cooler Pump Diagram
Image Credit: SilverStone

The pump used with the PF360-RGB is a multi-chamber design motor that utilizes a three-phase, six-pole design, and an “automotive” grade sine wave generator to drive the pump and ensure maximum performance. This design is supposed to result in excellent electrical noise with geometry optimized pole design for smoother vibration reduction along with providing excellent durability and the lowest possible noise. The pump also prevents heat bleeding and sports a motor speed of 3,400 RPM (+/-10%).

Radiator

The radiator is designed to hold three 120mm fans and measures 394 mm x 120 mm x 28 mm and is an “automotive design” which, per SilverStone’s advertising, means it will be greatly resistant to corrosion and harsh chemicals. By our count, the aluminum radiator sports a density of 21 fins per inch.

Fans

SilverStone PF360-ARGB AIO Cooler Fans
SilverStone PF360-ARGB AIO Cooler Fan Up Close

The included APA1225H12 fans are, in fact, SilverStone’s standard-sized 9 bladed Air Blazer 120mm PWM fans that have a hydro bearing design and are rated for a lifetime of 40,000 hours. The hydro bearing equipped Air Blazers to support a fan speed of 600 to 2,200 (+/-10%) RPM at a reported noise level of 7.4 to 35.6 dB(A). The stated airflow is 25.62 to 93.97 CFM with a static pressure of 0.26 to 3.53 mm H2O. The fans also have rubber pads on the corners to reduce vibration. The design of the blades that suppress air has unique ribbed edge fan blades.

RGB

SilverStone PF360-ARGB AIO Cooler RGB

There is an addressable RGB (ARGB lighting) water block as well as fans included with the PF360-RGB today. The RGB connectivity is provided through a 3 pin ARGB (5V/Data/Ground) connector and is compatible with most motherboards that have controllable RGB lighting baked in (such as ASUS, AsRock, MSI and ASROCK). However, SilverStone also includes a basic controller in the box for folks that do not have RGB capabilities built into their system. Though, this should be thought of as a fallback option and not your primary means of running your RGB light show.

Let’s move on now to our test setup and installation of the SilverStone PF360-RGB.

David Schroth

David is a computer hardware enthusiast that has been tinkering with computer hardware for the past 25 years.

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6 Comments

  1. I might be the only person on earth interested, but I wonder how it would perform with one of those 5000 rpm 120x38mm deltas. Said another way, how much RPM / airflow would it take to prevent throttling? If you absolutely don’t care about volume, what temps could you achieve?
  2. I might be the only person on earth interested, but I wonder how it would perform with one of those 5000 rpm 120x38mm deltas. Said another way, how much RPM / airflow would it take to prevent throttling? If you absolutely don’t care about volume, what temps could you achieve?

    Or perhaps 3 of them? 😀

  3. Or perhaps 3 of them? 😀

    Heck, 3 would be even better! :D Might need to bolt the case to the floor to keep it from moving on it’s own though.

    I’ll bet all 3 fan AIOs would pass the 500 watt challenge with 700CFM blowing through them.

  4. also of interest would be the improvement seen going push / pull with a set of reasonable fans to supplement the fans that come with the cooler.

    Of course, adding a test with push / pull fans, and adding a high cfm test would add a bunch of extra work to each review. That said, it would also add some dimensions to reviews not seen on other sites as well.

  5. also of interest would be the improvement seen going push / pull with a set of reasonable fans to supplement the fans that come with the cooler.

    Of course, adding a test with push / pull fans, and adding a high cfm test would add a bunch of extra work to each review. That said, it would also add some dimensions to reviews not seen on other sites as well.

    The overall work level wouldn’t be too bad on it as long as I’ve got the right mounting hardware handy, but it seems like it’d be a completely separate "topic" if that makes sense. The goal of the review in my mind is to review the hardware that you’d get if you went out and bought this exact item.

    If the radiator is the common limiting factor, then, in theory, testing this theory one time (say, with different size radiators/aios) would be a good article to reference when talking about boosting performance of a particular unit being reviewed without having to redo it each time. I can add this study to the backlog of things on my list to see if I can do it correctly, but it’s also getting close to the world of custom loops (which we’re also starting to explore from a review/testing perspective – though, I suppose it’s good "baseline" information that can apply to both).

  6. I would say it’s a different category than custom loops – actually building your own loop is a different ball game of complexity, and there is no safety of a warranty.

    slapping on extra fans or different fans is a simple change that (hopefully) improves performance for a couple extra minutes of work during AIO install for the end user.

    For example, while I generally go custom loop for my main rig, I picked up a Corsair H150i substantially on sale at microCenter when I bought my 2700X. Since I wasn’t intending on building a full custom loop for that rig right that second, I installed the H150i and tossed on 3 gentle typhoon AP 15s that i had laying around in addition to the stock out of the box fans. Total additional work was a couple minutes and additional cost was 0. I assume I got a performance benefit from the extra fans, but I didn’t test without them so I can’t say for certain.

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